Tip envelopes in rooms

 
Old Jun 17, 14, 7:03 pm
  #46  
 
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Originally Posted by Shareholder View Post

Let's face it, until the US adopts a living wage minimum wage, and we are willing to pay an extra couple of dollars a night to ensure the lowest paid staff get such a wage, then as with wait staff, it becomes the customer who must subsidize the employer by leaving tips for the poorest paid. Unfortunately, the government also "tips" by providing food stamps, medicaid and other support programs because companies like Macdonalds and Walmart won't pay a living wage...surely they are great Corporate Welfare Bums!)
Well said.
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Old Jun 17, 14, 8:01 pm
  #47  
 
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Very surprised any Marriott would allow the use of tip envelopes. This is very tacky!

Personally, I usually leave a tip of a few dollars a day, but that's just me. I understand most people don't tip and as pointed out above, maids make at least minimum wage and so do not have to be tipped.
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Old Jun 17, 14, 8:20 pm
  #48  
 
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Even though I've never seen an envelope, I kind of like the idea. I'm a tipper and many times I've left money on the dresser for the staff who cleans the rooms only to find it still there when I come back.

Bobette
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Old Jun 17, 14, 9:16 pm
  #49  
 
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Many excellent comments and a couple of points not covered. I travel more for business than pleasure and stays average three nights. Although the housekeeper name placard is common, I have only rarely seen a "tips envelope." When I do leave a tip I always leave it in an envelope - usually from the hotel - and write either the maid's name on it or "housekeeping." This eliminates any confusion as to whether it was intended as a tip.

I am an easy guest, neat and clean, and usually inform housekeeping that I don't require daily service. If I do need an extra towel or toiletries I ask. One benefit of knowing the housekeeper's identity is I can greet her by name if I see her in the hallway, and thank her for preparing my room so well. That small gesture of respect and recognition might mean as much as or more than a two-dollar tip.

If the room was exceptionally spotless and well-organized upon arrival, I make a point of telling the GM and / or writing a brief note letting him or her know what a treasure they have employed.
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Old Jun 17, 14, 9:24 pm
  #50  
 
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I read through the entire thread and did not find a single complaint about this. I guess people are afraid to appear cheap. I, for one, feel that I am already paying for my room and its service when I pay the hotel bill. Sorry, maids, but it is up to your employer to pay you, not me.
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Old Jun 17, 14, 9:43 pm
  #51  
 
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Originally Posted by Mooseley View Post
Being a housekeeper is not an easy job.
Neither is being a teacher, a policeman, a TSA agent and so on. Do you tip them?

Originally Posted by Mooseley View Post
Leaving a dollar or two sure adds to a basic wage that is fully earned.
Tautology. Yes, if you give a person a dollar, he/she gets a dollar. That's quite basic math. How is that relevant?

Originally Posted by Mooseley View Post
Think about it, if higher wages were paid the cost of the room would be more.
Yes, think about it after taking Economics 101. Room rates are mostly determined by supply & demand, not by expenses (or do you think during the Superbowl hotel employees' wages jump tenfold and hotels are forced to raise the rates accordingly? )

Big business profits may decrease slightly, and I'm fine with that.

Even if the rates increased, quoting you, are you really going to miss a dollar a day to someone who really deserves it?

I'm really fed up with the absurd idea that if someone works hard and his boss pays him measly wage it somehow becomes client's obligation to add some dollars. And if he doesn't, there comes shaming and name-calling... But no, by some convoluted logic not his boss is a cheapskate, it is absolutely fine if the company earns a couple of millions more by paying minimum wage (or below) to hard working employees... No, turns out the client is at fault here, he is stingy and did not tip!

How can anyone (but the boss) advocate for such a system?!...

Last edited by elva; Jun 18, 14 at 12:45 am
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Old Jun 17, 14, 9:51 pm
  #52  
 
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"Why tip someone for a job I'm capable of doing myself? I can deliver food. I can drive a taxi. I can, and do, cut my own hair. I did however, tip my urologist, because I am unable to pulverize my own kidney stones." - Dwight Schrute
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Old Jun 17, 14, 10:21 pm
  #53  
 
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.....

Last edited by angatol; Feb 28, 15 at 11:34 pm
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Old Jun 18, 14, 12:29 am
  #54  
 
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Originally Posted by elva View Post
Room rates are mostly determined by supply & demand, not by expenses (or do you think during the Superbowl hotel employees' wages jump tenfold and hotels are forced to raise the rates accordingly? )
The rate can't go below the cost though.
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Old Jun 18, 14, 9:08 am
  #55  
 
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[QUOTE=writerguyfl;23012779]Just speculation, but I would guess that a formal tip envelope is there to eliminate the "is that a tip or just money left on the table?" that Housekeepers sometime face. QUOTE]

This. In hotels I have stayed at with the envelope, if I left a tip on the bed or anywhere but in the envelope itself the few dollars will inevitably still be sitting there when I get back to the room.

If I had to guess, there was probably a precipitating event at any hotel that uses these tip envelopes- i.e. some guest claiming that housekeeping "stole" the $2 that the guest just happen to leave sitting out for no apparent reason
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Old Jun 18, 14, 11:59 am
  #56  
 
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Originally Posted by ohmark View Post
Like most of us, I always leave a tip for the room attendant.
Like many, perhaps. Not most. Flyertalk had a census on housekeeping tipping many moons ago. Percentage who tipped was under 30%.
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Old Jun 18, 14, 12:25 pm
  #57  
 
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Most awkward tip environment I have ever witnessed was at the CY in Page AZ.

Very nice breakfast buffet style. The waitperson brought your drinks and left the check.
The hotel seemed to have a large portion of touring Euros who were on a package deal.
The check folio was plopped down on the tables with a very loud"there is no tip included in this total, delivered in a somewhat challenging tone of voice. The entire waitstaff did it the same way.

It felt pretty uncomfortable after the first couple of hearings. Of course it was a buffet anyway, so I'm sure some people weren't sure how much to tip. A a US native, I felt the entire episode was over the top and embarrassing to our foreign guests. We got no comment when our bill was delivered.

Last edited by ivinsfan; Jun 18, 14 at 12:25 pm Reason: spelling
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Old Jun 18, 14, 12:55 pm
  #58  
 
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Originally Posted by ivinsfan View Post
Very nice breakfast buffet style. The waitperson brought your drinks and left the check.

The check folio was plopped down on the tables with a very loud "there is no tip included in this total", delivered in a somewhat challenging tone of voice.

... it was a buffet anyway, so I'm sure some people weren't sure how much to tip.
Did you tip, and if so how much? I'll tip well when warranted, but if the buffet is self-service and the waitperson is just bringing you coffee or a glass of juice, would you really tip 15%-20% on the whole check?

In this case, given the rudeness, I'd be inclined to tip little to nothing, and if need be explain to the manager why.
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Old Jun 18, 14, 3:40 pm
  #59  
 
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Originally Posted by Mooseley View Post
After reading the boards, I wonder what is wrong with some people. Being a housekeeper is not an easy job. Leaving a dollar or two sure adds to a basic wage that is fully earned. It seems the people who worry about tipping a maid, also have a problem with a waiter. Think about it, if higher wages were paid the cost of the room would be more. As far as not being reimbursed are you really going to miss a dollar a day (or more if you are feeling generous) to someone who really deserves it. Believe me after seeing what is expected and accomplished by a maid, I have no qualms about sharing a dollar or two. If your really concerned make it up by taking the soap and shampoo with you. With a tip is just might be replaced everyday, needed or not.
I feel that you GET it. Alot of folks on here make some interesting excuses and justifications for not tipping and it comes down to being cheap and then rationalizing it (just calling it what it is) but to each their own. One dollar truly is nothing to the typical business traveller on per diem and I am quite sure they would not want nor understand the job of being a house keeper. Comparing this to other lines of work is deflection - you are still being cheap and stop sugar coating it. While I do think that writing a kudos or talking to the manager about how nice the room is (and I do it from time to time for an exceptional room) nothing beats "show me the $$$". If you truly do not have cash on hand, that is one thing. I will not comment or infer on the demographics in this forum but I can say that it likely comes into play from those making such anti tipping comments!

Bottom line: If you want to tip, do it, if not, don't try to "justify your actions" of being a cheapo! Admit you are cheap and call it a day!

Here is a great article to help put it in perspective:
http://money.msn.com/saving-money-ti...7-5a2f79590dc6
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Old Jun 18, 14, 4:02 pm
  #60  
 
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Originally Posted by united1kinva View Post
Here is a great article to help put it in perspective:
http://money.msn.com/saving-money-ti...7-5a2f79590dc6
"So, what's an appropriate tip for the person whose task is to keep you safe from bacteria, germs, and other icky things, and earns an average of $10.10 an hour? "

I think this says it all! But lets face it, we know when it comes to cleaning, there are different levels of thoroughness and doing a conscious job. The best are probably not driven by money, like most of our moms!
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