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3:45 on the JFK Tarmac and Delta's AWOL

3:45 on the JFK Tarmac and Delta's AWOL

Old Aug 15, 17, 6:38 pm
  #61  
 
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Originally Posted by ProfRB View Post
I have no earthly idea whether we were refueling. I know we were not standing in line -- we stood in line for the first couple of hours, then moved to a vacant "holding" area on the tarmac. All I know is that we were parked a long way from the terminal, with an open door and no gate-thingy or stairs. Disembarking, even if it had been allowed, would have been about a 20' drop. I can't imagine that's what DOT had in mind by the "opportunity to deplane" rule.
Not on a regional jet. It's only like 5 feet. When I worked in airport ops, it was not uncommon to send a fuel truck to a remote ramp to refuel a plane that had been sitting in line too long. It usually requires having a door open and stairs/jetway connected. The CRJ also has builtin stairs on the pax door, so that makes it easier. Since you were taken out of line and put on a ramp, there's a chance they were adding fuel (especially if they had already mentioned that they needed to limit the taxi burn due to the delay).
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Old Aug 16, 17, 6:29 am
  #62  
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Originally Posted by telloh View Post
I don't know how the DOT will interpret the original poster's circumstance, but the tarmac delay clock stops when the flight "begins the process of returning to a suitable disembarkation point to deplane passengers."
I don't know either how DOT interprets the word "begins": it could mean starting the process of getting permission to return to the gate (which would be independent of whether the door is open) or it could require actual movement of an aircraft or jetway in which case this could not happen while the door is open. If it's the former case, an aircraft could be parked at the gate and require a GA to open the door, but if a GA doesn't appear for an additional ten hours, should the carrier get a free pass?
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