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Documentation for intl. travel with minor child who's not my own?

Documentation for intl. travel with minor child who's not my own?

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Old Jun 20, 05, 12:19 pm
  #1  
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Travel with Minor Internationally

Does anyone know where to download the form for absent parent consent?
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Old Jun 20, 05, 4:51 pm
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Do you want the form to apply for a passport for a minor under 14 when one parent won't be present?


Statement of Consent: Issuance of a Passport to a Minor Under Age 14: DS-3053
http://travel.state.gov/passport/for...s3053_846.html


Or do you want a form that says it's okay for one parent to travel internationally without the other parent? If that's the case then you can pretty much write your own letter (but have it notarized)...

From http://www.singleparenttravel.net
"Not only do documentation requirements change based on your destination and how you enter the country (sea, land, or air), but also it changes based on the whim of the airline, cruise and customs officials. Our advice: err on the side of over-documentation. We recommend a notarized letter of consent from the other parent of your child. Some countries, like the UK, do not require it for arrival by air, but laws may change at the last minute, so double check before departure. Call the consulate of your destination. Remember to tell them how you are entering the country: by air, sea or land. It makes a difference.
...
ENTRY INTO THE UNITED KINGDOM
http://www.britainusa.com

According to Steve Thompson at the NY British Consulate the only thing required to get into the UK for an adult and minor child is a passport, a return ticket and spending money. Continental Airlines confirmed this, but added that it would be better if a single parent traveled with a notarized permission letter.
...
ENTRY INTO CANADA
(From http://www.travelcanada.ca) "Travelers visiting Canada with children should carry the following: 1.Identification for each child similar to identification described for adults. 2. A letter of permission from the parents of any children accompanying them for whom they do not have legal custody. Please note: Divorced parents with shared custody rights should carry legal documents establishing their status. Unaccompanied children should carry a letter of permission from their parents or a legal guardian."
...
ENTRY INTO MEXICO
(From the Mexican Consular's Web site http://www.consulmexny.org/eng/english.htm)
"Minors (individuals under the age of 18) traveling alone, with only one parent or with someone other than his/her parents must have a notarized letter of consent, signed by both parents or the absent parent. If parents are divorced, a Parental Custody document is permissible in lieu of notarized letter."

Sample authorization letter
http://www.singleparenttravel.net/Wr...izedLetter.htm


ARUBA If traveling with a guardian other than a parent, a notarized letter in triplicate from both parents authorizing travel, and a photo ID is also required. Moreover, the letter should state the name of the person with whom the child is traveling. A letter is not required if traveling with only one parent. If the child's last name is different from the last name of the accompanying parent(s), proof of parentage is required. Parents name changes must be documented (i.e. marriage certificate).

Dominican Republic law requires that children under 18 on the day of departure traveling with an adult or guardian other than their parent, present written authorization from the parent(s). This authorization must state that the parent(s) have given consent for the child to leave the country. The letter must be written in Spanish and notarized at a Dominican Consulate in the United States. If the child is traveling with only one parent, the letter is not necessary. In addition, Dominican immigration authorities have recently begun restricting the ability of children to depart the country with only a birth certificate, especially when those children are American citizens of Dominican heritage. Because of this policy, the Embassy strongly urges that children who normally reside in the United States obtain a passport in the U.S. before traveling to the Dominican Republic. If the child's last name differs from the last name of the accompanying parent(s), proof of parentage is required. Parent's name change must be documented (i.e. marriage certificate).

Last edited by jonesing; Jun 20, 05 at 4:53 pm
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Old Jun 21, 05, 8:46 am
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Thank you very much. My son and I are traveling to Taipei this summer.

Since he and I are connecting on Eva in LAX, it is better to have the consent letter just in case. It would not be cool to be left behind in LA. My sister traveled with her children to Mexico a few years ago. Her EX had to go to the airline counter to sign consent before they were allowed to leave the contry. She was lucky that she was not thousands of miles into her journey already.

Nancy
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Old Jun 27, 05, 7:18 am
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entering US?

Do I understand correctly that no permission is required to enter the US?

Kaye
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Old Jun 28, 05, 9:24 am
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For returning US residents, passports should be sufficient.
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Old Aug 5, 05, 11:30 am
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travel without parents

Does anyone know of a downloadable permission form to allow a child to travel out of the country without parents? My 16 year old will be traveling with a friend and her parents on a Caribbean cruise and I want to make sure she doesn't have a problem.

Thanks,
RWW
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Old Aug 6, 05, 2:06 pm
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Originally Posted by RoadWarriorWidow
Does anyone know of a downloadable permission form to allow a child to travel out of the country without parents? My 16 year old will be traveling with a friend and her parents on a Caribbean cruise and I want to make sure she doesn't have a problem.

Thanks,
RWW
Here's the one I got from a travel agent and have used for years to take my granddaughter on trips and cruises. It's been accepted without question by every airline and cruise line we've used. It needs to be notarized and you should get a couple of copies notarized. Check to see if the cruiseline needs it in advance. I was surprised that Carnival wanted it faxed to them in advance (they wouldn't release our group's tickets until they received the permission form) as none of the other lines needed it in advance, just at check-in. I also don't know if both parents need to sign it or only one but I always get both of her parents to execute a copy, just in case:

LETTER OF CONSENT TO TRAVEL
FOR MINOR CHILD ______(full name of child)____________.

I, (insert parent/parents' names), hereby grant permission for my/our minor daughter/son _____(name of child)_______________________ (D.O.B. ____________) to travel with ___(if there are two adults traveling, it's a good idea to put both adults' names on the form in case something happens to one of them during the trip)_______________________________ on the ____ (name specific cruise line AND name of cruise ship)____ to ____(name ports of call, countries, etc here)____ and any other ports of call as determined by ____ (name cruise line here)____, which is scheduled to sail from the Port of _____________ on _______(date)______ and return to Port of _________________ on ______(date)_________ AND/OR _____________ Airlines, flights _________________, or any other flights necessary as determined by __________ Airlines.

During those dates, _____(name of adult/adults)___________________ will be responsible for the supervision of _________(name of child)_______________ and has/have my permission to authorize any emergency medical, surgical, dental or anesthesiology treatments necessary for the well-being of ________(name of child)______________.

Signed:

________________________________________
(mother's name), mother of _______________, a minor child.

________________________________________
(father's name), father of ________________, a minor child

Parent's emergency contact numbers:
Home: ______________
Work: _______________
Cell: ________________


Signature of Notary: ________________
Notary's printed name: _______________
My commission expires: _______________
Notary seal:
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Old Aug 6, 05, 11:23 pm
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You might also wanted to give then a medical release form with allergies and her doctor info as well as her blood type and so on .
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Old Aug 7, 05, 10:30 am
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Thank you!!!

Thanks so much for the replies! I hadn't even considered a medical release, but that could be so important in an emergency. The friend's parents thought all I needed was a birth certificate. I can imagine what a bummer it would be to be denied boarding at the last minute and did a little looking online to find out what really is required. I knew there had to be a release to travel without parents, but couldn't find a form. This really helps!

RWW
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Old Aug 7, 05, 7:26 pm
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Its one thing to meet the liability release of the American airline/ship. It is another to meet the entry requirements of the other country. I just happened across this on the Northwest Airlines site:

Quote:

International Travel With Minors (including Canada & Mexico)
Due to international concern over child abduction, many governments have initiated additional requirements at arrival and departure points when children under 18 years old are not traveling with both parents. Many countries require documentary evidence of the adults' relationship and permission of the parent(s) or legal guardian before they will allow the child to cross the border. Single parents, grandparents or guardians traveling with children often need proof of custody or notarized letters from the other parent authorizing travel. These requirements are in addition to passport or proof of citizenship requirements.

Minor traveling with one parent: If a minor child is traveling with only one parent, the absent parent is expected to provide notarized consent. If only one parent has legal custody, that parent should be prepared to provide a court order of child custody to airlines and international authorities.
Minor traveling alone: If a minor child is traveling alone or in someone else's company, both parents (or the sole, documented custodial parent) must provide notarized consent.
Minor with a different last name: If a child traveling has a different last name from the mother and/or father, the parents should be prepared to provide evidence to airlines and official authorities, such as a birth certificate or adoption decree, to prove that they are the parents.
Minor has one deceased parent: If one parent is deceased, a death certificate is required.
Minor has one parent: If the birth certificate shows that the minor only has one parent, it will be sufficient to hold only a notarized copy of the birth certificate.

Travelers should be aware that Mexican entry regulations require any unaccompanied minor under the age of 14 to be met by an adult.


Documentation Requirements to Enter and/or Return from Canada/Mexico/Caribbean

US Citizens Traveling to Canada from the U.S.
You will need proof of U.S. citizenship such as:

U.S. passport (information on how to obtain a U.S. passport)
Original or certified copy of your birth certificate, plus photo identification.


New U.S. Passport Requirements for U.S., Canadian, Mexican, Caribbean Travel
U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has announced a new passport initiative which will phase in new requirements over the next three years for all travelers to and from the Americas (including Mexico, Panama, and Canada), the Caribbean, and Bermuda. This will require a passport or other accepted form of documentation when entering the United States. This initiative will be implemented in phases, with the proposed timeline as follows:
On December 31, 2005 - All U.S., Canadian and Bermudian nationals will be required to hold a passport to enter the United States if coming from the Caribbean, Central and South America by air and by sea.
On December 31, 2006 - The requirement will be applied to all air and sea travel to or from Mexico and Canada.
On December 31, 2007 - The requirement will be extended to all air, sea, and land border crossings.
For more information please visit: www.travel.state.gov or www.dhs.gov

End quote.


I had not seen before the new passport requirements for US citizens listed above. Looks like after Dec.31 every cruise passenger in the Caribbean is going to need a passport?

Also, while researching visa requirements for some countries I have seen the notation that the above required documents must be translated into their language and notarized. You got that form in Spanish, Portugese, or Chinese?

I would look up the specific requirements of the countries you are planning to visit at their embassy web site. Look for links on the State Dept. site above
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Old Aug 8, 05, 2:47 pm
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Originally Posted by Flaflyer
I had not seen before the new passport requirements for US citizens listed above. Looks like after Dec.31 every cruise passenger in the Caribbean is going to need a passport?

Also, while researching visa requirements for some countries I have seen the notation that the above required documents must be translated into their language and notarized. You got that form in Spanish, Portugese, or Chinese?

I would look up the specific requirements of the countries you are planning to visit at their embassy web site. Look for links on the State Dept. site above
Yeah.... travel to the Caribbean with a bunch of family members will be a lot more of a hassle and expense once the Dec. 31 requirements hit. It's going to cut out last minute trips for sure. Expedited passports are expensive.

I'm so glad my kid is only going to English speaking countries. I wouldn't even know how to start getting translated documents. Guess that means she has to drag me along on any European jaunts

Now I'm worried about the validity of her 2 year old school photo ID. The cruise line says it's not a problem as long as she looks like the picture. Really bad timing to lose her current school ID. Other than what the cruise line tells me, I haven't found anything definitive about whether a 2 year old school photo ID will be a problem.

RWW
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Old Apr 21, 07, 2:21 pm
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? minor traveling with grandparents

My son is taking a trip with my parents in late May to Colorado. Because of his ticket being bought after my parents', the airline filed it as an unaccompanied minor (though he is NOT, and I really hope they didn't get charged the extra for it) It was my parents who booked the trip and although they are seasoned travelers, they haven't taken him by themselves before, and they (my parents) seemed overly concerned about him having ID. (He's 11)

Does he need government issued ID? I have his "safe kids" ID that the school issued and it has a picture. And do new regulations require that they have a notorized statement from his father and me stating it's ok for him to travel with my parents? I cannot get a good read why my mother seemed so concerned, whether it was because the airline told her she needed the ID, or because she's just being her usual worrywart self.

Shoot, I think him being an unaccompanied minor would almost be easier at this point, because certainly the last few times he flew unaccompanied, there was no issues about ID or anything. I can easily get him government issued ID as well as the notorized statement, so should I just take the time to do it?
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Old Apr 21, 07, 2:39 pm
  #13  
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SolSolstice, I am going to move this thread over to the Travel With Children Forum. Please follow there.
Thanks..
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Old Apr 21, 07, 4:49 pm
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I think you should (for many reasons) get s parental consent form signed and give them to your parents. This should quell any inquiries from the airlines or other agencies who may question why your son is traveling with your parents alone. Many airline personel dont know their own policies when it comes to UM's. The parental consent form should do the trick. Also does you son have the same last name as your parents? If so this should help make adding your son to their reservation a little easier and should save them the UMNR Fees.
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Old Apr 21, 07, 7:36 pm
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Originally Posted by TheTrustedTraveler View Post
I think you should (for many reasons) get s parental consent form signed and give them to your parents. This should quell any inquiries from the airlines or other agencies who may question why your son is traveling with your parents alone. Many airline personel dont know their own policies when it comes to UM's. The parental consent form should do the trick. Also does you son have the same last name as your parents? If so this should help make adding your son to their reservation a little easier and should save them the UMNR Fees.
A little off topic, but I have a good friend who is a lawyer, and he insisted that I have a limited power of attorney form with me when I took his daughter and son on a skiing trip with my son. It would be needed if they needed medical treatment of any type. Probably not a bad idea....... Luckily it wasn't needed, I brought them back in more or less one piece!
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