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Old Jan 3, 11, 5:28 pm
  #16  
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Originally Posted by gordo6 View Post
I was writing only about TLV-NA direct flights...
Surely you meant to write "non-stop flights."

Direct flights keep the same flight numbers and planes but stop at airports en-route while some passengers exit and others board or remain seated on the plane.

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Old Jan 4, 11, 1:13 am
  #17  
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Originally Posted by TWA884 View Post
Surely you meant to write "non-stop flights."

Direct flights keep the same flight numbers and planes but stop at airports en-route while some passengers exit and others board or remain seated on the plane.

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Not entirely true. Continental's flight 90, for example, is a direct flight from LAX to TLV, with both a stopover AND an equipment change in EWR (from a 737-900ER to a 777-200ER). Direct flights in reality have no connection to whether or not the plane remains the same, as frequently they involve equipment change. The reason for keeping the same number has something to do with how the flights appear on searches and/or landing spots.
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Old Jan 4, 11, 12:31 pm
  #18  
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Originally Posted by joshwex90 View Post
Not entirely true. Continental's flight 90, for example, is a direct flight from LAX to TLV, with both a stopover AND an equipment change in EWR (from a 737-900ER to a 777-200ER). Direct flights in reality have no connection to whether or not the plane remains the same, as frequently they involve equipment change. The reason for keeping the same number has something to do with how the flights appear on searches and/or landing spots.
From the site I linked above:
"A direct flight only means that you are on a flight that will take you to your destination without having to change planes. There will be a stop on the way…. maybe two, but you will almost always stay on the same aircraft.

"In rare instances, you may have the same flight number, but you will have to change planes. This can happen if the airline has to change aircraft for operational reasons…

"If you booked a flight from the U.S. to Europe as a direct flight from, say San Francisco through an East Coast City to London, you may have to get off the aircraft and re-board at another gate. Your direct flight may have the same flight number for both segments, but maybe there is a larger aircraft for that longer segment, or the airline agents may have to check your documents."
CO90 is one of those rare instances. On Southwest, for example, you can fly cross country on one plane with one flight number and make as many as three or four stops en-route.

Regardless, the OP was referring to non-stop flights when he wrote direct.
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Old Jan 4, 11, 3:15 pm
  #19  
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Originally Posted by TWA884 View Post
From the site I linked above:
"A direct flight only means that you are on a flight that will take you to your destination without having to change planes. There will be a stop on the way…. maybe two, but you will almost always stay on the same aircraft.

"In rare instances, you may have the same flight number, but you will have to change planes. This can happen if the airline has to change aircraft for operational reasons…

"If you booked a flight from the U.S. to Europe as a direct flight from, say San Francisco through an East Coast City to London, you may have to get off the aircraft and re-board at another gate. Your direct flight may have the same flight number for both segments, but maybe there is a larger aircraft for that longer segment, or the airline agents may have to check your documents."
CO90 is one of those rare instances. On Southwest, for example, you can fly cross country on one plane with one flight number and make as many as three or four stops en-route.

Regardless, the OP was referring to non-stop flights when he wrote direct.
I'm not so sure how rare it is. CO has many flights to international destinations, but virtually all are routed through IAH or EWR. They have many direct flights that change equipment in the hub. And they're hardly the only airline. Unfortunately, this is becoming a more frequent practice
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Old Jan 5, 11, 8:07 am
  #20  
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Originally Posted by TWA884 View Post
Regardless, the OP was referring to non-stop flights when he wrote direct.
I have edited the original post to clarify the issue.
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Old Jan 5, 11, 9:11 am
  #21  
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Originally Posted by joshwex90 View Post
I'm not so sure how rare it is. CO has many flights to international destinations, but virtually all are routed through IAH or EWR. They have many direct flights that change equipment in the hub. And they're hardly the only airline. Unfortunately, this is becoming a more frequent practice
You are making a global generalization based upon anecdotal evidence from one U.S. based airline.

The common definition of a direct flight is:
BusinessDictionary.com

Air travel that carries a single flight number but (unlike a non-stop flight) involves one or more stopovers although it (unlike an indirect flight) does not involve a change of aircraft.
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Old Jan 5, 11, 10:05 am
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Originally Posted by joshwex90 View Post
You kid about the menu, and while it's not worth a difference of $1,000, there is what to be said about getting a true Biz Class dining experience on LY (for those who keep Kosher,) which is unavailable on other airlines.
And of course this link, LY misses the point of 'Premium' in Premium Travel, starting especially from Post 11, where ebzed does feel it's worth it to spend the money on LY premium cabins. You should probably ask him for some advice
On LH and LX, for some routen when flying in C and F, you do get a premium class kosher meal. LY no longer has a monopoly. But on other airlines,.... I flew recently with TG, and my KSML tasted horrible.

Last edited by HONcircle; Jan 6, 11 at 12:00 pm
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Old Jan 6, 11, 6:05 am
  #23  
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Originally Posted by TWA884 View Post
You are making a global generalization based upon anecdotal evidence from one U.S. based airline.

The common definition of a direct flight is:
But your quote says that a direct flight does not involve an equipment change, and even if rare, that's not 100% accurate. Besides, it's not one airline. Google "does a direct flight involve change in aircraft" or variants, and you'll see it's becoming an all too common practice, much to the chagrin of pax (including the fact that you get fewer miles, because you get the total of A-C, not A-B + B-C). US does it, UA, AC, DL... I don't know about European airlines, but don't forget that UA/CO make the largest airline in the world, and they do it; DL is number 2 (and currently the single largest until CO and UA combine) and they do it...

I think the point is irrelevant though. It doesn't change the fact that it exists, and I think we can agree it's annoying and pointless. It's also not really connected to the thread anymore

Originally Posted by HONcircle View Post
On LH and LX, for some routen when flying in C and F, you do get a premium class kodher meal. LY no longer has a monopoly. But on other airlines,.... I flew recently with TG, and my KSML tasted horrible.
I think you misunderstood. Many airlines will serve high quality KSMLs in F. But only on LY can Kosher pax get the F dining "experience," served course after course, directly from the warmers, not wrapped in a bunch of plastic or metal, poured wine...
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Old Jan 6, 11, 6:13 am
  #24  
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Perhaps we can go back on topic and discuss the whole pricing thing which this thread is actually about?
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Old Jan 6, 11, 1:38 pm
  #25  
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Originally Posted by joshwex90 View Post
But your quote says that a direct flight does not involve an equipment change, and even if rare, that's not 100% accurate.
I wrote "common" (emphasis added) definition, not absolute or exclusive definition.
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Old Jan 6, 11, 5:14 pm
  #26  
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Originally Posted by TWA884 View Post
I wrote "common" (emphasis added) definition, not absolute or exclusive definition.
Sorry, missed that *sheepish grin*
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Old Jan 20, 11, 7:43 am
  #27  
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Originally Posted by JohnnieZ View Post
The cheapest ticket in LY is $4,200!
Interestingly, LY's price dropped to around $2,900.
Both prices were for R/T in W.

Also interesting (for some, maybe) is that the difference between S and W is $7...

Last edited by JohnnieZ; Jan 20, 11 at 7:51 am
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Old Jan 20, 11, 9:47 am
  #28  
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Originally Posted by JohnnieZ View Post
the difference between S and W is $7
Pretty common really that a full fare Economy (well almost full fare) would cost the same, or very often more than the cheapest and most restricted Business fare.
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Old Jan 20, 11, 10:26 am
  #29  
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Originally Posted by clubman View Post
Pretty common really that a full fare Economy (well almost full fare) would cost the same, or very often more than the cheapest and most restricted Business fare.
I believe that a Y fare is always more expensive on CO than a Z fare.
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Old Jan 20, 11, 5:44 pm
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There are often fare anomalies. About 4.5 years ago there was a time when you could fly TLV-HKG on A class for less than the price of a D class ticket! Go work that one out! It turned out to be the result of a quiet fare war between BA and LY on that route.
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