Wider impact of Covid-19 on Air NZ

Old Mar 3, 2020, 7:59 pm
  #61  
 
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Originally Posted by nzkarit
The research shows is only the row person and two Infront and three behind (or something along those lines).
So even if on a plane with someone with Covid-19 the risk is low. ~20% of seats on a A320 would be at risk of there was a person on the plane who was infectious. Then factor in ~99% of flights don't have a contagious person. The probability is low.
Absolutely, but I think in the current climate it is best to avoid unnecessary travel if not needed, you never know what will happen. The people in the 2 rows in front and behind the person on the flight to and from Palmerston North probably thought the same thing, but now they have to undergo 2 weeks of anxiety which is rather sad.
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Old Mar 3, 2020, 8:29 pm
  #62  
 
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Originally Posted by curioustill
Absolutely, but I think in the current climate it is best to avoid unnecessary travel if not needed, you never know what will happen. The people in the 2 rows in front and behind the person on the flight to and from Palmerston North probably thought the same thing, but now they have to undergo 2 weeks of anxiety which is rather sad.
I really don't think it is going to be possible to avoid people while this virus is an issue - train, taxis, bus, elevator, theater, shopping mall, supermarket, Round the Bays - all of which I am doing this week. We have no idea who we should be avoiding. It is likely the second person conformed was out and about in other settings as well - not just taking planes.
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Old Mar 3, 2020, 8:34 pm
  #63  
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I have a feeling given the domestic travel of this patient that more companies will tighten their travel policies to even restrict domestic to essential only...whether that is justified or not
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Old Mar 3, 2020, 10:00 pm
  #64  
 
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I have a pretty flexible business. I have been thinking about what I will and won't do, travel wise. I have decided to keep traveling but to plan around getting sick overseas. I won't die, but it might mean I can't get on a plane to go to my next destination. So I am being very careful with how I plan my travel, so that if I do have to miss a plane ride, its not the end of the world.

So for example, I had a trip that was going to have a week of leisure in NYC and then a week of business in LA. I am looking to switch it around now: that way, I can make my LA trip and if I get sick in LA and have to skip the NYC portion, its not the end of the world.

The other thing I'll be doing is going into self isolation around 1-2 prior to any international trip, to minimise the chances I'll get sick. Because if I get sick, then no flight!

I am also going to fly business class exclusively and sit near the front of the planes. It is probably only a minimal advantage, but if it's 2-3 rows either side in economy that are the "danger zone" then sitting in the front without anyone on that side just helps minimise your virus footprint at the very least.
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Old Mar 4, 2020, 1:29 am
  #65  
 
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Originally Posted by kiwifrequentflyer
I have a pretty flexible business. I have been thinking about what I will and won't do, travel wise. I have decided to keep traveling but to plan around getting sick overseas. I won't die, but it might mean I can't get on a plane to go to my next destination. So I am being very careful with how I plan my travel, so that if I do have to miss a plane ride, its not the end of the world.

So for example, I had a trip that was going to have a week of leisure in NYC and then a week of business in LA. I am looking to switch it around now: that way, I can make my LA trip and if I get sick in LA and have to skip the NYC portion, its not the end of the world.

The other thing I'll be doing is going into self isolation around 1-2 prior to any international trip, to minimise the chances I'll get sick. Because if I get sick, then no flight!

I am also going to fly business class exclusively and sit near the front of the planes. It is probably only a minimal advantage, but if it's 2-3 rows either side in economy that are the "danger zone" then sitting in the front without anyone on that side just helps minimise your virus footprint at the very least.
I like that strategy!

At the moment our workplace only allows for essential travel to China and Iran with CEO approval and travel to Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Korea, Singapore and Thailand requires approval at a lower level. All other travel remains unrestricted (including Palmerston North! were our organisations is headquartered).

Up until yesterday insurance policies issues for our travel covered claims related to coronavirus - but this has now been removed. I suspect this might flow though to where we can travel.
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Old Mar 4, 2020, 1:54 am
  #66  
 
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Originally Posted by jeffrocowboy
I really don't think it is going to be possible to avoid people while this virus is an issue - train, taxis, bus, elevator, theater, shopping mall, supermarket, Round the Bays - all of which I am doing this week. We have no idea who we should be avoiding. It is likely the second person conformed was out and about in other settings as well - not just taking planes.
You're absolutely right, it's just that for my trips I decided that they weren't absolutely necessary so I cancelled them. Trains, taxis, buses, etc as you have described are full of people, and it will be hard to flat out avoid everyone.
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Old Mar 4, 2020, 4:34 pm
  #67  
 
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Originally Posted by nomiiiii
Starting yesterday, flights from Auckland to Samoa have an added restriction of showing a medical clearance certificate before being given a boarding pass. The medical certificate must have been issued within 3 days before the flight.

Obviously this is a huge burden for travellers and I'm sure many people will be caught offguard by this requirement, or simply would not have been able to get a doctors appointment and have all the tests done to get a medical certificate on such short notice.

In light of this, is Air Newzealand actually enforcing this rule for their flights to Samoa and denying boarding to tons of people? Or is everyone actually able to get a medical certificate issued within the last 3 days? Or is Air Newzealand being lax about checking the medical certificate

I'd love to hear first-hand reports on the impact of this new restriction of medical certificate and its enforcement since I'm planning on travelling to Samoa soon and this whole medical requirement seems like a nightmare to get logistically (not to mention, going to a hospital risks exposure to viruses and tying up medical resources just to get a certificate seems ill-advised)
I’d count on it being enforced otherwise you’re gambling with your plans. Remember all those Samoan kids that died very recently because someone from NZ took their measles there? The “burden” of obtaining a certificate pales in comparison. If you’re well, why would you need a test? There are clinics you can just show up. Previously I’ve googled, called around for pricing (there is some variation and well worth the travel time even in Auckland). Only needed my ear syringed but it was a weekend and I was flying out.

Overall it wouldn’t surprise me if this virus travels there too at the end of the day but I wouldn’t want to be THAT person responsible for it especially if it potentially lead to deaths.

Check your travel insurance policy too.
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Old Mar 4, 2020, 5:03 pm
  #68  
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Originally Posted by NZbutterfly
I’d count on it being enforced otherwise you’re gambling with your plans. Remember all those Samoan kids that died very recently because someone from NZ took their measles there? The “burden” of obtaining a certificate pales in comparison. If you’re well, why would you need a test? There are clinics you can just show up. Previously I’ve googled, called around for pricing (there is some variation and well worth the travel time even in Auckland). Only needed my ear syringed but it was a weekend and I was flying out.

Overall it wouldn’t surprise me if this virus travels there too at the end of the day but I wouldn’t want to be THAT person responsible for it especially if it potentially lead to deaths.

Check your travel insurance policy too.
The problem is that the medical certificate isnt worth the paper its written on because it now seems pretty clear that many carriers are asymptomatic, or have very light symptoms (which either never develop further or only develop to fever etc later). Add to this the testing protocols set the bar to be tested very high there are presumably quite a few carriers in NZ unaware that would not be caught by a clinician.
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Old Mar 4, 2020, 5:38 pm
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Originally Posted by oranjemakker
The problem is that the medical certificate isnt worth the paper its written on because it now seems pretty clear that many carriers are asymptomatic, or have very light symptoms (which either never develop further or only develop to fever etc later). Add to this the testing protocols set the bar to be tested very high there are presumably quite a few carriers in NZ unaware that would not be caught by a clinician.
But then again, WHO pointed out that asymptomatic carriers rarely infect anyone outside of their very close family, because this spreads through droplets. If you aren't coughing or sneezing then you aren't spreading the droplets. Obviously you can still touch something and infect others, but the main way this is spreading outside of close contact is through symptomatic people, that's the majority.
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Old Mar 4, 2020, 5:52 pm
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My organisation has basically banned travel to any country where there is "community spread" even if only a handful of people are infected. So that rules out a lot of places (including most East Asian countries, USA, most of Europe). And domestic travel is being discouraged for non-essential reasons.

If this drags on for much longer a lot of Elites/Golds will lose their status, unless Air NZ steps in with some sort of support mechanism. Guess that might solve the lounge issue....
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Old Mar 4, 2020, 6:30 pm
  #71  
 
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Originally Posted by oranjemakker
The problem is that the medical certificate isnt worth the paper its written on because it now seems pretty clear that many carriers are asymptomatic, or have very light symptoms (which either never develop further or only develop to fever etc later). Add to this the testing protocols set the bar to be tested very high there are presumably quite a few carriers in NZ unaware that would not be caught by a clinician.
I don’t think the airline would have made this decision without medical advisors who would be aware of the limitations. As a passenger, arguing at check-in is probably pointless. So if people want a hassle free trip I’d just follow the rules.

In some ways I also think this shifts some blame away from Air NZ if/when Coronavirus reaches Samoa and other islands. “They had a medical certificate”.
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Old Mar 4, 2020, 6:39 pm
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If it is anything like visa rules, the airline may be on the hook to fly the person back & be fined for boarding someone who is not eligible to land.
So the airline isn't going to let it slide.
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Old Mar 4, 2020, 7:01 pm
  #73  
 
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Originally Posted by NZbutterfly
I don’t think the airline would have made this decision without medical advisors who would be aware of the limitations. As a passenger, arguing at check-in is probably pointless. So if people want a hassle free trip I’d just follow the rules.

In some ways I also think this shifts some blame away from Air NZ if/when Coronavirus reaches Samoa and other islands. “They had a medical certificate”.
The airlines didn't make the rule. Samoa did.
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Old Mar 4, 2020, 7:39 pm
  #74  
 
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I know of one fairly large organisation which has decreed that their staff must not come into contact with anyone from any country that has reported a Covid-19 infection unless they have been asymptomatic for 14 days.

So they're banned from meeting with anyone who has been in Australia for the last two weeks.

But the staff are still free to meet with anyone in New Zealand.

And the business of these muppets is risk!

If a newspaper published a headline every time someone stepped off a flight and had the flu or a bad cold, front page writers would be out of a job.
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Old Mar 4, 2020, 9:40 pm
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Originally Posted by stick1
My organisation has basically banned travel to any country where there is "community spread" even if only a handful of people are infected. So that rules out a lot of places (including most East Asian countries, USA, most of Europe). And domestic travel is being discouraged for non-essential reasons.

If this drags on for much longer a lot of Elites/Golds will lose their status, unless Air NZ steps in with some sort of support mechanism. Guess that might solve the lounge issue....
This - the lounge issue is secondary, I know - but then the primary issue is the former
All of my plans so far have been cancelled so it would be interesting for many of us here.
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