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Dual-Citizen Canadians must have a Canadian Passport to fly to Canada

Dual-Citizen Canadians must have a Canadian Passport to fly to Canada

Old Feb 23, 20, 8:52 am
  #46  
 
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Originally Posted by MB24 View Post
I'm dual Canada/ US and use my Canadian PP to enter Canada and my US PP to enter the States on transborder itineraries. I used to get the occasional question from check-in agents and immigration officials, but fortunately NEXUS has obviated all that...
Based on advice on FT advice (different thread), I have been putting my CDN passport # on the AC file and using my EU passport to enter/exit the other country. Has worked every time. Initially, AC advised me to call prior to my return to Canada flight and they could change the file from the EU passport to the CDN one. I would never do that again because it was impossible to do online checkin and it took the agent almost one hr to check me in at the airport. Of course, these days calling in is almost impossible.
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Old Feb 23, 20, 8:42 pm
  #47  
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Originally Posted by tcook052 View Post
Let's please return this thread to being related to AC or it can be moved to a more appropriate forum for general passport discussion and entry/exit regulations of various countries.

tcook052
Ac forum mod.
I have to agree with tcook052 on this.
My only purpose in raising the question initially was to highlight the problem encountered by the 96 year old man in question.

In particular to highlight the fact that in this case Air Canada was being blamed totally illogically and unfairly for the passenger not having the correct documentation.

There are a number of threads throughout FT referring to dual-citizenships and what can or can't be done, or even "should or shouldn't be done".

It appears that in this case a family member made the travel reservation arrangements and may have been unaware of the documents available as compared with documents actually legally required AT THE TIME OF TRAVEL.

As to dual nationality, it's great, and has huge advantages. My wife and I actually have legal triple citizenships (and current passports for each) and fly with them on AC all the time. Generally on reservations made online directly with AC we use the passport we intend using to enter the destination country - and present that passport at check-in in Canada (we do not use or like OLCI or the kiosks!). Where there is departure immigration check as in Japan we use the same passport that we entered the country on. At AC's check-in counters at HND and NRT we use our Canadian passports.

Japan does not care if OTHER citizens have and use two passports. One astute departure immigration lady at HND (located AFTER AC check-in) was perplexed that our Irish passports seemingly when we are going TO Canada had no ETA stamps looked up at us with a frown and a smile and said "Double?" We happily showed her our Canadian passports and had absolutely no problems.

Not having the correct documents is not Air Canada's fault. It is always the traveller's obligation to be properly prepared.

Unfortunately the 96 year old man in question received either incorrect or incomplete advice.
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Old Feb 23, 20, 8:57 pm
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Straight from the horse's mouth:
Dual Canadian citizens can no longer travel to or transit through Canada by air with a non-Canadian passport. You need a valid Canadian passport to board your flight.
If your country needs you to enter and exit that country using a passport issued by its government, you will still need a valid Canadian passport to board your flight to Canada. Make sure to carry both passports when you travel.
Dual Canadian citizens need a valid Canadian passport

Originally Posted by dav662 View Post
You have to use the Canadian passport to get out and get into Canada.
Not true, or at least not consistently true. When checking in for flights from Canada to Europe our family quite regularly uses EU passports at checkin. Only once within the last year or so did a checkin agent enquire about our Canadian passports.

Assuming your son is also a Japanese citizen, he can likely apply for a "special authorization":
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration...it-canada.html
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Last edited by tcook052; Feb 23, 20 at 9:07 pm
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Old Feb 23, 20, 9:10 pm
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Originally Posted by kumagoro View Post
Hi;

Thanks for the quick reply. To me there is a certain sad irony in the law forcing a Canadian citizen by birth, who was born in Canada to a Canadian citizen father, to renounce his Canadian citizenship in order to legally visit the country of his birth.

I wrote to my local MP about it and they were less than helpful. All they did was refer me to the government's website on the law as it stands. Other than that, they had no helpful information.

He can easily get a Canadian passport issued here in Japan as he has an Ontario birth certificate, etc. However it is a risk if it is found by anyone. In Japan the law says that a person must choose a citizenship by age 22 and renounce any other citizenship than Japanese. However, there is no penalty and no specific way to renounce other citizenships.

Also, Japanese passports don't list a place of birth, which is handy. Up to now (when he was a child) we simply got him a Japanese passport only and he used it whenever we visited Canada. I guess we'll just do the same thing in the future. I don't like having to break the law like this, but when the law is an ... there isn't much alternative.
Your son can likely apply for a "special authorization":
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration...it-canada.html
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Old Feb 23, 20, 10:34 pm
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Originally Posted by blue2002 View Post
Your son can likely apply for a "special authorization":
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration...it-canada.html
Hi, thanks for the link.

However, again the link refers to "carrying both passports". My son, due to Japanese law, is not able to get a Canadian passport issued. As soon as he does, he is in contravention of Japanese law and puts himself in danger of losing Japanese citizenship. If airport security or customs in Japan were to discover his Canadian passport (should he somehow obtain one) he would also be in potential legal trouble. Hence the Catch-22. To apply for special authorization, again he needs two passports.

A dual citizen without a Canadian passport is in legal limbo and not permitted to enter Canada if they are unable to get a Canadian passport before they travel. The Canadian government, and by extension Air Canada, is putting such people in a really difficult position. They basically have to choose which country's law to break if they want to travel.
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Old Feb 23, 20, 10:55 pm
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If he were to get a Canadian passport, for future trips would it be possible to travel via a 3rd country such as the USA and have him pick up the passport there? Would the risk be significantly reduced if he never has the physical Canadian passport in Japan?
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Old Feb 23, 20, 10:57 pm
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Originally Posted by YEG USER View Post
If he were to get a Canadian passport, for future trips would it be possible to travel via a 3rd country such as the USA and have him pick up the passport there? Would the risk be significantly reduced if he never has the physical Canadian passport in Japan?
It wojld, but getting a,passport in the first place is effectively impossible in Japan.
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Old Feb 23, 20, 11:34 pm
  #53  
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Originally Posted by kumagoro View Post
Hi, thanks for the link.

However, again the link refers to "carrying both passports". My son, due to Japanese law, is not able to get a Canadian passport issued. As soon as he does, he is in contravention of Japanese law and puts himself in danger of losing Japanese citizenship. If airport security or customs in Japan were to discover his Canadian passport (should he somehow obtain one) he would also be in potential legal trouble. Hence the Catch-22. To apply for special authorization, again he needs two passports.

A dual citizen without a Canadian passport is in legal limbo and not permitted to enter Canada if they are unable to get a Canadian passport before they travel. The Canadian government, and by extension Air Canada, is putting such people in a really difficult position. They basically have to choose which country's law to break if they want to travel.
I donít think the airlines can assert heís a Canadian citizen, even by Place Of Birth (after all, you can always claim your husbandís a diplomat).

Its CBSA where you may have a problem.

Besides your MP, have you written to the Canadian Embassy Tokyo on how to resolve this? Your son canít be the first dual national minor.

Last edited by percysmith; Feb 23, 20 at 11:49 pm
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Old Feb 23, 20, 11:37 pm
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Originally Posted by kumagoro View Post
However, again the link refers to "carrying both passports". My son, due to Japanese law, is not able to get a Canadian passport issued. As soon as he does, he is in contravention of Japanese law and puts himself in danger of losing Japanese citizenship. If airport security or customs in Japan were to discover his Canadian passport (should he somehow obtain one) he would also be in potential legal trouble. Hence the Catch-22. To apply for special authorization, again he needs two passports.

A dual citizen without a Canadian passport is in legal limbo and not permitted to enter Canada if they are unable to get a Canadian passport before they travel. The Canadian government, and by extension Air Canada, is putting such people in a really difficult position. They basically have to choose which country's law to break if they want to travel.
How is Air Canada or even the Canadian government putting your son in a difficult position? Is he not already breaking Japanese law by remaining a Canadian citizen? Even if there's no penalty, you say "[i]n Japan the law says that a person must choose a citizenship by age 22 and renounce any other citizenship than Japanese".

If he obeyed Japanese law and renounced his Canadian citizenship, the Canadian government would no long require him to enter Canada on a Canadian passport and AC would only ask him for an eTA with his Japanese passport.

As far as I can tell, the only organization putting your son in a difficult position in the Japanese government with their policy of only having one citizenship.
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Old Feb 23, 20, 11:42 pm
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Originally Posted by dav662 View Post
You have to use the Canadian passport to get out and get into Canada. Even though API is required you can use another passport to enter another country.
However, when exiting that particular country at airline check in, if returning to Canada then you have to use the Canadian passport. But at immigration at departure of that country, you use the same passport you used to enter that particular country. It's not an issue for dual passport holders.
Not true. When I fly to Jamaica I use my Jamaican passport on the outbound from Canada (with no issues, and AC clears it every time), and on the return to Canada I use my Canadian. Just makes processing in MBJ and KIN much easier to enter on the Jamaican passport.
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Old Feb 24, 20, 12:06 am
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Originally Posted by LondonElite View Post
This is simply untrue.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_Nationality_Rule ?
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Old Feb 24, 20, 12:20 am
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Originally Posted by Adam Smith View Post
How is Air Canada or even the Canadian government putting your son in a difficult position? Is he not already breaking Japanese law by remaining a Canadian citizen? Even if there's no penalty, you say "n Japan the law says that a person must choose a citizenship by age 22 and renounce any other citizenship than Japanese".

If he obeyed Japanese law and renounced his Canadian citizenship, the Canadian government would no long require him to enter Canada on a Canadian passport and AC would only ask him for an eTA with his Japanese passport.

As far as I can tell, the only organization putting your son in a difficult position in the Japanese government with their policy of only having one citizenship.

Let' s just say that the law in Japan is...complicated. A bit of a "don't ask don't tell" kind of situation, to put it very simply

There is no official action taken against people who happen to have two citizenships. They are deemed Japanese as long as they live in Japan UNLESS they actively pursue the second one. Being caught with a second passport would certainly be seen as actively pursuing.

So, the only action I can see that is a way out is if my son officially renounces his Canadian citizenship through the Canadian government. This is a time consuming andmoney consuming process. And would not solve the problem is he were asked "where were you born?" by a CBP officer. I guess he would have to carry a "Renunciation Card" (if there is such a thing) at all times.

I think the whole thing frankly is a cash grab on the part of the government of Canada. They want to sell untold thousands of passports to dual citizens in the guise of 'security'. There is no security risk for a Japanese/Canadian or German/Candian or British/Canadian dual citizen entering Canada using their other passport at all.
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Old Feb 24, 20, 12:40 am
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Maybe just fly to the USA and then cross into Canada at a land crossing. AFAIK Canadian citizens don't require a passport to enter Canada by land or sea. If there is are any other documents already possessed that show citizenship, that would suffice to enter Canada.

As another poster mentioned, reach out to the Canadian embassy. Your situation can't be unique.
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Old Feb 24, 20, 1:04 am
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Originally Posted by kumagoro View Post
So, the only action I can see that is a way out is if my son officially renounces his Canadian citizenship through the Canadian government. This is a time consuming andmoney consuming process. And would not solve the problem is he were asked "where were you born?" by a CBP officer. I guess he would have to carry a "Renunciation Card" (if there is such a thing) at all times.
UKVI issues renunciation letters to Australians who become Australian MPs https://independentaustralia.net/pol...e-office,11066 or HKers who become officials.

I suppose IRCC can issue such a letter, but your son wonít have to physically carry it with him. He just has to carry a copy on his phone, and CBSA can internally verify the letter if they question his lack of Canadian passport.

IANAL but I donít believe your son should be made to renounce before coming of age - it is his decision to make, not one the Japanese Government can force you to make on his behalf.
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Old Feb 24, 20, 2:07 am
  #60  
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Originally Posted by kumagoro View Post
Hi, thanks for the link.

However, again the link refers to "carrying both passports". My son, due to Japanese law, is not able to get a Canadian passport issued. As soon as he does, he is in contravention of Japanese law and puts himself in danger of losing Japanese citizenship. If airport security or customs in Japan were to discover his Canadian passport (should he somehow obtain one) he would also be in potential legal trouble. Hence the Catch-22. To apply for special authorization, again he needs two passports.

A dual citizen without a Canadian passport is in legal limbo and not permitted to enter Canada if they are unable to get a Canadian passport before they travel. The Canadian government, and by extension Air Canada, is putting such people in a really difficult position. They basically have to choose which country's law to break if they want to travel.
Shouldn't we put blame where it really is? Real issue seems to me that your son is in violation of Japanese laws. If he was to continue retaining the two citizenships, then he is taking the risk, and he should not \blame Canadian laws, which are not unreasonable, or airlines, which are obviously expected to follow the law.

Issue is not having two passports but having two citizenships, really. Anyway, I don't really see what this has to do with AC.
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