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Old Mar 28, 12, 2:20 pm   #1
 
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Question Is Newark a suburb of New York City? Or is Newark a city with its own identity?

Hey everyone. I currently live in North Texas. However, I have friends who live in and around the greater New York City metropolitan area. I understand that much of North Jersey, the Hudson River Valley, southwestern Connecticut, and Long Island consist of areas that are considered suburbs of NYC.

Now Newark is the biggest city in New Jersey. It has its own downtown area, financial core, and high-rise skyscrapers.

Is Newark still a suburb of NYC?

Or is Newark a city that has its own individual identity?

Tri-State area residents will sometimes tell outsiders that the Meadowlands Sports Complex is located "in the shadow of NYC". They also say the same about Uniondale on Long Island.

So physically and geographically speaking- Is Newark also situated "in the shadow of NYC"?

Or is Newark the Fort Worth to NYC's Dallas?
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Old Mar 28, 12, 2:37 pm   #2
 
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Think the Ft. Worth to Dallas analogy.

Newark has its own downtown, Performing Arts Center, hotels, universities, Prudential stadium and business district but majority of business and rush hour commute is centered around Manhattan.

Or if you are going out for nightlife:
Newark resident can visit Ironbound, Newark (many restaurants/bars) or take approx. 20 minute train ride into Manhattan.
Manhattan/NYC resident would rarely visit Newark for nightlife except for show (PAC or Prudential Center), airport, education or shopping at nearby factory outlet or IKEA.

Other NJ locations with similar profile - Jersey City, or Hoboken. I would categorize all as shadows of NYC.
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Old Mar 28, 12, 2:47 pm   #3
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Newark is a city, not a suburb, with its own identity. It's decrepit and the reason why Essex County property taxes are so abusively high.
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Old Mar 28, 12, 3:12 pm   #4
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It's a city and yet another reason I get mad when people call it "New York/Newark" Airport
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Old Mar 28, 12, 3:15 pm   #5
 
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Definitely NOT a suburb in any way shape of form.
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Old Mar 28, 12, 3:25 pm   #6
 
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Riding the train through Newark I got the impression it was some kind of time warp to show visitors what NYC was like before it was cleaned up
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Old Mar 28, 12, 3:47 pm   #7
 
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It is urban rather than suburban in character, but in the sense I think you are getting at it is a "suburb" of NY.

A hundred years ago I suspect that a town like West Orange would have been routinely identified as a suburb of Newark. Now such a label would be rare if not nonexistent - it is a suburb of New York. Newark isn't a central city any more.

The picture is complicated somewhat by legacies of the time it was more of a central city (Prudential; the older skyscrapers that are still around) and by the fact that it is the state's largest city and so attracts government involvement (e.g. NJ Performing Arts Center; federal buildings) as well as businesses that for legal/regulatory reasons are focused specifically on the NJ market (e.g. Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey).

Of course it has its identity just as many suburbs have their own identity, particularly if they have been settled for 300 years. But I think over the last 100 years the growth of the NY metropolitan area has swallowed it up, with the process accelerated by middle-class flight from 1950, particularly after the riots.
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Old Mar 28, 12, 4:16 pm   #8
 
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As you can tell from general responses ft worth to Dallas is perfect analogy.
Or Oakland to San Fran.

Ft. Worth was former industrial center with rail yards and it's own downtown, convention center and older character. However, remove the stock yards and it isn't worth the visit vs. nearby Dallas. It isn't as big as Newark but similar older looking downtown, and dead as night!

Funny comment on Essex county taxes.

Last edited by RooseveltL; Mar 28, 12 at 4:27 pm..
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Old Mar 28, 12, 9:31 pm   #9
 
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Hey guys. Thanks for all the input.

I created this thread due to what the news media have said about the North Jersey's East Rutherford and Lond Island's Uniondale.

I'd usually watch World Wrestling Entertainment whenever it airs a live pay-per-view from either the Meadowlands or Uniondale.

In 2007, WWE did a show at the Continental Airlines Arena. Check out this video-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSPzTs_g_jM

Fast forward to 3:22, and you will hear the announcers say "You are looking live at a sold-out Continental Airlines Arena in the shadow of the Big Apple".

And in 2008, WWE did a show at the Nassau Coliseum. Check out this video-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iqo53UijaE

Fast forward to 1:50:08, and you will hear the announcers say "And tonight we are in the shadow of New York City".

All these media outlets keep saying that both the Meadowlands and the Nassau Coliseum are located "in the shadow of NYC".

So I was wondering whether or not Newark could be considered situated in that same shadow as well.

After all, Newark is just south of East Rutherford.
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Old Mar 28, 12, 9:36 pm   #10
 
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Ah, what a question. You should consider coming to the even I am planning for September :-) (See CommunityBuzz for that)

Anyway, having taken classes in both the History of Newark, as well as the History of the American City, I will attempt to sum things up for you all. Appologies for any rambling.

Applying "normal" terminology for the New York City metropolitan area will make anyone go crazy. For example, "Downtown" New York is not the central business district, as "downtown" Chicago, Boston, or Los Angeles would be, it is actually just the lower portion of Manhattan.

In the same boat, New York, largely due to geographic limitations developed as an incredibly dense city, unlike other cities which are spread out, and continue to annex additional lands under the city limits. For comparison, New York is roughly 165 square miles of land.. Chicago is 234, and Los Angeles is 568.

If the Los Angeles City limits were overlaid over the New York area, the six largest cities in New Jersey, would be included in those boundaries (Newark included). New Jersey is in fact the only State to not have a MSA (Metropolitan Statistical Area) of its own. North Jersey is part of the Greater New York MSA, and South Jersey is part of the Greater Philadelphia MSA.

As far as what makes a suburb a suburb, you can look at a suburb which has an economic, social, or demographic tie to a larger city. If you consider the fact that people regularly commute up to two hours each way into New York, from Eastern Pennsylvania, Southern Connecticut, Southern New York State, and a good Portion of New Jersey, New York City's suburban reach is gigantic.

Newark is indeed a suburb of New York, but has its own suburbs, such as Belleville, Bloomfield, Irvington, East/West/"Regular" Orange, and Elizabeth, all of which are also suburbs of New York City.

Other such examples of Cities which are also New York Suburbs in the area are Trenton, New Brunswick, Paterson, Elizabeth in New Jersey, Poughkeepsie, Middletown, Newburgh, Yonkers in New York, Stanford and Greenwich in Connecticut, and even Allentown and Scranton in Pennsylvania.


I hope I have managed to not totally lose you all, and that this makes some sense to you.
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Old Mar 28, 12, 9:57 pm   #11
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Originally Posted by kwildnj View Post
Newark is indeed a suburb of New York, but has its own suburbs, such as Belleville, Bloomfield, Irvington, East/West/"Regular" Orange, and Elizabeth, all of which are also suburbs of New York City.
How is it that an urban area becomes a suburb? Has the definition (of urban/suburban) changed?
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Old Mar 28, 12, 10:28 pm   #12
 
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Originally Posted by nerd View Post
How is it that an urban area becomes a suburb? Has the definition (of urban/suburban) changed?
There is a difference between a locale being a suburb, and a location being suburban, at least as it applies to the NYC area.

As I said, most of the urban suburbs of New York would be part of the actual city in most other cities in the United States. However these urban areas serve as suburbs to both New York City, and in some cases a smaller city (such as Newark) as well.
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Old Mar 28, 12, 10:43 pm   #13
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Originally Posted by kwildnj View Post
As I said, most of the urban suburbs of New York...
No, my question is about your calling something an "urban suburb". If it's urban, then it's not suburban (by definition).
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Old Mar 28, 12, 11:04 pm   #14
 
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Originally Posted by nerd View Post
No, my question is about your calling something an "urban suburb". If it's urban, then it's not suburban (by definition).
As I explained before, there is a difference between a city and urban, just as there is a difference between a suburb and suburban.

The greater New York area is so densely populated, what is a suburb here, quite possibly be seen as a city in other parts of the United States.

The US Census defines an Urban Area as an area with more than 1000 people per square mile. By definition, the entire State of New Jersey is indeed "urban", having a population density of over 1100 persons per square mile.

The town in which I live, which has no building over 5 stories tall, a total of maybe 10 traffic lights, nearly 90% of the households living in single family homes at a population density of roughly 2800 persons per square mile is considered URBAN by definition, but is indeed a suburb of New York City, 25 miles away.
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Old Mar 28, 12, 11:11 pm   #15
 
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Originally Posted by kwildnj View Post
As I explained before, there is a difference between a city and urban, just as there is a difference between a suburb and suburban.

The greater New York area is so densely populated, what is a suburb here, quite possibly be seen as a city in other parts of the United States.

The US Census defines an Urban Area as an area with more than 1000 people per square mile. By definition, the entire State of New Jersey is indeed "urban", having a population density of over 1100 persons per square mile.

The town in which I live, which has no building over 5 stories tall, a total of maybe 10 traffic lights, nearly 90% of the households living in single family homes at a population density of roughly 2800 persons per square mile is considered URBAN by definition, but is indeed a suburb of New York City, 25 miles away.
Very interesting; I enjoyed reading your summary. So so you think would we be more accurate in referring to Newark as a "satellite city"?
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