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What are things you do when you travel that you are surprised others do not do?

What are things you do when you travel that you are surprised others do not do?

Old Apr 11, 18, 1:00 pm
  #76  
 
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Originally Posted by jspira View Post
To be fair, I don't take trips that are six to eight weeks long. For trips that are longer than 4-5 days, I typically send clean clothing ahead and enclose a prepaid shipping label to send items in need of laundering home. I've had trips where it's been JFK CDG CDG SEA SEA LHR LHR JFK so I sent the box to the FS in SEA.

Other options include hotel laundry, a laundromat, or elimination (i.e. old items ready to be discarded are replaced by new items purchased during the trip after one or two wearings).
That sounds like way more work than just checking a bag. And somewhat risky. What happens if you ship a box somewhere and then your travel plans change?
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Old Apr 11, 18, 1:04 pm
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Originally Posted by Zeeb View Post
That sounds like way more work than just checking a bag. And somewhat risky. What happens if you ship a box somewhere and then your travel plans change?
Not at all. Pack box, print label, drop it off at my building's concierge. The one time my plans changed, the concierge at the hotel I had sent the box to forwarded to my next stop.
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Old Apr 11, 18, 3:12 pm
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Originally Posted by txflyer77 View Post
I love the Red Oxx luggage tags for this. They're made of a thick rubber that's unlikely to ever come loose.
Another vote for Red Oxx tags. I actually put two on each bags (belt and suspenders).
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Old Apr 11, 18, 4:17 pm
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Originally Posted by thunderlounge View Post
Agreed. Go with the flow and adapt as necessary.





I like to keep one on my phone, but also have a paper backup. Either from a printout, or from an agent.




Same here. I'd rather spend an extra hour or two and play it safe, than to risk a miss and waste much more time. Even on the odd chance you make it most of the time, still not worth it to me either.





This for sure.




Definitely. I grabbed a belt that's got a carbon fiber buckle and no metal at all. Use it all the time, and never have to take it off.





Stand right, walk left.
Definitely this.
it's stand left walk right in my neck f the woods.
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Old Apr 11, 18, 5:15 pm
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Next week will be my first time going thru precheck and I have researched it. I purchased this primarily because I have a disablility and felt bad taking moretime. What kind of things are are you referring to when you say people are unprepared?
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Old Apr 11, 18, 5:24 pm
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ZEEB, I also mail some clothes when I travel domestically. It’s really great not to have stuff to carry. I am thinking of doing this for my trip to London. Have you done this from London? Any estimate of cost? I know it varies. I am in NC.
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Old Apr 11, 18, 6:49 pm
  #82  
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Originally Posted by Astaroth View Post
Not sure which airline or airports you are using... certainly there is no issue with getting one printed, and some have self service machines to do so, but flying budget shorthaul in many european airports will not be an essentially no line experience if you need to get a reprint
Thanks for your input. Should I find myself traveling on a discount Euro airline, I'll adjust my behavior accordingly.
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Old Apr 11, 18, 8:06 pm
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Originally Posted by Annalisa12 View Post
it's stand left walk right in my neck f the woods.
That's something I wonder about when I travel overseas. "Stand right, walk left" makes sense in the US because it's the same as our driving etiquette-- slower traffic keep right, pass to the left. Obviously in countries where driving is done on the left rather than right side of the road, driving etiquette is the reverse. But is walking etiquette also reversed? My experience in some driving-on-the-left countries has been that pedestrians still use stand-right etiquette.
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Old Apr 12, 18, 10:49 pm
  #84  
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Originally Posted by darthbimmer View Post
That's something I wonder about when I travel overseas. "Stand right, walk left" makes sense in the US because it's the same as our driving etiquette-- slower traffic keep right, pass to the left. Obviously in countries where driving is done on the left rather than right side of the road, driving etiquette is the reverse. But is walking etiquette also reversed? My experience in some driving-on-the-left countries has been that pedestrians still use stand-right etiquette.
Japan: I almost hit an airport door that didn't open for me--I was following the normal keep right logic without even thinking about it. Apparently they intended one door for in and one for out and they only had sensors in one direction. (And I didn't even remember Japanese driving direction--I had no intention of driving so it wasn't something I had any reason to look up.)
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Old Apr 13, 18, 1:06 am
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Originally Posted by Loren Pechtel View Post
Japan: I almost hit an airport door that didn't open for me--I was following the normal keep right logic without even thinking about it. Apparently they intended one door for in and one for out and they only had sensors in one direction. (And I didn't even remember Japanese driving direction--I had no intention of driving so it wasn't something I had any reason to look up.)
Japan is perhaps an unusual case. In Tokyo, folk stand on the left side of the escalator. However in Osaka, normal practice is to stand on the right !
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Old Apr 13, 18, 5:59 am
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Originally Posted by jspira View Post
Not at all. Pack box, print label, drop it off at my building's concierge. The one time my plans changed, the concierge at the hotel I had sent the box to forwarded to my next stop.
I don't get why you think it is easier doing that than checking a bag?
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Old Apr 13, 18, 8:28 am
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Originally Posted by Annalisa12 View Post
I don't get why you think it is easier doing that than checking a bag?
For me, this is so much easier because I have problems carrying a bag due to effects of polio. This frees me up quite a lot.
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Old Apr 13, 18, 10:21 am
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(1) For int'l travel I always print out itinerary / confirmation emails and save paper boarding passes. Many times during exit immigration this has been helpful, esp when there is no entrance stamp in my passport or it is illegible. And can be useful during entrance immigration if they want proof of onward travel.

For domestic travel I never print itineraries and use either phone or paper BP depending on which is more convenient.

(2) I always bring small pieces of paper (index cards, or a small notebook with removable pages). Great for writing addresses to hand to taxi drivers when there's a language barrier, leaving notes at hotel desks for family members, jotting down train times, etc., etc.

(3) I always bring a portable battery pack charger for my phone (duh...never though to do it until I got one and now can't leave home without it). Usually don't have to use it but always helpful during those long delays or when the charger falls out of your phone and you don't notice till you wake up and your phone is at 10% battery and you have to rush off to the airport. Mine doubles as a flashlight too which I've used many times to find things in my bag, look under the bed, etc. I guess most road warriors carry one at this point but I find many of my friends don't.

(4) Along those lines, I often carry a three-to-one power outlet splitter like this:


Costs $6. When travelling int'l I only have to carry one power adapter and can plug in 3 devices. When travelling anywhere with US-compatible plugs it solves the problem of when you are at the gate and there's only one outlet and it's already been claimed -- no one minds unplugging their laptop for 2s to let you plug this in and then more people can share.

(5) I guess I'm obsessed with power...but a long time ago I bought a phone charger and laptop charger with Euro plugs and I take them when I go (and leave behind my US ones). Way easier just to plug/unplug native chargers than carry flaky power adapters everywhere.

(6) I always always always carry a Clif Bar or some other kind of granola bar. Never know when your plane will sit on the tarmac for hours, or you'll arrive in a new city late and everything is closed. Travel delays are bad enough but if you are hangry they are worse. Even just knowing I could eat if I needed to makes things easier. If it's someplace with a warm climate or in summer I always carry 500ml of water too.

(7) I carry a small ziplock of tea bags of my preferred brand. Small, light, and cheap, and means I can have my morning beverage wherever I am. Hot water is widely available but good tea often is not, and I don't drink coffee. (Totally happy to have the local tea if it's good though!)

(8) Ok now a weird thing...when packing I usually just take shirts, pants, etc. on their hangers and fold them loosely into my suitcase in one big bundle. I don't take them off the hangers or fold them individually. When I arrive on the other end I just open my suitcase and everything is ready to hang up super easily. I find things don't get any more wrinkled than they do when folding individually, and I'm more likely to hang things up quickly upon my arrival (and I don't have to go hunting for hangers, etc.). Things too dirty to be worn again go in the suitcase off-hanger (but I keep the hanger around), so every place I stop I just re-create a mini version of my closet at home basically.

I even do this while (non-backpacking) camping, I just hang up my clean clothes on a tree or on my hammock rope.
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Old Apr 13, 18, 10:38 am
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(4) Along those lines, I often carry a three-to-one power outlet splitter like this:


I am totally stealing this idea.
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Old Apr 13, 18, 8:56 pm
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Originally Posted by mdkowals View Post
(4) Along those lines, I often carry a three-to-one power outlet splitter like this:

I am totally stealing this idea.
I've had a three-way splitter like that for a few years. It's great not just when traveling overseas but also anywhere domestically with too few outlets-- like certain older hotels, and of course, airports. It's great to walk up to a socket in the airport waiting area that's dense with people camped around it and say, "Hi, how about we share!"
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