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-   -   What would you do in an emergency evacuation? (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/travelbuzz/1886751-what-would-you-do-emergency-evacuation.html)

PTravel Jan 7, 18 7:42 pm


Originally Posted by ricski64 (Post 29263352)
i am currently on Westjet itinerary and was explicitly told that in the event of an emergency I could remove Fido from kennel and evacuate the craft with dog in arms.
As to whether an animals life is less “value” as to a humans. There are plenty of examples where humans activity on board (in none emergency situation) makes me love my dog even more.

All I can say is, if I'm board with you in an emergency evacuation, and you hold me or my wife up while you deal with your pet, I'm going around you . . . or over you. Sorry, but I'm not risking my or my wife's life for your pet.

Annalisa12 Jan 7, 18 9:52 pm


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 29260124)

I also ask that the passenger in the window seat open the shades on landing at least half way so one can see if there's fire on that side. Only once did the passenger refuse. She was militant and probably felt she was a lifelong victim of discrimination so she had to insist on her way.

Every landing I have had has been with shadescup. It wasn't a choice by passengers to make.

abmj-jr Jan 7, 18 9:54 pm

delete

DragonSoul Jan 7, 18 9:57 pm

Having had to 'participate' in an evacuation (1970s), I am ready to crawl over seats and bodies to get out. It was mayhem and chaos - and frightening, but fortunately no fire or smoke. And this was a time before passengers toted massive and multiple carry-ons; at most, people had a small bag.

People are notoriously bad at risk assessment, and this includes when there is an emergency. As others have mentioned, people revert to normalcy, which in the case of getting off a plane is to grab baggage. Perhaps the seats nearer the exits can be given to those willing to forego evacuating with their luggage, leaving those who can't/won't manage that sitting further away from the exits and required to exit last, even after the crew. It's about making people think about the situation BEFORE they get on the plane. "Yes, check-in person, I want to leave with my carry-on in the case of an emergency, and am willing to die for the soiled underwear in my carry-on."

Rambling rant...

FlyingHoustonian Jan 7, 18 10:03 pm

I am fairly sure what I would do as well because I have been through the FAA's smoke/evac training lab at OKC several times as part of my Air Force and NATO training and have actually had to use the slide once at NATO off the E-3 (707). Listening to the FA's is very important; in terms of opening an emergency hatch on the exit row I have done it many times so likely training would still kick in should it be the proper circumstance. The only minor difference in training I recall with evacs in general is whether to place the hatch inside or outside the aircraft with different orgs have slightly different rules. Otherwise it is a fairly standard worldwide system, even for the militaries.

trooper Jan 7, 18 10:03 pm

I was once asked what steps I would take in an Emergency....

Apparently "Effing BIG ones" wasn't the answer they were looking for........:D

(an oldie but a goodie....)

chrisl137 Jan 7, 18 11:06 pm


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 29262301)
Southwest Airlines 737 overrun accident at BUR. Slides deployed. No fire or smoke.

If I remember the news coverage correctly, they had trouble accounting for everyone on board because some people just got off with their luggage and went home. The overrun left them about a 2 minute walk to VSP and Lot C, and almost in Lot B. It was a flight from LAS to BUR, so it's not unusual to have only a small carry-on or just a personal item.

CDTraveler Jan 7, 18 11:25 pm


Originally Posted by C W (Post 29263252)
People who try to get bags during emergency evacuations should be prosecuted.

It should be part of the safety briefing, just like announcements about smoking penalties: anybody who opens an overhead or carries a bag during an emergency evacuation will be charged with felony reckless endangerment.

What a ridiculous suggestion.

Exactly how would you track "People who try to get bags" in a smoke filled cabin? Install infrared cameras, maybe? What jurisdiction would they be prosecuted in? Local, state, or are you making it a federal crime? Have the FAA go through the wreckage, and try to ID the owners of bags not in the bins? Of course, bins do come open sometimes on hard landings, so the mere fact a bin is open wouldn't be proof a passenger was guilty of opening it.

Or maybe you want that crime added to the international air travel agreements between countries, so its a world wide crime? :rolleyes:

OccasionalFlyerPerson Jan 8, 18 1:05 am


Originally Posted by kb9522 (Post 29262946)
The failure of those with information about the event to communicate the details is a separate issue. This is why people who have said they would consider taking their carry on did so with the caveat that context is known.

But, you don't have information; that's the whole point. You may believe that you have information, but fire can spread very quickly.


Originally Posted by kb9522 (Post 29263054)
I mean it goes without saying that you should maintain situational awareness.

This is plain ridiculous. If you're leaving the plane in an emergency it is not your responsibility to be avoiding additional obstacles or injury due to baggage being carried by those leaving before and after you.

DragonSoul Jan 8, 18 1:57 am


Originally Posted by kb9522 (Post 29262946)


The failure of those with information about the event to communicate the details is a separate issue. This is why people who have said they would consider taking their carry on did so with the caveat that context is known.

Sometimes the context is known (Asiana 2013)...


But people still will grab carry-ons and their precious duty free.

https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/www.fly...dd9aec5948.jpg

kb9522 Jan 8, 18 6:15 am


Originally Posted by OccasionalFlyerPerson (Post 29264134)
But, you don't have information; that's the whole point. You may believe that you have information, but fire can spread very quickly.



This is plain ridiculous. If you're leaving the plane in an emergency it is not your responsibility to be avoiding additional obstacles or injury due to baggage being carried by those leaving before and after you.

Right, you're not responsible for your own safety... that's someone else's job! :rolleyes:

Badenoch Jan 8, 18 7:56 am


Originally Posted by kb9522 (Post 29264710)
Right, you're not responsible for your own safety... that's someone else's job! :rolleyes:

Situational awareness is important. Mine has brought me through safely several times during a varied and interesting career. Mine concludes that if the people running the aircraft give an evacuation order I am not going to stand there because in your infinite wisdom you believe the situation is not so serious and the rest of us should wait while you get your luggage. I am responsible for my own safety and won't compromise mine because of your peculiar need to carry your possessions off a plane that might be on fire. Get moving or get out of the way.

OTD Jan 8, 18 7:56 am

I'm one of the few people I see actually looking for the nearest exits during the safety briefing. My main concern is that if the nearest exit is indeed behind me, it won't matter because I suspect most people's reaction will be to head toward the front of the plane.

wrp96 Jan 8, 18 8:10 am


Originally Posted by OTD (Post 29265000)
I'm one of the few people I see actually looking for the nearest exits during the safety briefing. My main concern is that if the nearest exit is indeed behind me, it won't matter because I suspect most people's reaction will be to head toward the front of the plane.

I count rows forward and aft as soon as I step on the plane. In the dark in an emergency, I want to know that I can get out by feel. I do something similar with hotels by counting doorways to the emergency exits. I also keep a small flashlight in my purse, which happens to be on my person at all times. It also has my phone, meds, and ID. That's all I need. No need to stop and grab anything - everything I need is on my person. Nothing that can easily fly about or catch on something hindering or injuring myself or someone else.

kb9522 Jan 8, 18 9:56 am


Originally Posted by DragonSoul (Post 29264220)
Sometimes the context is known (Asiana 2013)...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTXDalv7kNQ

But people still will grab carry-ons and their precious duty free.

https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/www.fly...dd9aec5948.jpg

How many of them died because people stopped to get their luggage? One died because they weren't wearing a seatbelt, one got run over by a fire truck, and one died from being hit by a door.


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