Do Not Fly List

Old Jul 1, 06, 8:50 am
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Programs: Hilton, Delta, USAirways
Posts: 5
Do Not Fly List

I was placed on the TSA Do Not Fly List in early April. I submitted my paperwork to TSA who sent me a "clear" letter by the end of April. They turned around this clearance within about 10 business days of receiving the paperwork that I had been asked to provide. Basically the letter said that I was not the person that they were looking for and that I should be able to use regular check-in procedures but would still be subject to security screenings on the way back to the gate.

Prior to receiving the letter from TSA, I would have to check in at the ticket counter; however, once I started my trip, I would be permitted to use the kiosks to check in on my return flights.

Since receiving my letter from TSA at the end of April, I have had the opportunity to fly on Northwest, Continental, USAirways and Delta. Only Delta has failed to clear me to use the kiosks or the on-line check-in service. I called TSA and spoke to the Omsbudsmen who informed me that they send a file to the airlines after reviewing my paperwork and that they have taken the steps they need to take. I was referred back to Delta.

Since that time, I have spoken to two customer service centers and sent an e-mail inquiring when I might be able to use any of the expedited check-in methods. A representative called me back after my e-mail (about 3 weeks later) and referred me back to TSA who referred me back to Delta. After that, I sent a certified letter to Delta's CEO along w/ a copy of the letter I received from TSA, requesting information about whether and when I might be able to uses the expedited check-in procedures again. This letter was received on the 21st of June.

I guess sending this letter was a mistake since on my last flight w/ Delta this week, I was forced to use the ticket counter both on my outbound and my return flights (where as prior to the letter, I only used the ticket counter on my outbound and could use the kiosk on my return flights). On one of my last legs, I told the Delta agent that I did not think that I was supposed to be subject to the screening after I began my travel. When he hung up from speaking to TSA he said that the TSA agent said the same thing to him.

Now I understand that security is in the hands of TSA and am personally fine w/ whatever security measures that need to be taken. I am a bit perplexed over why I continue to have this issue at Delta who I fly nearly weekly and not at the other airlines that I fly only occasionally.

I would appreciate anyone's thoughts around this. Are there any steps that I should take that I haven't to try to resolve this matter? If the answer is this is the way it will be when I fly Delta, then perhaps I will need to consider flying on the carriers who do not require these additional measures.
Gus06 is offline  
Old Jul 1, 06, 10:03 am
  #2  
FlyerTalk Evangelist & Moderator: CommunityBuzz!, OMNI, OMNI/PR, and OMNI/Games
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Southern California
Programs: DL: 3.8 MM, Marriott: Lifetime Titanium
Posts: 24,570
While you may get some feedback on this in the DL forum, your question might better be asked in the Travel Safety/Security Forum. We see a lot of similar situations to yours and the folks in the TS/S Forum are knowledgeable and helpful in these matters.
Perhaps a DL mod will transfer this thread to TS/S with a re-direct left here in the DL Forum.
At any rate, Gus06, good luck in getting this resolved.
Cholula is offline  
Old Jul 1, 06, 10:28 am
  #3  
Moderator: Travel with Pets
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Programs: DL FO, Marriott Gold, SPG Gold
Posts: 11,992
I am moving this topic over to the TS/S forum.

Rssrsvp - Moderator
RSSrsvp is offline  
Old Jul 1, 06, 11:42 am
  #4  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: DCA/IAD
Programs: AA Gold, Amex Plat
Posts: 3,938
Change the name on your future tickets and on your frequent flyer accounts to your first name plus full middle name; your first initial only; or a nickname (i.e. if your name is Robert, use "Bobby" even if that's not what you go by).

Sorry, but that's the only way you'll truly be able to fly hassle-free. The letter from the TSA is nothing other than an affirmation that you are not the person by the same name that they're looking for. The name is still on the list, and with that name you will keep running into delays at the ticket counter for as long as that person is caught, or no longer deemed a security threat for whatever asinine reason TSA thinks he is.

Airlines' computer systems are not sophisticated enough to tell who's who, even if one "Robert Brown" (just to use an example of the many common Anglo-American names on the list) is a million-mile Platinum Medallion and the other Robert Brown is the fugitive TSA wants. The answer? Every single Robert Brown flying in the U.S. will be subject to a lengthy document check when checking in, and can't use the kiosk on his outbound trip. Robert Browns who book as "Bob Brown," "R Brown" or "Robert Thomas Brown," however, don't get flagged and can check in normally.

The latter fact alone shows the stupidity of the whole no-fly list, as of course the "real" Robert Brown on the watch list can use his middle name or "Bob" and fly freely.
wahooflyer is offline  
Old Jul 1, 06, 12:59 pm
  #5  
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: MCO - Where's the Admirals Club?
Programs: AA Plat, HH Gold, MR Gold
Posts: 1,268
Originally Posted by wahooflyer
Change the name on your future tickets and on your frequent flyer accounts to your first name plus full middle name; your first initial only; or a nickname (i.e. if your name is Robert, use "Bobby" even if that's not what you go by).

Sorry, but that's the only way you'll truly be able to fly hassle-free. The letter from the TSA is nothing other than an affirmation that you are not the person by the same name that they're looking for. The name is still on the list, and with that name you will keep running into delays at the ticket counter for as long as that person is caught, or no longer deemed a security threat for whatever asinine reason TSA thinks he is.

Airlines' computer systems are not sophisticated enough to tell who's who, even if one "Robert Brown" (just to use an example of the many common Anglo-American names on the list) is a million-mile Platinum Medallion and the other Robert Brown is the fugitive TSA wants. The answer? Every single Robert Brown flying in the U.S. will be subject to a lengthy document check when checking in, and can't use the kiosk on his outbound trip. Robert Browns who book as "Bob Brown," "R Brown" or "Robert Thomas Brown," however, don't get flagged and can check in normally.

The latter fact alone shows the stupidity of the whole no-fly list, as of course the "real" Robert Brown on the watch list can use his middle name or "Bob" and fly freely.
If this simple step is indeed all that is needed to resolve the OP's problem, (and let fugitives slip through)....... Holy $#!+ !!!!!!!!!!!, how truly asinine our government can be.
SlowTrekker is offline  
Old Jul 1, 06, 1:06 pm
  #6  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Under an ORD approach path
Programs: DL PM, MM. Coffee isn't a drug, it's a vitamin.
Posts: 12,922
Originally Posted by SlowTrekker
If this simple step is indeed all that is needed to resolve the OP's problem, (and let fugitives slip through)....... Holy $#!+ !!!!!!!!!!!, how truly asinine our government can be.
I hope you're being sarcastic and not genuinely surprised.
Gargoyle is offline  
Old Jul 1, 06, 1:09 pm
  #7  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: DCA/IAD
Programs: AA Gold, Amex Plat
Posts: 3,938
Originally Posted by SlowTrekker
If this simple step is indeed all that is needed to resolve the OP's problem, (and let fugitives slip through)....... Holy $#!+ !!!!!!!!!!!, how truly asinine our government can be.
It most certainly is all that's needed. A friend of mine is named Robert Brown (that's why I used that name as an example) and, sure enough, booking tickets as "Bobby Brown" on the same airline he flew before as "Robert Brown" works fine. The ID checkers know that Bobby is short for Robert, so he's never had a problem getting through the security line even though his driver's license says Robert.

I wouldn't be so alarmist, though. After all, the government doesn't tell us why anyone on the no-fly list (other than the obvious, meaning Al Qaeda members) is on it. They can put it all under the guise of SSI. The Robert Brown on the list may not be a security threat at all by any measure of common sense...we really don't know.
wahooflyer is offline  
Old Jul 1, 06, 6:07 pm
  #8  
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Ohio
Programs: DL, US, AA, Marriott Silver
Posts: 191
Originally Posted by wahooflyer
The ID checkers know that Bobby is short for Robert, so he's never had a problem getting through the security line even though his driver's license says Robert.
Not so fast my friend. Everything I have in my wallet has James listed on it. On my first trip for a new job, I was handed a ticket with Jim, which is what I use in everyday circumstances.

The ID checker asked if I had anything with Jim on it, and after a momemt of shock. I remembered that I have one credit card that was inadvertantly issued with Jim.

She accepted it, but it hasn't happened again. I am sure that Delta or a supervisor could have rectified the problem. But in that one instance -- at MGM -- it was a hassle in the making.
jims66 is offline  
Old Jul 1, 06, 9:04 pm
  #9  
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ireland, UnderH20, AUA, WNY (ROC)
Programs: Delta Charter KM, RW, PM, SC, SkyBonus; HH Diamond, IHG Plt Amb, Global Ent, TWIC
Posts: 2,191
I agree with jims66.


I was denied boarding on a Contintental flight to Mexico because my ticket was issued under a nickname and did not match my passport. Luckily, my law enforcement ID was in the same name and they allowed me to board but since then I have made sure that all of my tickets are issued in the same format as my passport.

Maybe some people are lucky.
jackplum is offline  
Old Jul 1, 06, 9:49 pm
  #10  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: NYC
Programs: Gold MileagePlus
Posts: 183
Air France Requires a Whole slew of Personal Info from Travel Agents

Originally Posted by jackplum
I agree with jims66.


I was denied boarding on a Contintental flight to Mexico because my ticket was issued under a nickname and did not match my passport. Luckily, my law enforcement ID was in the same name and they allowed me to board but since then I have made sure that all of my tickets are issued in the same format as my passport.

Maybe some people are lucky.
I was told that travel agents will be required soon to put in a passenger's reservation the full name including full middle names, nationality, passport numner, expiration date, date of issue, gender, birth place, home address.

Air France already requires this now when an agent attempts to issue one of their tickets. A prompt appears asking for this info.

Therefore, one had better be prepared to change all one's frequent flyer accounts to to the name as it will be required on a ticket or you may not receive your miles.
dusdidt is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search Engine: