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PTravel Jan 6, 18 9:50 pm

What would you do in an emergency evacuation?
 
At Pearson airport today, two jets collided when one being towed hit another that was waiting for a gate. A fire broke out when spilled jet fuel ignited. When smoke started to fill the cabin of the waiting jet, the captain ordered an evacuation -- emergency exits were open and slides were deployed. And the evacuation was slowed by people trying to get their carry-on luggage. Fortunately, no injuries occurred.

If had been a passenger on that plane, I would follow crew member instructions, help children, elderly and disabled pax as best as I could, and throw anyone holding up the process by trying to get their carry-ons out of the way and, if necessary, I'd go right over them. Human lives are worth far more than some fool's possessions.

What would you do?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.94f3035cd0a1

JamesBigglesworth Jan 6, 18 10:11 pm

If it is in Amerikaland then I'd scream loudly and say things like "Oh my god!" at least twenty times in a row because apparently that helps.

Otherwise, it's nearest exit and out.

People stopping to get luggage are to be helped by stopping to beat them senseless: if you're going to die because of the stupidity of someone else then you may as well die somewhat avenged. Not my job to help others - if US carriers are going to spout the "we're here for your safety" then they can damn well do their job and look after the bottom of the survival bell curve.

abmj-jr Jan 6, 18 10:13 pm

Being a retired LEO, I'd probably react like one. I don't think I'd be assaulting people as you suggest but one never knows what might be required.

It might be well to remember that some folks have an absolute need for some of what might be in a carry-on. At my advanced age, I will need my meds in the next 24 hours. For that reason, I keep them and a few other essentials in a small zipper bag in an outside pocket of my back-pack, which is under the seat in front of me. There would be no need, or excuse, to retrieve anything from the overhead bin but I would definitely grab that zipper bag and a coat (if it is cold) as I lined up for the exit. Try to stop me from doing that and you might be the one being "thrown out of the way."

spades097 Jan 6, 18 10:24 pm


Originally Posted by JamesBigglesworth (Post 29260019)
If it is in Amerikaland then I'd scream loudly and say things like "Oh my god!" at least twenty times in a row because apparently that helps.

Otherwise, it's nearest exit and out.

People stopping to get luggage are to be helped by stopping to beat them senseless: if you're going to die because of the stupidity of someone else then you may as well die somewhat avenged. Not my job to help others - if US carriers are going to spout the "we're here for your safety" then they can damn well do their job and look after the bottom of the survival bell curve.

Yes, because people freaking out during an emergency is unique in America. Please enlighten us with all of your experience evacuating aircraft.

Annalisa12 Jan 6, 18 10:27 pm

Nobody knows what they'd do in an emergency situation.

Toshbaf Jan 6, 18 10:56 pm

I'll admit that if there were an evacuation, I would consider taking my luggage. It depends if it were an evacuation for legal reasons or a dire emergency. Dire emergency, like the Asiana 777 crash at SFO or US 1549 in the Hudson River, I'd run for my life. If it seems somewhat precautionary, I'd take my luggage because it could be a fight for reimbursement or things that are hard to replace may be lost.

Lately, I've been wearing my coat before landing if the weather is very cold and I put some harder to replace things in my pockets, like the phone, keys, ID, and credit cards.

I also ask that the passenger in the window seat open the shades on landing at least half way so one can see if there's fire on that side. Only once did the passenger refuse. She was militant and probably felt she was a lifelong victim of discrimination so she had to insist on her way.

kb9522 Jan 6, 18 11:37 pm


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 29260124)
I also ask that the passenger in the window seat open the shades on landing at least half way so one can see if there's fire on that side. Only once did the passenger refuse. She was militant and probably felt she was a lifelong victim of discrimination so she had to insist on her way.

Or maybe she thought you were nuts. You get worried about fires every time you land? :confused:

In any case, window seat gets control of the window... them's the breaks.

Re: the OP... I would also consider grabbing my carry on depending on the situation. The only people who need to be "beaten senseless" are the emotional train wrecks who can't deal with a little stress.


FirstInFlight Jan 7, 18 12:13 am

Remember that in an actual emergency evacuation the goal is to the off the plane. If someone stops and blocks the aisle getting a bag they create an obstruction. If you decide to fight with them you create a second obstruction

In an actual emergency you do not have time to argue or fight. Get out. Squeeze past the idiots (those worried about luggage and those consumed with the need to confront) or climb over seat backs - but get.

Do not stand at the exit trying to help others and thereby creating an obstruction - get out. If you want to help do so at the bottom of the slide (depending on the aircraft and the circumstances there may be several injuries). Otherwise - get out and get away from the aircraft.

T2A Jan 7, 18 12:47 am

Flight attendants are trying to get the plane fully evacuated in 90 seconds. The few seconds someone takes to grab their bag could be the difference between life and death for them or a fellow passenger. In any situation involving fire I'm getting off that aircraft as fast as possible while helping as many others as I can along the way. I'd have no problem climbing over someone trying to get their baggage off the plane.

tatterdema Jan 7, 18 4:02 am


Originally Posted by abmj-jr (Post 29260025)
Being a retired LEO, I'd probably react like one. I don't think I'd be assaulting people as you suggest but one never knows what might be required.

It might be well to remember that some folks have an absolute need for some of what might be in a carry-on. At my advanced age, I will need my meds in the next 24 hours. For that reason, I keep them and a few other essentials in a small zipper bag in an outside pocket of my back-pack, which is under the seat in front of me. There would be no need, or excuse, to retrieve anything from the overhead bin but I would definitely grab that zipper bag and a coat (if it is cold) as I lined up for the exit. Try to stop me from doing that and you might be the one being "thrown out of the way."

Ditto to the meds (passport, wallet, keys, etc). I keep a small toiletry type bag for that reason. Easy to carry, my wrist slips through the strap. Stores nicely under the arm rest.

Badenoch Jan 7, 18 5:10 am

In the event of an evacuation the sole objective is GTFO as soon as possible. People ahead of me pausing to retrieve their luggage, coat or anything else will be moved either aside or forward. If you need anything that badly it should be on your person. My wallet, phone, passport (if travelling internationally) are in my pockets during the flight.

DIRECT MERIT Jan 7, 18 5:43 am

I can't believe this is up for discussion. There is only one course of action to follow: obey crew member instructions and evacuate immediately on their command. If you need to travel with meds, make sure they're in your trouser pocket or otherwise immediately accessible. On a 90 second evacuation, every fraction of a second counts. It should also be mandatory for window shades to be up during take off and landing - again any time spent adjusting to darkness outside for a lit cabin is time wasted. Any passenger reaching for carry-on items is endangering lives and should be prosecuted as such.

WorldLux Jan 7, 18 6:01 am


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 29260124)
If it seems somewhat precautionary, I'd take my luggage because it could be a fight for reimbursement or things that are hard to replace may be lost.

That's what we need: Armchair passenger questioning the emergency level when the captain orders to evacuate ASAP and use the slides. They don't inflate the slides for fun. It would be great if there was a law saying "Anyone caught with a carry-on will be fined ten times the value of the carry-on and all of its content." In most cases I carry around valuables in my carry-on but at no point would I hesitate to leave everything behind in the airplane.

Everything but live and/or live changing injuries can be replaced.


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 29260124)
Lately, I've been wearing my coat before landing if the weather is very cold and I put some harder to replace things in my pockets, like the phone, keys, ID, and credit cards.

​​​​​​​
Those are not hard to replace. It's annoying to get them replaced but it's not hard. Takes you a day's work to replace locks, phone, IDs and credit cards.


I also ask that the passenger in the window seat open the shades on landing at least half way so one can see if there's fire on that side. Only once did the passenger refuse. She was militant and probably felt she was a lifelong victim of discrimination so she had to insist on her way.[/QUOTE]

ChangingNappies Jan 7, 18 6:12 am


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 29260124)
I also ask that the passenger in the window seat open the shades on landing at least half way so one can see if there's fire on that side. Only once did the passenger refuse. She was militant and probably felt she was a lifelong victim of discrimination so she had to insist on her way.

Having all shades open, and for night flights dimming the cabin lights is a policy on a number of airlines.


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 29260124)
Lately, I've been wearing my coat before landing if the weather is very cold and I put some harder to replace things in my pockets, like the phone, keys, ID, and credit cards.

Same for me. ID or passport & CC in my pocket. And shoes on.

nlkm9 Jan 7, 18 7:10 am

I keep my essentials in a bag under my seat for that very reason, its moronic for people to be stopping and opening up overhead bins when theres an emergency. I do agree that those few seconds could mean life or death which is why I keep those items right next to me.

Low Roller Jan 7, 18 7:31 am

Just get out. Always have anything you absolutely need on you (in a pocket or neck wallet) so that you don't have to think. And, always try to sit within a few rows of an exit so that you aren't trapped behind too many idiots.

DesertNomad Jan 7, 18 7:38 am


Originally Posted by abmj-jr (Post 29260025)
I would definitely grab that zipper bag and a coat (if it is cold) as I lined up for the exit.

Which is why I always keep my coat on until we are airborne and anything important is in my vest pocket. I am going to the door directly and not picking anything up along the way. I don't think they drill this into people enough during the safety messages.

CarolynUK Jan 7, 18 9:03 am

That’s one of the problems with allowing so much carry on baggage - passengers have all their belongings in the cabin with them, and don’t realise that the few seconds it takes them to grab their bags is the difference between life and death for those behind them.

safety briefings should emphasis the fact that carry on bags should be left strictly alone in an emergency evacuation -get yourself out quickly and safely, and allow others to do the same

gfunkdave Jan 7, 18 9:10 am

It's been shown that in life-or-death emergencies when seconds count, the vast majority of people simply freeze. Psychologists call it normalcy bias - our higher reasoning functions shut down amidst overloads of ambiguous information and danger and we convince ourselves for precious seconds that everything is fine. Stopping to get your bags is a version of normalcy bias.

Investigators of the Tenerife disaster (where two 747s collided on a runway) found that many people on the PanAm plane died in their seats. Survivors mentioned seeing people sitting calmly in their seats as the plane burned.

There's a really fascinating chapter of David McRaney's book You Are Not So Smart on normalcy bias where he goes into the Tenerife disaster in detail. Highly recommended. He says the way to ensure you are one of the people who gets up and goes is to consciously rehearse what you'd do in an emergency before an emergency happens, so your higher reasoning doesn't have to figure it out in the heat of the moment.

Loren Pechtel Jan 7, 18 9:27 am


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 29260124)
I'll admit that if there were an evacuation, I would consider taking my luggage. It depends if it were an evacuation for legal reasons or a dire emergency. Dire emergency, like the Asiana 777 crash at SFO or US 1549 in the Hudson River, I'd run for my life. If it seems somewhat precautionary, I'd take my luggage because it could be a fight for reimbursement or things that are hard to replace may be lost.

Second this. If I have to leave my luggage I would have serious doubts about whether I would ever see the expensive stuff in it, or compensation for that stuff it was destroyed.

84fiero Jan 7, 18 9:30 am

Some of the offending passengers may be clear headed and simply making a selfish but conscious decision to lug their carryon with them. Others are likely falling victim to a number of psychological factors come into play in panic situations - even those of us who sit here at the keyboard thinking "surely I would/wouldn't do this or that" may or may not react the same in an actual emergency. More should be done to formally study these effects - as they come up in pretty much every such incident - and come up with better ways to address the problem.

Plenty of good articles on the subject such as this:

Let it go, people | Flight Safety Australia

Badenoch Jan 7, 18 9:43 am


Originally Posted by Loren Pechtel (Post 29261434)
Second this. If I have to leave my luggage I would have serious doubts about whether I would ever see the expensive stuff in it, or compensation for that stuff it was destroyed.

Certainly it is your prerogative to risk a gruesome death by fire in an attempt to retrieve your expensive stuff. Don't expect me to do the same while you gather your possessions. You will be moved aside using whatever force is required.

dulciusexasperis Jan 7, 18 10:21 am


Originally Posted by Loren Pechtel (Post 29261434)
Second this. If I have to leave my luggage I would have serious doubts about whether I would ever see the expensive stuff in it, or compensation for that stuff it was destroyed.

I find it amazing to read comments like this by presumably frequent air travellers. Is it a sign of the times when someone would put monetary considerations above living?

There is only ONE answer to the question of what to do if you are told to evacuate. That is to forget everything and just get off as calmly and quickly as possible. When I read of the Toronto incident, I was shocked to read about people trying to get stuff out of the overheads. My first reaction was 'what idiots'. My second was, 'totally selfish behaviour which endangers the lives of others.' My third was, 'did they think differently because they had landed safely and were waiting to get to the gate? Did they have a 'this is a normal arrival' mindset they got stuck in? Did they not realize they were endangering the lives of others and themselves?

LorenPechtel, please take this advice. If you ever hear the cabin crew saying 'EVACUATE', do not hesitate for a second, GET OUT. There is a reason why the evacuation time is set at 90 seconds. That reason is because that is the amount of time in which an airplane can become engulfed in flame. The time it takes for those nearest the fire to be overcome by smoke is even LESS.
https://www.google.ca/search?q=aiarp...hrome&ie=UTF-8

I notice you made a similar comment on the following thread LorenPechtel.
https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/prac...ency-evac.html
Looking at the accompanying photo of that incident, the plane is intact, everyone got off. Note the people with carry-ons on the photo.

Then look at the accompanying photos on this link. The fury over 'hand luggage' plane evacuees - BBC News

Then you tell me LorenPechtel, if you are holding me up from getting off when I am in the front of that plane filling with smoke, would you object if I were to shove you out of the aisle onto the row of seats while you are standing sideways in the aisle getting your 'valuable stuff' out of the overhead bin? Because I can pretty much promise you LorenPechtel, that is what I would do if you were in my way and trying to take stuff with you.

Personally, I think it should be a criminal offense to exit a plane during an evacuation with anything in your hands at all. Possibly an offense like, 'reckless endangerment of others'.

Proudelitist Jan 7, 18 10:32 am

Grabbing your carry on's is a big no-no, and they tell you not to do with very good reason. However as usual people don't listen or care. There was a plane fire evacuation with BA recently and the pics of the pax evacuating with their bags made headlines.

It slows the evacuations, entangles people. catches on the seats, and makes going down the slide a risk too. There is simply no reason to do this. Your life matters more than your stuff.

I keep my passport and my wallet in my pocket during the flight. Everything else can burn. It it can be replaced. This way, if I have to get out I will simply get up and evacuate. I will have my main ID and credit cards for sorting out the mess later.

It may be worthwhile to install auto-locking bins. During an evac, when the flight crew hits the evac alarm button on the flight deck, the bins should auto-lock, preventing anyone from opening the bins.

PAX_fips Jan 7, 18 11:12 am


Originally Posted by Proudelitist (Post 29261681)
It may be worthwhile to install auto-locking bins. During an evac, when the flight crew hits the evac alarm button on the flight deck, the bins should auto-lock, preventing anyone from opening the bins.

Creating obstruction - maybe even more - because the "must have this" will try to force open the OH.

PTravel Jan 7, 18 11:21 am

I don't know if everyone could read the article in the link in my first post. This is what caused me to start this thread:


Originally Posted by Washington Post Article
The conversation over air-traffic control radio was calmer but no less dire. “We’re on fire,” a pilot said in monotone, as reported by Global News. “Mayday, mayday, mayday. We’re evacuating.”

The decision to flee was soon relayed to the back of the plane. A flight attendant went down the aisle repeating: “Evacuate, evacuate.” Not everyone heard, CBC News reported, and only realized they could leave when a man stood up on his seat and yelled that the emergency exit was open.

“Grab your jacket, guys,” a man said in the video.

But even then, several passengers reported that the aisles were blocked by people searching for their overhead bags.

“It was ridiculous,” Alagheband told CBC News. “I was literally yelling, ‘Get the F off the plane.’ ”

Everyone made it off. They slid out of the plane into subfreezing weather, onto an airfield that reeked of burned fumes.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/dr-gridlock/wp/2018/01/06/flames-and-screams-after-two-jetliners-collide-at-toronto-airport/?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories-2_gridlock-collision-615pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.6c95d8033f70

CDTraveler Jan 7, 18 11:25 am


Originally Posted by Annalisa12 (Post 29260068)
Nobody knows what they'd do in an emergency situation.

That's not true.

Like the former LEO in this thread, I know what I'd do, in part because I've experienced an emergency evacuation and because I worked in a field where disaster drills were routine. When you regularly practice for emergencies, your reaction changes from panic to trained and ingrained. At work, the moment the emergency bell went off, every member of the team knew what to do because we all did at least once a month, nobody panicked, and when a real disaster hit (Loma Prieta earthquake) every member of the staff performed as they were trained to do.

My experience with evacuating an aircraft was an RJ that lost all hydraulics. Pilot warned us it would be a hard landing (he could hardly help it, there wasn't a cockpit door and we could hear him on the radio). We diverted to the nearest airport, landed between to two rows of emergency vehicles and the second the FA opened the door nobody had to be told to move rapidly OUT. After the plane was sprayed with foam and inspected by the fire crew, we were allowed to retrieve carry-on bags.

mysterym Jan 7, 18 12:06 pm

I might have to think about retrieving my jacket from the overhead bin before landing so I have it with me. I would not try to grab my bag from there but may grab my bag at my feet that has enough to get me through a day/night of being stranded. I would have no problem shoving folks out of the way trying to retrieve their bags from the overhead bins. Each scenario may vary.

danielonn Jan 7, 18 12:51 pm


Originally Posted by PTravel (Post 29259975)
At Pearson airport today, two jets collided when one being towed hit another that was waiting for a gate. A fire broke out when spilled jet fuel ignited. When smoke started to fill the cabin of the waiting jet, the captain ordered an evacuation -- emergency exits were open and slides were deployed. And the evacuation was slowed by people trying to get their carry-on luggage. Fortunately, no injuries occurred.

If had been a passenger on that plane, I would follow crew member instructions, help children, elderly and disabled pax as best as I could, and throw anyone holding up the process by trying to get their carry-ons out of the way and, if necessary, I'd go right over them. Human lives are worth far more than some fool's possessions.

What would you do?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/dr-gridlock/wp/2018/01/06/flames-and-screams-after-two-jetliners-collide-at-toronto-airport/?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories-2_gridlock-collision-615pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.94f3035cd0a1

I would brace for impact, unbuckle my seatbelt, wait for the EV(Easy Victor Easy Victor) command and crew members instructions and then go low to the ground and follow the lighting to the nearest emergency exit that is available for use and slide down the slide and move away from the aircraft leaving all personal items behind. If its a water evacuation I would put on my vest and wait to inflate it until just before the exiting the aircraft.

It helps to look for where the lifevest is as on some aircrafts its located in the center armrest or under the seat in front of you. I practice buckling and umbuckling my seatbelt a couple of times, count the number of rows to two or three emergency exits.

In fact I look up the seatmap of my aircraft and remember how many exits are next to my seat in front of me and in back of me making a mental note of the exits during the briefing.

Furthermore I look over the emergency evacuation card if I am not familiar with the aircraft and even if I am just to mentally remember what to do when.

I would try and help passengers remain calm the best I could. For me I would not panic and just do what I was taught.

BTW I watch the safety videos online and know that you are supposed to pull down hard on the oxygen mask to start the flow of oxygen.

danielonn Jan 7, 18 12:57 pm


Originally Posted by Proudelitist (Post 29261681)
Grabbing your carry on's is a big no-no, and they tell you not to do with very good reason. However as usual people don't listen or care. There was a plane fire evacuation with BA recently and the pics of the pax evacuating with their bags made headlines.

It slows the evacuations, entangles people. catches on the seats, and makes going down the slide a risk too. There is simply no reason to do this. Your life matters more than your stuff.

I keep my passport and my wallet in my pocket during the flight. Everything else can burn. It it can be replaced. This way, if I have to get out I will simply get up and evacuate. I will have my main ID and credit cards for sorting out the mess later.

It may be worthwhile to install auto-locking bins. During an evac, when the flight crew hits the evac alarm button on the flight deck, the bins should auto-lock, preventing anyone from opening the bins.

I always have my wallet for travel and wear cargo pants with many pockets for my passport, wallet, cellphone etc.

KDS777 Jan 7, 18 1:06 pm

I never travel with anything in my carry on that is not expendable in this scenario.

Gotta love cargo pants.

Having said that, in a serious incident like a real crash, not a minor taxiway shunt like this, I'm not past pushing a kettle or three out of the way when they act stupid.

Pprune has a good read about it. There was no fire on the Westjet aircraft, and that it was the APU in the tail of the empty Sunwing plane burning. Yet, it's like the MSM fake news industry on both sides of the border, have made it out to be major incident.

It's clearly obvious from the video on the Pprune site, and even the pax filming it says............"it's not our plane on fire".

The Westjet crew clearly panicked, broke their own rules (remember safety briefings about not opening the emergency exit if you see fire ???) and dumped the entire pax load onto the tarmac in winter, where it could have been worse if the Sunwing plane had more serious issues.

I realize hindsight is 20/20, but all the crew had to do, and should have done, was maintain control of their situational awareness, ensure that they were was a clear way away from the Sunwing aircraft, and move a bit then wait for emergency services.

https://www.pprune.org/rumours-news/...n-airport.html

danielonn Jan 7, 18 1:08 pm


Originally Posted by mysterym (Post 29262017)
I might have to think about retrieving my jacket from the overhead bin before landing so I have it with me. I would not try to grab my bag from there but may grab my bag at my feet that has enough to get me through a day/night of being stranded. I would have no problem shoving folks out of the way trying to retrieve their bags from the overhead bins. Each scenario may vary.

For me I dress appropriately to my flight so if its winter I am wearing warm clothes and in the summer short sleeve shirts and shorts. The last thing I would be doing is looking for my jacket with other people's items in the bins. 90 seconds is all I have to evacuate and you can be sure I would be getting out as quick as possible.

If I am cold and I survive then so be it but if I die and I have my jacket on then whats the point?

Besides who can guarantee the mechanism of the overhead bins would be operable after an accident?

danielonn Jan 7, 18 1:11 pm


Originally Posted by KDS777 (Post 29262239)
I never travel with anything in my carry on that is not expendable in this scenario.

Gotta love cargo pants.

The best purchase I made was at Costco for comfortable Cargo Pants with a plastic belt that is comfortable and versatile. You can zip it for shorts or wear it like pants. I always layer on a plane and remove it as necessary.

Toshbaf Jan 7, 18 1:21 pm

I posted about taking my luggage because there's a small chance that I'd do that. I'm not stupid and would leave it behind in many cases.

If there's smoke in the cabin, no way am I standing up. Ditto if there if fire outside or pouring smoke. There wouldn't be too many cases where they inflate the slides but it's not too major. Some examples, include

Southwest Airlines 737 nose wheel collapses at LGA. Slides deployed. No fire or smoke. Why not save your luggage?
Southwest Airlines 737 overrun accident at BUR. Slides deployed. No fire or smoke.

On the other hand, I would run for my life when

Black smoke pouring out of an engine of a British Airways 777 at LAS.
Fuselage broken open and flames in the cabin of an Air France A340 after a rough landing and overrun of the runway at YYZ.

No airline wants to say it's ok to get luggage for legal reasons. I would err on the side of leaving luggage if not sure.

Badenoch Jan 7, 18 1:41 pm


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 29262301)
I posted about taking my luggage because there's a small chance that I'd do that. I'm not stupid and would leave it behind in many cases.

If there's smoke in the cabin, no way am I standing up. Ditto if there if fire outside or pouring smoke. There wouldn't be too many cases where they inflate the slides but it's not too major. Some examples, include

Southwest Airlines 737 nose wheel collapses at LGA. Slides deployed. No fire or smoke. Why not save your luggage?
Southwest Airlines 737 overrun accident at BUR. Slides deployed. No fire or smoke.

On the other hand, I would run for my life when

Black smoke pouring out of an engine of a British Airways 777 at LAS.
Fuselage broken open and flames in the cabin of an Air France A340 after a rough landing and overrun of the runway at YYZ.

No airline wants to say it's ok to get luggage for legal reasons. I would err on the side of leaving luggage if not sure.

You don't get to decide what is serious or not in the moment. If the order to evacuate is given follow it. You will not delay my departure pissing around with your stuff. You will be moved aside.

Loren Pechtel Jan 7, 18 1:58 pm


Originally Posted by Badenoch (Post 29261500)
Certainly it is your prerogative to risk a gruesome death by fire in an attempt to retrieve your expensive stuff. Don't expect me to do the same while you gather your possessions. You will be moved aside using whatever force is required.

The issue was when there isn't an obvious imminent threat.

If the plane's on fire, of course you just run for it.

Toshbaf Jan 7, 18 2:03 pm


Originally Posted by Badenoch (Post 29262393)
You don't get to decide what is serious or not in the moment. If the order to evacuate is given follow it. You will not delay my departure pissing around with your stuff. You will be moved aside.

How about the next time someone is slow in boarding? Push them aside! Ha ha ha (actually don't). The problem is a fist fight between passengers would delay evacuation more.

If there were smoke or flames outside, I'd yell to the people ahead of me "go go go go go". It's like when there's an emergency siren in the street. Cars pull over faster when the police announce by bullhorn "pull over to the side". I would guess that the vast majority of the time when slides are deployed, it is time to run out as fast as possible. That hasn't happened to me before. I have been on a flight where passengers deplaned but were told they can leave their luggage inside. I usually ignore them and take my luggage.

spades097 Jan 7, 18 2:04 pm

Some of you need to be reminded that you do not get to make the determination whether or not an emergency exists and the seriousness of the event. You didn't get to decide it yesterday, today, and you won't decide it tomorrow either. You need to repeat over and over again until it sinks in: "I am not in charge while on board an aircraft. I am not in charge while on board an aircraft."

Toshbaf Jan 7, 18 2:10 pm


Originally Posted by Badenoch (Post 29262393)
You don't get to decide what is serious or not in the moment. If the order to evacuate is given follow it. You will not delay my departure pissing around with your stuff. You will be moved aside.

Oops, so sorry my luggage smashed against your head.:D Since you're injured, why prolong life? Just check into hospice. Some will take you even if you don't have a terminal illness.

tentseller Jan 7, 18 2:12 pm

Writing this from Toronto Jan 7/17: I would probably just grab my coat and nothing else.

What use are your medications to you if you are dead?


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