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UA82 (EWR-DEL) Medical emergency diversion to LHR

UA82 (EWR-DEL) Medical emergency diversion to LHR

Old Mar 4, 18, 9:21 am
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UA82 (EWR-DEL) Medical emergency diversion to LHR

Just saw this on an Indian news site. Anyone have more details?

Last edited by sharmaintl; Mar 4, 18 at 9:22 am Reason: typo
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Old Mar 4, 18, 9:30 am
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Going east not much of a detour but one day delay?
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Old Mar 4, 18, 9:41 am
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Originally Posted by zitsky View Post
Going east not much of a detour but one day delay?
The article explains this: "The flight has now been cancelled due to the crew reaching their maximum duty time." Evidently UA didn't have a replacement crew available in London.
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Old Mar 4, 18, 10:01 am
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I know UA has LHR-based cabin crew but do they have LHR-based cockpit crews as well?
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Old Mar 4, 18, 10:08 am
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I would think at that point they would try and send passengers onward via LH or other carriers. What a disaster. And the passengers on the return flight are hosed too. Probably costs what, $250K for an incident like this?
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Old Mar 4, 18, 10:13 am
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Originally Posted by onthesam View Post
I know UA has LHR-based cabin crew but do they have LHR-based cockpit crews as well?
There are no flight crews based in LHR. Vast majority of pilots laying over are 757/767 qualified not 777 also.
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Old Mar 4, 18, 10:13 am
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Originally Posted by TA View Post
I would think at that point they would try and send passengers onward via LH or other carriers. What a disaster. And the passengers on the return flight are hosed too. Probably costs what, $250K for an incident like this?
Should United let someone die or be seriously debilitated because "oh no we would have to cancel the flight"? I understand that you're very likely not of this viewpoint but I just want to point out that that is the alternative.

There is no price for a human life.
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Old Mar 4, 18, 10:25 am
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Originally Posted by chermorg View Post
Should United let someone die or be seriously debilitated because "oh no we would have to cancel the flight"? I understand that you're very likely not of this viewpoint but I just want to point out that that is the alternative.

There is no price for a human life.
Sometimes, even a diversion is too late to save someone. If it happened after they reached London, what would be the next logical place to stop?
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Old Mar 4, 18, 10:30 am
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Originally Posted by zitsky View Post
Sometimes, even a diversion is too late to save someone. If it happened after they reached London, what would be the next logical place to stop?
That will depend on the flight path of the day, the seriousness of the emergency, the time, resources available at airports and hospitals, and many other factors. I highly doubt United would have diverted if there was not a good chance of survival.

That being said, I am curious as to how the crew times out. A medical diversion shouldn't take more than an hour and to my knowledge the crew should have easily had an hour butter built in.
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Old Mar 4, 18, 10:36 am
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Originally Posted by zitsky View Post
Sometimes, even a diversion is too late to save someone. If it happened after they reached London, what would be the next logical place to stop?
Without looking MOW or ARN. On a SIN-EWR a few years ago we doubled back after almost three hours in the air. NRT was just over three more at the point we turned back.
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Old Mar 4, 18, 10:50 am
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The fact that the onward segment was delayed by a day does not mean that all passengers were delayed by a day. Many would likely have asked to be rerouted and, presuming availability, UA would likely accomodate on a 24-hour delay. That, however, can be a mess for premium pax as last minute F/J on LH may be problematic.
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Old Mar 4, 18, 11:00 am
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Originally Posted by chermorg View Post
Should United let someone die or be seriously debilitated because "oh no we would have to cancel the flight"? I understand that you're very likely not of this viewpoint but I just want to point out that that is the alternative.

There is no price for a human life.
Well of course we're going to divert. I'm asking how much this costs the airline.

And, friend, if you believe that no price is put on human life by corporations, policy makers, any rational person responsible for the lives of others -- you need to find out more about how the world works!

Of course I also understand you may just be writing "There is no price for a human life" as a polite saying that people say to other strangers in cases like this.
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Old Mar 4, 18, 11:06 am
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Originally Posted by TA View Post
And, friend, if you believe that no price is put on human life by corporations, policy makers, any rational person responsible for the lives of others -- you seriously need to find out more about how the world works!
While I agree with this when it comes to high-level business decisions, I'd be curious to know if airlines put a 'price' on a human life when it comes to a diversion. From what I've read, companies like Medaire determine if a diversion is necessary based on condition and not cost, but I seriously do wonder if airlines have ever disregarded their contracted professional's advice to divert.
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Old Mar 4, 18, 11:22 am
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Originally Posted by onthesam View Post
I know UA has LHR-based cabin crew but do they have LHR-based cockpit crews as well?
EWR-DEL is staffed with sub CO FAs so none of the sub UA FAs based in LHR would be able to continue the flight onto DEL.
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Old Mar 4, 18, 11:23 am
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Originally Posted by pushmyredbutton View Post
While I agree with this when it comes to high-level business decisions, I'd be curious to know if airlines put a 'price' on a human life when it comes to a diversion. From what I've read, companies like Medaire determine if a diversion is necessary based on condition and not cost, but I seriously do wonder if airlines have ever disregarded their contracted professional's advice to divert.
Reputational risk would be astronomical.
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