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Recovery from Covid Letter/Certificate [merged thread]

Recovery from Covid Letter/Certificate [merged thread]

 
Old Aug 9, 2021, 5:11 am
  #1  
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Recovery from Covid Letter/Certificate [merged thread]

Hi all, I've tried finding an answer to this but cannot seem to get anything concrete on an answer so hoping if somebody has experience with this, they could share.

Flying to USA this week from UK (US Citizen) and unlike previous trips, I've since had Covid and have proof I had Covid through the NHS pass. Would this be sufficient to provide instead of the Covid test? The CDC guidance is either an official test or document of recovery but I can find very little online about people's experiences of using a document of recovery and furthermore whether the NHS pass outlining my previous positive test back in early July would be sufficient?

Thanks for any guidance
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Old Aug 9, 2021, 7:28 am
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If you are a US citizen, the border patrol can't really restrict your entry. This is being done by the airlines/airports. But I don't think a proof of covid pass would work. People who have been vaccinated still need to show a negative PCR or antigen test upon arrival. I've made several international trips as a US citizen over the past few months, and I don't recall seeing any waivers. You might consider printing out the CDC guidance. But then its up to the whim of an airport official, who could simply deny you.

Sounds much easier to just get the Antigen/PCR test before you leave the UK.
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Old Aug 9, 2021, 9:17 am
  #3  
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Just take a quick and cheap antigen test. It's far easier to show a piece of paper showing negative status.

There are lots of countries that reference "recovery from COVID" documents, but I have never seen one. Because unless you are a professional athlete or in some other profession that tests frequently, you simply don't have a positive test followed by several negative tests to show. All you have is a positive test from awhile back and the assumption you recovered within 14 days or so...
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Old Aug 9, 2021, 12:24 pm
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Originally Posted by Brisbane Road
Hi all, I've tried finding an answer to this but cannot seem to get anything concrete on an answer so hoping if somebody has experience with this, they could share.

Flying to USA this week from UK (US Citizen) and unlike previous trips, I've since had Covid and have proof I had Covid through the NHS pass. Would this be sufficient to provide instead of the Covid test? The CDC guidance is either an official test or document of recovery but I can find very little online about people's experiences of using a document of recovery and furthermore whether the NHS pass outlining my previous positive test back in early July would be sufficient?

Thanks for any guidance
Here's what the CDC says is required for documentation...sounds like a letter from your doctor plus your NHS test results would suffice...

What kind of documentation of my test result or documentation of recovery do I need to present?
...
If you are traveling with documentation of recovery, you must present paper or electronic copies of your positive test result (dated no more than 90 days ago) and a signed letter, on official letterhead that contains the name, address, and phone number of a licensed healthcare provider or public health official, stating that you have been cleared to end isolation and therefore can travel. A letter that states that you have been cleared to end isolation to return to work or school is also acceptable. The letter does not have to specifically mention travel.
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...travelers.html
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Old Aug 9, 2021, 12:39 pm
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I would suggest to go for a rapid antigen test and count on a negative test report for use to travel to the US.

The Covid-19 documents are checked by the airline outside of the US. Of all my trips to the US during this year, CBP hasnt asked me anything about Covid-19 docs. And of the others in my social circle, none have had CBP ask them for COVID-19 docs in the US.
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Old Aug 9, 2021, 1:45 pm
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I have done this with my US citizen children on an SAS flight from CPH-IAD. It worked fine. They had documentation of a positive PCR test from a laboratory, signed by a doctor. Additionally, they had a letter from a doctor stating they had recovered from covid-19. I don't know how it would work with other airlines, though. But SAS knew the rules and approved us without much hassle. Thing is, it's very difficult for the US to refuse entry to a US citizen and the airlines (generally) know that. So if you have all the paperwork, you shouldn't have any issue. But I should point out again, the test result is not enough. You also need that letter of recovery from a doctor.
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Old Aug 9, 2021, 5:46 pm
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My understanding is that people who have had COVID-19 and recovered can continue to test positive for some time, up to several months. For them, the proof of having had COVID-19 and recovered might be the only realistic way to obtain documents needed for travel. In fact, in such cases, if they get a recent positive test, this alone could cause trouble as at least some airlines ask you whether you've had a positive test result during the last ten to fourteen days before you can check in.
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Old Aug 9, 2021, 6:03 pm
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist
My understanding is that people who have had COVID-19 and recovered can continue to test positive for some time, up to several months. For them, the proof of having had COVID-19 and recovered might be the only realistic way to obtain documents needed for travel. In fact, in such cases, if they get a recent positive test, this alone could cause trouble as at least some airlines ask you whether you've had a positive test result during the last ten to fourteen days before you can check in.
i agree. before i even fly abroad, i would ask to get a letter from my doctor documenting my recovery from covid, wouldnt want to bet on finding an MD in a foreign country and explaining this whole letter of recovery process...
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Old Aug 11, 2021, 3:28 am
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I have always had great respect for doctors; after all what does our body need more than anything else? Doctors are there to help us with whatever we might need: from mental health issues, to physical injuries or just constant checkups. They also specialize in international healthcare so if you're going overseas don't forget about them before getting any further!
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Old Aug 11, 2021, 11:28 am
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Originally Posted by RentmyRide
I have always had great respect for doctors; after all what does our body need more than anything else? Doctors are there to help us with whatever we might need: from mental health issues, to physical injuries or just constant checkups. They also specialize in international healthcare so if you're going overseas don't forget about them before getting any further!
Only a few doctors specialize in international healthcare. They're likely to be associated with a travel medicine clinic. Your normal family physician knows less about international healthcare than many people who post here.
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Old Aug 26, 2021, 10:20 am
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So am I right in thinking that if you intend to travel back to the US, using "Documents of recovery" due to positive Covid infection in the past 3 months that you shouldn't even try and take a pre-flight Covid test before arriving at the airport to fly?

Thanks for any replies
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Old Aug 26, 2021, 11:12 am
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I think the conventional wisdom is you should still do an anti-gen test in case you run into a gate agent that isn't aware of the "document of recovery". If the anti-gen test is negative, just show that to avoid the hassle of having to possibly explain you HAD covid, but have recovered. Plus the anti-gen test isn't expensive, $40 here in Canada, other countries may be cheaper or free, no harm in doing the test.
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Old Aug 26, 2021, 11:40 am
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Originally Posted by supervillian
I think the conventional wisdom is you should still do an anti-gen test in case you run into a gate agent that isn't aware of the "document of recovery". If the anti-gen test is negative, just show that to avoid the hassle of having to possibly explain you HAD covid, but have recovered. Plus the anti-gen test isn't expensive, $40 here in Canada, other countries may be cheaper or free, no harm in doing the test.
Thank you supervillan for your reply.

I would agree that a negative test result would be alot easier for departure, but what if the test comes back positive?

Can you disregard it and continue on with the " Document of recovery" process?
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Old Aug 26, 2021, 5:06 pm
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Originally Posted by supervillian
I think the conventional wisdom is you should still do an anti-gen test in case you run into a gate agent that isn't aware of the "document of recovery". If the anti-gen test is negative, just show that to avoid the hassle of having to possibly explain you HAD covid, but have recovered. Plus the anti-gen test isn't expensive, $40 here in Canada, other countries may be cheaper or free, no harm in doing the test.
I would disagree, depending on the airline you're flying. Before you can check in with DL (apparently for any flight, including domestic), you're asked whether you've had a positive COVID-19 test within the last ten days. I suspect that if you answer yes, you won't be allowed to board or even to continue with check in.
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Old Aug 26, 2021, 7:40 pm
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist
I would disagree, depending on the airline you're flying. Before you can check in with DL (apparently for any flight, including domestic), you're asked whether you've had a positive COVID-19 test within the last ten days. I suspect that if you answer yes, you won't be allowed to board or even to continue with check in.
Thank you MSPeconomist for your reply.

I'm concerned that this issue is where things get unclear regarding flying back to the US under the Documents of Recovery Program.

I have not seen mention anywhere either on the CDC website regarding this type of travel or on the Dept. of Homeland security site regarding this type of travel saying " you should not attempt to take a fit to fly test if using the documented recovery program."

Maybe the fact is doesn't mention getting a test with this method is enough but I wish it did spell out the do's and don'ts for it.

I totally get it that every checkin staff member is going to be expecting that " negative test" result and anything else is just going to cause all kinds of who-hah.

Its quite disconcerting knowing, in the back of your mind that at the end of your trip, you might be faced with a situation that goes sideways really quickly when you are trying to go home.

Am I over reacting to this?
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