FA Drinking while deadheading

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Old Apr 1, 19, 8:41 am
  #31  
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Originally Posted by PurdueFlyer View Post
First post of the thread, per the OP, states she was NOT in uniform.

Also, wasn't this thread locked a day ago, and is now mysteriously un-locked again?
I was the forum moderator who locked it, and then unlocked it with further info. If discussion can maintain civility (and be consistent with other FT posting rules - link below) I'm happy to let it proceed.

https://www.flyertalk.com/help/rules.php#threadtitles

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Old Apr 1, 19, 8:52 am
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Originally Posted by PurdueFlyer View Post
First post of the thread, per the OP, states she was NOT in uniform.

Also, wasn't this thread locked a day ago, and is now mysteriously un-locked again?
Just adding general information but back to what I was saying is that her ticket type prohibits her from drinking.
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Old Apr 1, 19, 10:41 am
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Ahem... cough...cough... latecomer here so please be patient.
Did OP actually see this FA drinking? For all I know they asked for 2 bottles of liquor during pre departure service.
They may very well have bagged it for drinking at the destination.
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Old Apr 1, 19, 11:07 am
  #34  
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Originally Posted by PurdueFlyer View Post
First post of the thread, per the OP, states she was NOT in uniform.

Also, wasn't this thread locked a day ago, and is now mysteriously un-locked again?
The fact that she requested the jumpseat means that she cannot drink, whether in uniform or not. She's officially "non-operating crew."
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Old Apr 1, 19, 11:35 am
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
The fact that she requested the jumpseat means that she cannot drink, whether in uniform or not. She's officially "non-operating crew."
Since they were occupying passenger seats can't they do whatever they want to do (within reason)? They probably requested jumpseats because that isn't as dependent on seats being empty.
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Old Apr 1, 19, 11:53 am
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Just a curious question. If you are a airline employee and not working and wearing "street clothes" Why do you wear your work lanyard? It doesn't get you a better seat, it might get you a free drink but other than that why wear it? Is it a "Look at me I work for X airline"? The last thing I would want people to know is that i'm an employee. No need to answer questions, remarks about how I got this eat, etc.
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Old Apr 1, 19, 12:54 pm
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Originally Posted by MrHockey View Post
Just a curious question. If you are a airline employee and not working and wearing "street clothes" Why do you wear your work lanyard? It doesn't get you a better seat, it might get you a free drink but other than that why wear it? Is it a "Look at me I work for X airline"? The last thing I would want people to know is that i'm an employee. No need to answer questions, remarks about how I got this eat, etc.
You’re spot on. They’re hoping for favors from fellow employees and/or attention from passengers. While some airlines actually have a rule that requires wearing employee ID, most have a rule prohibiting it. Blending into the crowd is a key element of nonrev travel.
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Old Apr 1, 19, 1:14 pm
  #38  
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
The fact that she requested the jumpseat means that she cannot drink, whether in uniform or not. She's officially "non-operating crew."
Well, another employee reached out to me via PM - and cited the ops manual! It seems pilots and FAs have different rules in this situation:

"F/As NOT riding in the jumpseat are treated differently than a pilot NOT riding in the jumpseat, provided they are still not wearing a uniform and don't return to the jumpseat. They would be elegible to come alcohol." Absent being a deadhead leg, of course.

FA in the jump seat = no alcohol

FA not in the jump seat (nor returning to jump seat) and not in uniform = OK to consume. Just listing for the jump seat isn't, itself, disqualifying.

So, going back to the original post: Not in uniform and Not in jump seat = no violation.
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Old Apr 1, 19, 1:16 pm
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.....and pilots having different rules would explain the conversation the OP overheard.
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Old Apr 1, 19, 8:10 pm
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Originally Posted by jackvogt View Post
Since they were occupying passenger seats can't they do whatever they want to do (within reason)? They probably requested jumpseats because that isn't as dependent on seats being empty.
So most airlines work on "flow back" and while she may have sat in a passenger seat that's not how she's listed on the manifest. She would be listed as a non-operating crew member. Which is a no-go for consuming drinks.
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Old Apr 1, 19, 8:17 pm
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Originally Posted by seatacpilot View Post
So most airlines work on "flow back" and while she may have sat in a passenger seat that's not how she's listed on the manifest. She would be listed as a non-operating crew member. Which is a no-go for consuming drinks.
3Cforme’s comment above says that isn’t the case for Delta FAs flying on Delta metal. In any case, the GA could’ve easily changed that FA’s listing from JSA to NRSA and assigning the occupied seat before closing out the flight.
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Old Apr 1, 19, 10:51 pm
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Well ... as an AA GA from long ago, I can say what their rules were back then ...

There was no such thing as "list for the jumpseat". FAs and Pilots, when flying non-rev (IE: personal travel vs "deadhead" which is company travel) are allowed to ride in (their respective type of) jumpseat ONLY if all cabin seats are full. They "list" for the fact that they desire non-rev/standby travel on the flight, but they do NOT "list" specifically for a jumpseat. If memory serves me right, if assigned a jumseat then non-rev service charges were waived ... thus they could not request jumpseat to avoid charges, they would be assigned jumpseat if it was the only option.
They do not need to be in uniform to ride jumpseat. Vacationing Pilots & FAs are (practically) never in uniform. Commuters (again: different from deadheaders) very often are.
I have had crew members graciously, when they were next on the standby list, offer to ride jumpseat to allow another (lower on the list) non-crew employee to have a cabin seat.

If you're in uniform, you may not drink alcohol no matter where you are seated. To passengers, you look like an employee, possibly headed towards duty.
If you're assigned a jumpseat, you may not drink alcohol no matter what you're wearing. You're sitting in an official crewed position; it makes no difference how you "appear" to passengers, you may not drink.
If you're seated in the cabin and are not in uniform, then not only do you appear to be just another passenger, you actually are one. Enjoy your flight, keeping in mind that if your selected beverage/meal/etc is running short, you'll be the 1st to be asked to switch.

As a Gate AAgent on 2nd shift, at 11pm after 8 hours on duty, we were all ready for a drink at our favorite watering hole (and trust me ... said spot was definitely off airport property)
Very few of us carried a change of clothes. But we had to remove anything with the name/logo. For us guys, obviously the badge, name tag and ties were off ... but also the belt because the buckle was AA's stylized Eagle. ALL types of logo had to be off.

As for the ID badge still being worn ....
I think 9-11 changed the philosophy on this. My post 9-11 days at AA were all behind the scene HDQ type jobs, so this is just my theory.
In my days at the airport (pre 9-11) my ID was just a card I carried in my wallet. It was my uniform and door keys that gave me access to everyplace I needed to be.
9-11 changed all that. Uniforms no longer proved anything. A key that could open any AA door (at my access level) system wide was worthless. The new TSA decided employees had to go thru screening.
ID's were needed so much/often that they came out of the wallet and onto a lanyard. I think that out of habit, employees today simply keep that lanyard handy at all times they're doing anything airport/airline related.
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Old Apr 2, 19, 10:57 am
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Deadheading is also having them to return to base even if getting off work. My daughter is an FA and sometimes they can get crew scheduling to change their Deadhead location if they are going "off work" as soon as they land.
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Old Apr 2, 19, 11:19 am
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Originally Posted by 3Cforme View Post
Well, another employee reached out to me via PM - and cited the ops manual! It seems pilots and FAs have different rules in this situation:

"F/As NOT riding in the jumpseat are treated differently than a pilot NOT riding in the jumpseat, provided they are still not wearing a uniform and don't return to the jumpseat. They would be elegible to come alcohol." Absent being a deadhead leg, of course.

FA in the jump seat = no alcohol

FA not in the jump seat (nor returning to jump seat) and not in uniform = OK to consume. Just listing for the jump seat isn't, itself, disqualifying.

So, going back to the original post: Not in uniform and Not in jump seat = no violation.
This is correct. Jumpseating is not deadheading and a deadhead boarding pass would not display “FA Jumpseat” on it. FAs who move to a passenger seat with no intention of moving back are allowed to consume alcohol.

Additionally - to answer the question of why the FA was wearing their ID. When jumpseating, at DL, Company ID has to be displayed when not in uniform. Once offered a passenger seat it can be put it away.
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Old Apr 2, 19, 11:24 am
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Originally Posted by Widgets View Post

3Cforme’s comment above says that isn’t the case for Delta FAs flying on Delta metal. In any case, the GA could’ve easily changed that FA’s listing from JSA to NRSA and assigning the occupied seat before closing out the flight.
This almost never happens. On occasion when checking in well before the flight boards a gate agent may switch it over and assign a seat if they know there will be plenty of seats. Most often the JS moves to an empty seat once the door is closed and is still listed in the paperwork as a JS. This is still allowed. In either scenario they’re still allowed to consume alcohol either way. The process to switch a JS to NRSA has always been a several minute ordeal, in my experience, which is time the gate agent doesn’t have when trying to close out the flight.
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