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"American" food from a non-U.S. perspective?

"American" food from a non-U.S. perspective?

Old Jul 10, 09, 2:43 pm
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"American" food from a non-U.S. perspective?

If you live in the United States, it would not be uncommon to say "Let's go out for Mexican/Chinese/Vietnamese/whatever." **

You pretty much have an idea of what that means and what kind of food and dishes will be served when you say that.

Question: Do folks in other countries say "Let's go out for 'American food'"? And if so, what is pretty well understood as the kinds of things you expect to be eating?

**Note: Yes, I understand that Mexican/Chinese/whatever as it is typically served in the U.S. is not "authentic." Let's use another thread for that debate. I'm simply talking about what one commonly expects in the U.S. when going out to eat X ethnic food.
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Old Jul 10, 09, 3:03 pm
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Hard to say and my answer stands only for me. Yes, here in Germany there are places with "American food" (I don't mean McDonalds, Pizza Hut, Subways etc.). There are some good American Sports Bars which serve real Burgers, Chicken Wings, Spareribs, Club Sandwiches and other in my opinion typical American food. You find these places mainly in areas with large US Army installations and of course they are popular with GIs.
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Old Jul 10, 09, 3:30 pm
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I can't think anyone would suggest going for 'American' in the UK. It is simply not a cusine type, unlike the much loved Indian.

However, in the unlikely event of some doing so the assumption would be some form of burger or diner type food along TGIF lines. Tex Mex has a following too but a distinct identity. Otherwise, most people associate US food with McDonalds. You think we have bad food, but really we know you do.
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Old Jul 10, 09, 4:13 pm
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American restaurants in Germany

I agree with caspritz78 on the situation in Germany.

In addition to the American Sports Bars he mentioned I would add:

- American Diner style restaurants (serving real hamburgers, one or two sorts of steaks, salads, sandwiches, spareribs etc.)
- American steak houses (though very rare)

In most larger cities youŽd find American restaurants / restaurant chains in the yellow pages, e.g. "Louisiana" being one of the largest.
(Even Planet Hollywood opened a couple of restaurants in Germany some years ago, but wasnŽt too successful)

IMO most people would rather go to American style restaurants because of the whole experience (entertainment, "lifestyle", food) rather than the culinary experience.
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Old Jul 10, 09, 4:40 pm
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In Australia there's no real concept of American food. Except McDonalds and their ilk.

Audrey
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Old Jul 10, 09, 5:17 pm
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Originally Posted by Jasper2009 View Post
- American steak houses (though very rare)

In most larger cities youŽd find American restaurants / restaurant chains in the yellow pages, e.g. "Louisiana" being one of the largest.
I agree. American steak houser are very rare. Argentinean steaks are more common in Germany. I also agree on Louisiana. Even if I'm not sure if it is real American food.
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Old Jul 10, 09, 5:50 pm
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The few places I remember in Europe that served REAL American food did not last long. Applebees tried with several restaurants, and they all closed. I saw Wendy's come and go, Arby's lasted 2 months, and a really autentic diner joint closed after a year.
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Old Jul 10, 09, 6:24 pm
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On my last trips to Germany I saw "Subway" in several towns. Do the Germans consider this as "American food"?
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Old Jul 10, 09, 10:14 pm
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Thanksgiving Day at Harry's Bar in Venice is always a big deal for many local affluent Venetians. I have enjoyed Thanksgiving dinner for several years at Harry's and it is a very traditional Thanksgiving feast, albeit, a lot better than my mother served. Always surprised to see the restaurant filled with mostly Venetians, looking for that great turkey dinner. Very few Americans. Then again, there aren't many American tourists in Venice in late November.
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Old Jul 10, 09, 11:08 pm
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Originally Posted by falconea View Post
In Australia there's no real concept of American food. Except McDonalds and their ilk.

Audrey
I remember an Outback Steakhouse across from our motel in Campbelltown. Surely that qualifies as American food!
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Old Jul 10, 09, 11:08 pm
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When I host foreigners, hamburgers aside, one of their main ideas of what American food is, "I want a big, tender steak!"
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Old Jul 11, 09, 5:19 am
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Originally Posted by jackal View Post
I remember an Outback Steakhouse across from our motel in Campbelltown. Surely that qualifies as American food!
Is that just off the M4? I saw one the day on the way from Merrylands to the city and almost died of laughter (and the bronchitis I had at the time). I don't mind outback, my fiancee (well her best friend) took me to one when I was visiting her in San Antonio. Somehow I don't think it works in Sydney!

I think Steak Places would qualify in Australia, Lone Star certainly bills itself as an American Steak House. Apart from that it'd be franchises that originated in the USA, and Hungry Jacks which is the Australian version of BK (legal stuff forced the name change)
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Old Jul 11, 09, 6:06 am
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What would be called Tex-Mex in America is called Mexican in Australia and would usually not be associated with America.

I think there's a Hooters in Parramatta although I don't usually venture that far west.

There's a Tony Roma's too which would also classify as American. Personally I think "American" food is probably too heavy and rich to ever be considered anything but fast food over here.

Australia is much like the United States in that a lot of the food we do well is not from Australia, like Thai and Vietnamese. I guess the same is true of British cuisine and Indian.

Although I could go a shrimp poboy right about now.
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Old Jul 11, 09, 6:39 am
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Originally Posted by Omnivore View Post
Is that just off the M4? I saw one the day on the way from Merrylands to the city and almost died of laughter (and the bronchitis I had at the time).
This one was in Leumeah, just a block west of the railway station.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...h&z=16&iwloc=A

We didn't eat there, choosing more often instead (well, three times throughout the week) to eat at the MUCH more authentically Australian Red Rooster. (Hey, it beats any chicken place in the U.S., including Chick-Fil-A! )
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Old Jul 11, 09, 9:51 am
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I think Fat Ammy's in "Wee Britain" typifies the non-US view of American-style dining.
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