Travel attire

Old Feb 22, 17, 4:19 pm
  #16  
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Originally Posted by Pats View Post
Refreshing to hear. I have, over the years, seen some atrocious abominations, even in F, plimsoles, anoraks, even ladies in t-shirts! I suppose the golden age of flying when people took pride in appearance are long gone. Don't get me wrong, I'm not suggesting we make ourselves uncomfortable but what's wrong with a Givenchy or Versace twin set for the ladies and at least smart slacks and a lovely jacket for the gents
This gave me a little chuckle.
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Old Feb 22, 17, 10:08 pm
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Originally Posted by emma69 View Post
There's nothing comfy to me about flying in wool,
I'm allergic to wool, and all itchy while trapped in the flying metal tube is an outer circle of hell for me. Usual flight garb for me is stretch khakis, cotton sweater layered over a single color t-shirt, and the tiger print Dansko clogs of butt-kicking that are both comfortable and likely to draw a 'cool shoes!' from male and female security screeners.

Save for the shoes, I'm as generic-looking of a middle class white American woman as you can get, and tend to just blend into the background enough that no one really notices I'm there.
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Old Feb 23, 17, 2:33 am
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Originally Posted by Pats View Post
Refreshing to hear. I have, over the years, seen some atrocious abominations, even in F, plimsoles, anoraks, even ladies in t-shirts! I suppose the golden age of flying when people took pride in appearance are long gone. Don't get me wrong, I'm not suggesting we make ourselves uncomfortable but what's wrong with a Givenchy or Versace twin set for the ladies and at least smart slacks and a lovely jacket for the gents
Despite having been on FT for a year and a half, I'm still amazed sometimes by the attitudes displayed here.
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Old Feb 23, 17, 6:04 am
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I travel most often in comfortable clothes with extra button down pockets (e.g. cargo pants/shorts.) On those rare occasions when I need to travel in something nicer I haven't noticed any different in treatment.

There are better things to do than spend time judging what other people are wearing on a flight. Should my lack of sartorial splendor dismay or offend fellow passengers that is their burden to bear and they should do so in silence.
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Old Feb 23, 17, 7:01 am
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The question the article asks is what happened to what was once considered culturally excepted and acceptable. The picture accompanying the article indicates an era that just doesn't exist anymore. Once luxury becomes available to the masses it is no longer luxury. You're just not going to see, from a general standpoint, and in this case specifically, good and decent and thought out in-flight fashion when everyone can afford to fly.

The author's reflection on her mother's lessons in fashion sensibility is the transcendent take-away. When flying, men are not going to wear 1930's era three piece suits. Women are not going to wear dresses like Marylin Monroe. Let's be honest, that was almost 90 years ago. I do think, however, there is a cultural expectation line that should not be crossed. While I might wear jeans, I will never wear the kind on which scissors have been dulled. My fashion will never include big honking chains down to my knees to keep my wallet close at hand. I definitely want the ladies to be comfortable, but some of these yoga pants look too much like body paint. As my mom says, "They leave nothing to the imagination". As I say, some of them don't even belong in the gym.

The author's mother's teaching, "It’s not what you wear, it’s how you carry yourself in it", is true but leaves the door far too open for personal interpretation which I suggest is how we arrived at the modern travel fashion sense. I think most of us here would agree the statement, what we wear represents who we are and what we are about, and so we dress accordingly.
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Old Feb 23, 17, 7:15 am
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Perfect long-haul flight attire:

Fleecy rugby top, black sweatpants and grandad slippers. Never failed me yet.
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Old Feb 23, 17, 7:23 am
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Originally Posted by Pats View Post
....even ladies in t-shirts!
No!! Say it isn't so!
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Old Feb 23, 17, 8:21 am
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Originally Posted by jinglish View Post
Despite having been on FT for a year and a half, I'm still amazed sometimes by the attitudes displayed here.
I took that particular post as tongue-in-cheek...

It's unclear to me if the original article is tongue-in-cheek, lampooning tired travel-attire fluff pieces in general.

Somebody should write appropriate-attire pieces about other forms of public transit. We've got airplanes covered. Personally, I think a three-piece suit should be required on the NYC subway.
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Old Feb 23, 17, 8:26 am
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Originally Posted by tvtd View Post
I think most of us here would agree the statement, what we wear represents who we are and what we are about, and so we dress accordingly.
Based on that quaint conclusion I am "about" comfort and functionality. I am also emotionally secure enough to not give a rat's patoot about the opinions of self-appointed arbiters of what is acceptable fashion on public transit. YMMV.
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Old Feb 23, 17, 8:54 am
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Originally Posted by davie355 View Post
I prefer button-up shirts with front pockets because ...the pocket holds boarding passes.
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Old Feb 23, 17, 9:01 am
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For modern traveling, function beats form every time. My standard flying attire are elastic-waisted pants with deep pockets; a T-shirt or polo shirt with a silk oversight, a polartec jacket, and a trail vest, with either Merrell jungle mocs, Keen sandals, or mukluks, depending on the season and destination. I do not detect any attitude as a result; I agree with those who say it's more about how you treat others.

The biggest difference in the way I've been treated over my traveling life has been over whether or not I had a guitar with me. Customs folk see guitar and long to inspect the insides.

wg
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Old Feb 23, 17, 9:03 am
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Standard attire: Short sleeve button down with a front pocket, comfort fit jeans, gym shoes, belt with low metal content, and My Little Pony underwear* (Adult male XL). All items of clothing in good condition and not stained, torn, or wrinkled.

Short sleeves because I get hot easily, and while sitting at the gate before the air flow picks up I don't want to sweat. The front pocket on the shirt ensures I don't have to screw with my pants pockets at all mid-flight.

*Actual choice in underwear may vary.
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Old Feb 23, 17, 9:11 am
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I don't care what other people wear, but for me (1) I need lots of pockets for electronics and other items. Yeah, I suppose cargo pants would work, but I think a blazer is better. And (2) I am usually traveling for business and I like to travel light, so any jeans or polo shirts would be surplusage. And I want to be ready in case a checked bag is delayed. So I tend to be business casual, with a tie in my carryon, so I am ready to go to my first meeting whether the bag shows up or not. Works well for me. In some countries, I also sense that I am treated better than a tourist if I look like a business traveler. YMMV.
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Old Feb 23, 17, 10:24 am
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Originally Posted by Badenoch View Post
Based on that quaint conclusion I am "about" comfort and functionality. I am also emotionally secure enough to not give a rat's patoot about the opinions of self-appointed arbiters of what is acceptable fashion on public transit. YMMV.
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Old Feb 23, 17, 11:06 am
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What my fellow passengers wear on board is certainly none of my business. I might be amused and envious at the pax, who appears to still be wearing pajama attire and clutching a pillow as they board. Good for them.

For business travel, I am always "Business Casual" or full suit and tie, depending on what my appointments dictate on arrival. No choice. And I only travel domestic US for business, so no extreme long haul flights.

For leisure travel, I dress for the destination and comfort.
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