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Old Sep 16, 2022, 12:28 pm
  #781  
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Looking at the Flyaway kids bed I would say no.
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Old Sep 16, 2022, 12:35 pm
  #782  
 
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Originally Posted by TribalistMeathead
We have tickets to fly ORD-LHR-ORD in December with our four-year-old and I think a seat extender such as the Flyaway Kids Bed would be the perfect solution. Is use of a product such as this one a firm "no" across the entire airline, or is it permitted with the approval of the crew on some occasions? We are currently slated to travel on the A350 and this assumes the seat extender would be in a window seat in WT (and not in an exit row).

Thanks!
Hi, unfortunately for you the product you describe is not approved for use on British Airways flights at this time. Only an approved car seat would be allowed for that age category, ie. Its forward facing, has a three point harness for the child and can be secured to the seat through the back of the frame using the seatbelt.
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Old Sep 16, 2022, 3:23 pm
  #783  
 
Join Date: May 2017
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Thanks, CIHY and Flier74 - I did read the relevant page on ba.com, but wasn't sure if it was a "never allowed" thing or an "occasionally they'll look the other way" thing.
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Old Sep 21, 2022, 4:11 pm
  #784  
 
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How often do you have to refuse people boarding as they are obviously drunk? Who decides? Asking as I once had a terrible flight sitting behind drunk and very smelly people, luckily not on BA.
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Old Sep 21, 2022, 6:23 pm
  #785  
 
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Drunks should not get to the aircraft, they should not get past the gate staff, but they do. It is down to the SCCM, who has the auth to refuse boarding. The problem is that it can be hard to detect someone who is a problem from someone who has had a gin in the lounge and is going to fall asleep🤪 We do not want a drunk onboard as the cabin altitude exasperates the situation and someone who is a little merry at boarding can become a major headache later, but often they dont. Someone who is determined can get very drunk quickly, I did a flight from GLA to LGW then onto PMI, by the time we got to LGW some few gentlemen who had brought on a bottle of water were so drunk they couldnt do up a seat belt and had to be carried off the plane by the Police, the water was duty free vodka they had decanted into a water bottle.
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Old Sep 21, 2022, 7:30 pm
  #786  
 
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By the looks at their own website, BA are in 'discussions' to evaluate whether it can be used.

https://www.flyawaydesigns.com/pages/airlines
I noticed if you scroll down there are a list of airlines as a firm no.
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Old Sep 22, 2022, 12:14 am
  #787  
 
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Originally Posted by Waterhorse
I did a flight from GLA to LGW then onto PMI, by the time we got to LGW some few gentlemen who had brought on a bottle of water were so drunk they couldnt do up a seat belt and had to be carried off the plane by the Police, the water was duty free vodka they had decanted into a water bottle.
Ah, the class and sophistication of the flying public
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Old Sep 22, 2022, 1:49 am
  #788  
 
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Be wary of drinking too much alcohol on a flight. I had a passenger on a PRG-STN flight drink half a bottle of Absynthe. On arrival at STN he was ambulanced off to Harlow hospital where he sadly died of alcoholic poisoning shortly after admission.
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Old Sep 22, 2022, 3:40 am
  #789  
 
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Originally Posted by rapidex
Be wary of drinking too much alcohol on a flight. I had a passenger on a PRG-STN flight drink half a bottle of Absynthe. On arrival at STN he was ambulanced off to Harlow hospital where he sadly died of alcoholic poisoning shortly after admission.
I barely drink these days, so even two G&Ts on the plane can make me feel ropey. I always find it a dilemma even accepting the welcome champagne as I like to make sure I can get the laptop out for the first 2 hours in a flight before food is served. Once that happens I'll settle and watch a movie and then try and get a nap!

To be fair though, crew can make things worse 😂 Once I boarded the A380 to Vancouver (I think?) and was upstairs. The crew member was struggling to open the champagne bottles and I volunteered to help. She then came over with a different and longer champagne glass (no idea what that came from) and promptly kept me topped up. At one point she left half a bottle. I felt so rough an hour before landing. Couldn't eat the second meal. Learned a lesson there!
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Old Sep 22, 2022, 5:29 am
  #790  
 
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Originally Posted by rapidex
Be wary of drinking too much alcohol on a flight. I had a passenger on a PRG-STN flight drink half a bottle of Absynthe. On arrival at STN he was ambulanced off to Harlow hospital where he sadly died of alcoholic poisoning shortly after admission.
Drinking half a bottle of absinthe is not a good idea even when not on a flight. Even the reformulated stuff without the wormwood!
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Old Sep 23, 2022, 5:49 am
  #791  
 
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Missed approach frequency

Never experienced a go-around flying 70k miles a year for last 10 years, but today experienced my 3rd missed approach on BA this year alone (so far). Is there something going on here in terms of the frequency of missed approaches?
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Old Sep 23, 2022, 6:35 am
  #792  
 
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Originally Posted by firstlight
Never experienced a go-around flying 70k miles a year for last 10 years, but today experienced my 3rd missed approach on BA this year alone (so far). Is there something going on here in terms of the frequency of missed approaches?
No, just random chance
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Old Sep 23, 2022, 8:05 am
  #793  
 
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Pre-Covid the daily average hovered around 1.5 per day, on an annual basis for the ten years before 2020.

I havent got the figures to hand but I dont believe weve quite got back to that level.

For context, LHR reached record 1395 daily movements in 2019, average was something like 1350.

We got up to about 1250 in June I think, but are now around 1150 daily average.
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Old Sep 23, 2022, 8:14 am
  #794  
 
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Originally Posted by Heathrow Tower
Pre-Covid the daily average hovered around 1.5 per day, on an annual basis for the ten years before 2020.

I havent got the figures to hand but I dont believe weve quite got back to that level.

For context, LHR reached record 1395 daily movements in 2019, average was something like 1350.

We got up to about 1250 in June I think, but are now around 1150 daily average.
I was on ba709 this morning from ZRH, had to take off after the rear wheels had touched down...
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Old Sep 23, 2022, 8:59 am
  #795  
 
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Originally Posted by firstlight
I was on ba709 this morning from ZRH, had to take off after the rear wheels had touched down...
The wheels can touch down in a go around, or a baulked landing. If it becomes evident that for whatever reason that the touchdown and rollout might not be the best option then a late go-around (called a baulked landing) will be carried out. Then the inertia of the aircraft may result in a touching of the wheels before the engine power bites and the aircraft starts to climb away. Jet engines can take a while to spool up, the modern big fans are better than older earlier engines but it can still take a little while. Jet engines provide thrust in a non linear fashion, very little thrust is produced until the engines get to high rpm percentages, as I said less so than in the past but many aircraft used to have very big flap settings mainly for drag, to keep the thrust higher in the final stages of the approach. This extra drag needs higher power settings on the engine allowing faster engine response in the event of a go around close to the ground. If you remember BA38 the captain raised one stage of flap (the drag flap) which enabled the aircraft to land on the airfield.

Last edited by Waterhorse; Sep 27, 2022 at 6:15 am
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