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Are CBP checkpoint overseas equivalent to local checkpoints?

Are CBP checkpoint overseas equivalent to local checkpoints?

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Old Jul 14, 18, 2:32 am
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Are CBP checkpoint overseas equivalent to local checkpoints?

It just dawned on me that there are some CBP preclearance checkpoint overseas.

Are these checkpoint equivalent to local ones? In other words would I need to reclear CBP or TSA when I land stateside?
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Old Jul 14, 18, 2:59 am
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With pre clearance checkpoint you arrive at what is basically a domestic terminal. So no need to re-clear CBP or TSA.
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Old Jul 14, 18, 3:35 am
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Originally Posted by Rommie2k6 View Post
It just dawned on me that there are some CBP preclearance checkpoint overseas.

Are these checkpoint equivalent to local ones? In other words would I need to reclear CBP or TSA when I land stateside?
For most purposes for most people, they are functionally equivalent in that you wouldn’t need to reclear CBP or TSA on arrival at US territory.
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Old Jul 14, 18, 5:30 am
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CBP preclearance locations do have one practical difference for US citizens: onward travel to the US is de-facto at the discretion of CBP.

A US citizen at other points of entry may be detained for secondary screening, and may have his or her belongings searched or seized, but ultimately they cannot be refused entry to the US. At a preclearance checkpoint, CBP may not be able to technically deny entry to US citizens, but they can detain them long enough to make them miss the day's flights. Lather, rinse, repeat.

This is not hypothetical; I was relatively recently coerced this way at DUB preclearance (i.e. directly threatened with being sent to secondary with the clear implication that I would not be allowed to fly) to answer questions about my employment and whether I or other members of my family hold any other nationalities - questions that I would not have to answer at a stateside checkpoint. I did not have the luxury at the time of taking a principled stand, but neither do I plan to return to the US via DUB on future trips.
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Old Jul 14, 18, 6:22 am
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The entire purpose of Pre-Clearance is to avoid the necessity of clearance on arrival at a standard FIS. While, in very rare circumstances, CBP may choose to conduct a secondary inspection on arrival, when you arrive at your US POE, you will almost certainly be processed as any arriving domestic passenger and therefore, if connecting, will only need to pass through a TSA checkpoint if there is no airside physical route to your new departure gate. But, that would occur on a domestic connection as well.
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Old Jul 14, 18, 11:22 am
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Originally Posted by Often1 View Post
The entire purpose of Pre-Clearance is to avoid the necessity of clearance on arrival at a standard FIS.
That is not the entire purpose of CBP preclearance — and it wasn’t the purpose even before CBP was created and staffed Preclearance as such.

There has been more than one purpose involved in the US setting up Preclearance facilities abroad. Some of it was commercially/budget related, some of it security related, some of it to assist countries’ economies/people, and/or a combination of those. The outcome from pursuit for such purposes is a reduction in the necessity of and some problems related to clearance efforts on arrivals at US ports proper.
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Old Yesterday, 12:36 pm
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Originally Posted by Often1 View Post
[...] if connecting, will only need to pass through a TSA checkpoint if there is no airside physical route to your new departure gate.
Pretty much. For example, flew DUB-PHL. Went through DUB security, then DUB preclearence FIS security. Arrived in PHL, just walked to next gate.

Same goes for BOS if you're flying Aer Lingus or Westjet (provided you're flying jetBlue or Delta)

Air Canada, not so much... considering the gate area is the size of a cubicle and is isolated from the rest of the terminal. Thankfully, that's changing within the next 6-12 months.
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Old Yesterday, 8:26 pm
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Originally Posted by terrier View Post
CBP preclearance locations do have one practical difference for US citizens: onward travel to the US is de-facto at the discretion of CBP.

A US citizen at other points of entry may be detained for secondary screening, and may have his or her belongings searched or seized, but ultimately they cannot be refused entry to the US. At a preclearance checkpoint, CBP may not be able to technically deny entry to US citizens, but they can detain them long enough to make them miss the day's flights. Lather, rinse, repeat.

This is not hypothetical; I was relatively recently coerced this way at DUB preclearance (i.e. directly threatened with being sent to secondary with the clear implication that I would not be allowed to fly) to answer questions about my employment and whether I or other members of my family hold any other nationalities - questions that I would not have to answer at a stateside checkpoint. I did not have the luxury at the time of taking a principled stand, but neither do I plan to return to the US via DUB on future trips.
That's interesting. Do you think it's possible they were bluffing and they would have let you on the plane if you had silently stood your ground?
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