"New" Orly - April 2019

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Orly FAQ

This wikipost keeps track of the different changes at Orly and to provide guidance to passengers traveling through Orly.

Terminals:
Since end of March, the old names for the two Orly terminals (Ouest/West and Sud/South) have been changed and Orly reorganized into a single terminal with four departure areas.
They are as following:

Orly 1 (Ex Ouest Hall 1 & 2):
Orly 1 is comprised of two boarding areas and two check-in areas, which do not change from what people have seen with Halls 1 and 2. The distribution is as follows:

Check-in areas 11, 12 & 14:
Alitalia, Iberia, TAP, Vueling, Air Malta

Check-in areas 15, 16, 17 & 18:
Air France & Air France HOP
SkyPriority check-in area 18

Boarding Area A:
Alitalia, Iberia, TAP Vueling, Air Malta, some Air France HOP regional flights
A contract lounge (accepts Priority Pass and SkyTeam credentials) is available downstairs by gates A01-A05 straight after security to the left.

Boarding Area B:
Air France (most mainline flights) and some Air France HOP regional flights
The Air France Lounge is located one floor up straight after security.

Orly 2 (Ex Ouest halls 3 & 4):
Note : as of Sept 2020, Orly 2 is still closed (due to covid-19).
This departure area is comprised of two boarding areas, both named C-Gates, divided in a Schengen and Non-Schengen section.

Check-in Area 24:
Air Europa

Check-in Area 26:
EasyJet

Boarding Area C (Schengen Gates C11-C12 & C21-C27):
Air Europa
EasyJet

Boarding Area C (Non-Schengen Gates C14-C20):
Currently not in service, may be converted into Schengen gates

Orly 3 (New junction building):
This building links Orly 1/2 (ex-West) and Orly 4 (ex-South). This departure area is comprised of a single check-in area and security filter, with the split between gates E (Schengen) and D (Non-Schengen) happening after security and shopping areas. Check-in area assignments for areas 34 & 35 are based mostly on observation and day-to-day data.

Check-in Area 32:
Air France long-haul and SkyPriority check-in
Pegasus

Check-in Area 33:
Air France flights to Corsica, Air Corsica

Check-in Area 34:
Transavia Schengen-based flights

Check-in Area 35:
Transavia Non-Schengen and Level

Boarding Area D (Non-Schengen):
Transavia, Air France, Pegasus, Level
Temporary Air France lounge located by D11/E04

Boarding Area E (Schengen):
Air France (Corsica), Air Corsica and Transavia
This boarding area is also accessible from Orly 4.

Orly 4 (ex-South):
This terminal has now become a primarily Non-Schengen terminal with the bulk of airlines operating non-schengen flights. The E gates (formerly B gates i believe) are accessible from Orly 4.
Airlines operating from this terminal:
Royal Air Maroc, Rossiya, Corsair, Tunisair, TUIfly, Air Algerie, La Compagnie, Norwegian, Frenchbee, Air Caraibes

Boarding Area F (former A-Gates):
Royal Air Maroc, Rossiya, Corsair, Tunisair, TUIfly, Air Algerie, La Compagnie, Frenchbee, Air Caraibes

Boarding Area E (Former B-Gates and Orly 3):
Norwegian

How do i transfer at Orly?
Due to Orly undergoing significant change with the new junction building, the transfers will become easier and finally airside connections will become possible. This section will therefore evolve as more information becomes available.

You are arriving at the A-Gates:
At the moment, only an A to A connection is possible airside. If connecting to another flight at the A-Gates, you will need to turn left and head upstairs if arriving at gates A12-A17 (this seems to be a temporary arrangement while construction is ongoing), or you will arrive directly into the gate area. If you leave from any other departure area, you must leave the secure area and re-clear security.

You are arriving at the B-Gates:
You will arrive directly on the upper level from which you can either head down to arrivals, or follow the signs towards the right for C (5 mins), D, E (10 mins) & F gates (15-20 mins). If connecting to a flight at the A-Gates, you must head down to arrivals, then back up to departures and re-clear security.

You are arriving at the C-Gates (Non-Schengen)
This area is currently not in service.

You are arriving at the C-Gates (Schengen)
You will arrive directly into the boarding area. If leaving from the C-Gates, the connection will take less than 5 minutes. If leaving from another departure area, head towards the upper level and the transfer corridor, and follow signs to your next departure area, B (5 mins), D & E (5 mins) or F (10-15 mins).

You are arriving at the D-Gates (Non-Schengen)
You should arrive on the upper level directly where you will clear passport control. If connecting, follow signs and turn left in order to clear transfer security. You will then enter the secure area and can then head for your next departure area, B (10 mins), C (5 mins), D & E (2-3 mins) or F (10-15 mins).

You are arriving at the E-Gates
More information is needed to confirm transfer process, but expect either to be channeled into gate area or on upper level where you can easily head back down to connect to D, E & F-Gates, or follow transfer corridor for B & C-Gates.

You are arriving at the F-Gates
More information is needed to confirm transfer process, expect to clear passport controls and head landside before reclearing security.

How to get to & from Orly?
Orly may be slightly less convenient to access by public transport, but is closer to Paris by car.

By Public Transport:

RER B + Orlyval:
This line, which links southern Paris and northern Paris, has several central stops in the city (Gare du Nord, Chatelet, Saint Michel, Denfert etc). Take the RER B to Antony, where you will then switch to the Orlyval, which stops in front of Orly 1 and Orly 4. The price for a Paris - Orly ticket + Orlyval is 12,1€. If you have a Navigo card, the RER B leg is included but you still need to buy a 2,80€ Orlyval ticket. Count 35-40 minutes from Chatelet to Orly. If transferring from Orly to CDG (or vice versa), count 75 minutes.

Metro 7 + Tramway 7:
This takes a bit more time from central Paris, but is convenient if you are directly on the Metro 7 line or are looking to get to Orly on the cheap. Take Metro 7 to Villejuif-Louis-Aragon and then change to Tramway 7 which goes all the way to Orly Airport.

Orlybus:
RATP bus line from Denfert-Rochereau to Orly. Ticket price: 8,70€ (Navigo zones 1-4 passes accepted), leaves every 10 to 15 minutes. 25 to 35 min travel time.

Le Bus Direct:
Le Bus Direct service is now permanently discontinued, victim Covid-19.

By Car:
Several car parks are available at Orly and can be pre-booked. Travel time can vary wildly from central Paris, from 30 mins to 45 mins in normal conditions, and more if congestion is very bad. Always check a map app (Google Maps, Waze) for traffic info beforehand. Most of the big rental companies have a presence at Orly 1/2 and Orly 4.

By Taxi/Uber/VTC:
A taxi stand is available in front of Orly 4 and Orly 1, and soon in front of Orly 3. Uber and the other ride-sharing companies offer service to and from Orly. Taxis can be pre-booked from differents providers such as G7.
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Old Jun 5, 19, 3:23 am
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Goldorak View Post

Yes it does but the confusion is not due to you but to ADP and we truly appreciate your efforts to try to make it easier for the non-frequent travellers in ORY ^
Thank you I am making a wikipost on top of the thread to put everything in one place, after all, this is the second AF Hub and there should be a place to find all the info for Orly as we have for CDG easily.
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Old Jun 5, 19, 2:15 pm
  #32  
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Originally Posted by joyu12 View Post
Thank you I am making a wikipost on top of the thread to put everything in one place, after all, this is the second AF Hub and there should be a place to find all the info for Orly as we have for CDG easily.
Very useful. Thank you ^
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Old Jun 5, 19, 3:51 pm
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At this point it seems that it is not possible to connect airside across areas, e.g. to go from the A gates to the D gates one has to go through security again. Even worse with E and F. Is there an expectation of seamless transfers eventually?
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Old Jun 5, 19, 11:17 pm
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Originally Posted by af fp View Post
At this point it seems that it is not possible to connect airside across areas, e.g. to go from the A gates to the D gates one has to go through security again. Even worse with E and F. Is there an expectation of seamless transfers eventually?
I think that ultimately it will be possible (I think I read that somewhere), but I let ORY experts confirm or not.
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Old Jun 6, 19, 4:13 am
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Originally Posted by af fp View Post
At this point it seems that it is not possible to connect airside across areas, e.g. to go from the A gates to the D gates one has to go through security again. Even worse with E and F. Is there an expectation of seamless transfers eventually?
Hi AF FP as Goldorak said indeed it will become possible eventually. From what i have heard from a credible AF Orly source is that B through F will be connected airside in the short term (I believe D, E & F are already connected airside, but i will confirm this when i go to Orly next time, i am mostly flying out of CDG atm), with A requiring an extension level to be built in order to make airside connections feasible (The transfer channel is on the level above the gates, which used to be the Orly Ouest arrivals channel, with the A-gates lacking that level it needs to be built). The D and E gates are the same from a connections perspective as its the same building and the connections channel would bring you to the E area before you can clear passport control into D.
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Old Jun 7, 19, 2:43 am
  #36  
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Flying from Orly this morning, and i can confirm that the transfer corridor linking Gates B, C, D, E & F is operational. Pax arriving at the E gates reclear security & passports airside in the Orly 3 transfer corridor before joining the common transfer corridor (not sure how it works for pax arriving at the F gates).

The C Bus gates (C24-27) have been converted into mixed-use gates as to add bus gates capacity for D-Gates.

Step by step Orly is becoming less of a mess of an airport (though there are many steps left )
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Old Jun 19, 19, 3:59 am
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Does anyone know if there is anywhere we could find out AF MCT times for Orly? it could come in handy for the wiki...
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Old Jun 19, 19, 4:34 am
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Those who receive the Abonnée newsletter may have noted that the Orly lounge situation was mentioned, one line captured my attention:

"et dans un salon éphémère à Orly 2, au niveau 0 de la salle d’embarquement, sous réserve de places disponibles."

Given that it looks like Orly 2 seems like it is being converted fully into a Schengen zone, this is kind of surprising... I'll ask around to see if i can get some more information
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Old Jun 19, 19, 11:04 am
  #39  
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Have done my first couple of trips at Orly.
Hard to believe how confusing the signage is within the airport.
Luckily I had carefully read all the details provided by my fellow FTers.
But I could see foreign pax completely flabbergasted.

At some points there were signs for "gates 11-14" and just below "Gates B, C, D" (I don't remember the exact numbers letters). No indication for Orly 2, 3 or 4.
Why not call the numbered gates A11-A14? Why no indications of Orly 2 rather than gates C?
I helped some Asian pax who had a transfer and could not understand how to use the signs.
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Old Jun 19, 19, 3:05 pm
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Originally Posted by brunos View Post
Have done my first couple of trips at Orly.
Hard to believe how confusing the signage is within the airport.
Luckily I had carefully read all the details provided by my fellow FTers.
But I could see foreign pax completely flabbergasted.

At some points there were signs for "gates 11-14" and just below "Gates B, C, D" (I don't remember the exact numbers letters). No indication for Orly 2, 3 or 4.
Why not call the numbered gates A11-A14? Why no indications of Orly 2 rather than gates C?
I helped some Asian pax who had a transfer and could not understand how to use the signs.
Why? I know you do know the answer. Because every planner of infrastructure or services in France worth its salt spends a lot of time in making things comlicated. By design. And when then some super smarts like us here on the board have figured it out, there is still room left for random anarchy ensured by poor execution: by signs actually saying the wrong thing because someone didn't pay attention when putting them up. Or by clueless staff who contradict what the website says which contradict what the signs say which contradict what another staff says. Or by strikes that nobody konws about.

Same things at CDG: what is the logic of having Terminal F with concourses F1 and F2, where you'd then expect gate numbers to start with F1x or F1xx and F2x and F2xx respectively - mais non. Gate numbers in F1 start with F2x, and gate numbers in F2 start with F4x I think.

By analogy to F1 and F2 you would then expect that 2E with three concourses would also just be concourses E1, E2, E2. But no. In 2E, concourses have letters. And those letters have nothing to do with E, but they are K, L, M. And to have laughs every day, the ADP guys made sure to mix contradicting with confusing information. For instance, when you get to 2G and want to transfer to 2E, there are places where there are signs to "Terminal 2E", other places where there are signs to "K, L, M" (without the word "gate" - adding to the confusion as some people might have ended up thinking that following these signs would lead to the place where KLM flights leave from).

But as mentioned earlier, whilst ADP and Air France struggle with too many bureaucratic farts with a messy minds, they are topped by SNCF. If you believe that Orly gate and terminal numbering don't make sense, come to Gare de Lyon. Every railway station in the civilized workd that I know (which does exclude quite many I guess, but still) has some logic sequence in its track numbering or labeling. Most use numbers, as letters are used for parts of the actual platform so that people can locate their carriage. When the layout of the station is a little complicated, they try to make track numbering easy. Example, Berlin Central station (and here we are talking about a city so disorganised they don't even know whether they should fix or re-build a messed-up airport project). Berlin Central Station has two levels, upper level is going East-West, lower level North-South. Lower level has lower numbers, platforms 1-8. Upper level has higher numbers 11-16.

Now take Paris Gare de Lyon: they have two halls, hall 1 and hall 2. Makes sense so far. But instead of having hall 1 with tracks 1-12 and hall 2 with tracks 20-29 there was a strike of genius: Hall 1 has tracks with letters, Hall 2 has tracks with numbers. And letters don't go A, B, C, D, E, etc. Non Monsieur, that would be too obvious. They go A, C, D, E, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N. Why there are gaps between some letters (A>C, missing B) but not others (D>E) is a bureaucrat's mystery. Hall 2 on the other hand at least is consistent in its lack of logic. They start at 9 - don't ask why not at 1, that's another bureaucrat's secret - and then go 11, 13, 15, and so on. But hey, this is still too obvious. So what they have done to really make things messy: when you stand in front of the trains in Hall 1, the lower platforms (A) are on the left, the higher (N) on the right. In Hall 2, it's the opposite.

Seriously, not even Kafka could have come up with that.

And I am sure they have 10 people at Gare de Lyon on a CDI (permanent job) playing Platform Scrabble. Sure, at least 2 are always sick on any given day (=not productive either), 2 are taking their RTT (=don't work), 1 is on permanent strike (=doesn't work), 1 is on a training course (=1 doesn't work), 1 is seconded to a project to SNCF headquarters to take part in the complexification of the fare structure (=no work either), and 2 are full time union representatives complaining about "un manque d'effectifs et une dégradation des conditions de travail". But that doesn't matter, because in any case those ten people would only be executing orders of the "Centre de vérification des instructions, cellule Paris-Sud Est", which employs 15 people just for platform numbering, who report into the Greater Paris control centre, which in turn takes its direction from a steering committee of 30 people from SNCF National HQ, the Ile de France region, the Ministry of Transportation, the Paris City Hall, the Association Française des Rivérains des Gares, and some trade unions. And because they cannot decide over a 7 year period, the decision is taken elsewhere, "arbitrage à Matignon", but only when it's more than 2 years before the next election.

Compared to that, Orly is paradise and ADP a lean, well-run company. It still should be privatized.
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Old Jun 19, 19, 4:12 pm
  #41  
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And to top the mess that is Gare de Lyon (and other Paris railway stations such as Montparnasse) they have a Hall 3 which serves no purpose except for confusing people even more about how to get to their train... Especially as its almost pitched as some kind of alternative boarding area for Hall 1, but sometimes you have to board from Hall 3 instead of Hall 1, and the escalators just leads up to the.... Hall 1 tracks....

A fellow family member who also flies frequently to/from Corsica and is a platinum member went to Orly recently and had to call me to understand where he was to check-in and then board from as the displays at the airport were as confusing as the signs in the public area themselves... You recall correctly brunos, the signs point to the check-in desks by their numbers (11, 22, 33 etc) and the boarding gates, but not the actual terminal areas (1, 2, 3, 4) and one is left to deduce that the check-in desks mimic the terminal area they have been assigned to...
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Old Sep 22, 19, 5:44 pm
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Originally Posted by joyu12 View Post
Does anyone know if there is anywhere we could find out AF MCT times for Orly? it could come in handy for the wiki...
I wanted to bump this - does anyone know the MCTs? I've got an AF to UX connection coming up and I'd be curious to know the MCT for it.
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Old Sep 22, 19, 11:48 pm
  #43  
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Originally Posted by glboisvert View Post
I wanted to bump this - does anyone know the MCTs? I've got an AF to UX connection coming up and I'd be curious to know the MCT for it.
I tried to find it but I can’t.
But, I always wonder why some people wants to know that information. If you have purchased a ticket or if you intend to and see a routing proposed, then the connection is of course legal. Airlines and OTA do not sell illegal connections.
I have the feeling you may travel on separate tickets, and so the concept of MCT is not applicable to this situation.

And f you want an answer to your question, you need to tell if your AF flight is Schengen or not, as the MCT will be different.
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Old Sep 23, 19, 7:44 am
  #44  
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Originally Posted by Goldorak View Post
But, I always wonder why some people wants to know that information. If you have purchased a ticket or if you intend to and see a routing proposed, then the connection is of course legal. Airlines and OTA do not sell illegal connections.
I have the feeling you may travel on separate tickets, and so the concept of MCT is not applicable to this situation.
Even if MCT is not technically applicable to a self-made connection, it can nonetheless be useful information: it tells you whether what the airline thinks is usually feasible in normal circumstances.

If there is an MCT of 20 mins, you know that the connection is likely to be a straightforward one so that planning on, say, 45 or 60 mins between flight has a reasonable likelihood to result in a satisfactory connection as long as the first flight is not substantially delayed. OTOH, if the MCT is 120 mins, then you would plan for a much longer delay between flights when planning a self-made connection.
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Old Sep 23, 19, 7:46 am
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Official AF-UK from Schengen to Schengen is 45 minutes.

But as Goldorak points out, that only works if you walk straight from one plane to the next, without having to stop at luggage pick-up or check-in counter for your connecting flight.

And of course, if booked on a separate ticket, connection isn't gauranteed.
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