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Old Dec 5, 11, 1:51 pm   #1
 
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Below Knee Amputee Airline Travel Questions

As a BK amputee, I have run into a few issues while flying. Mainly, after several hours on the plane I've learned I need to take off my leg or the pain is intolerable (kneecap feels like it's going to be sucked off my knee by the liner!). Sounds simple enough, but, I really have a hard time disclosing this to anyone sitting next to me so I just loosen the leg and "endure" the pain for modesty reasons.

Are there any other BK's amps out there and how do you deal with this when flying?

I'm ok with the manual TSA searches due to my prosthesis. Of course they need to check things thoroughly. I only had one bad experience shortly after 9/11 where they took my leg and ran it through the X-ray machine in front of everyone (left me in a chair as I didn't expect them to run off with my leg for crying out loud!). They don't do that anymore thankfully. It is a major issue to take off both my shoes (my balance is thrown off and I don't want to fall since I have Spina Bifida and don't want to risk hurting my back), so on my last 2 international flights I've said "No, I can't take them off" and TSA was fine with it and did their usual swabbing and wanding.

But my main issue is on the plane and trying to tell seat mates I need to take off my leg. The thought mortifies me. I'm now thinking of only flying business class just so I have a bit of privacy with a window seat. If I don't say anything I sure look funny trying to "click" on my leg (which makes a lot of noise too!) and might frighten folks wondering what's up! So I feel forced to say something. My system of quietly trying to do this is NOT WORKING!

Any help will be appreciated! Thanks in advance
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Old Dec 5, 11, 4:13 pm   #2
 
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Would you welcome a reply from a non-amputee?

I'm sure you've spent years working to make sure people see you as a person, not an amputee. But if your concern is with freaking people out, then from the moment you board you might want to make it a bit more apparent than normal that you have a prosthetic. (Exaggerate a limp, ask the passenger in the aisle seat to step out into the aisle when you sit down & mention--even if you're pretending--that you have a little difficulty maneuvering because you have a prosthesis, roll up your pant leg after sitting down while pretending to make an adjustment, etc.)

Granted, I live in a big city, I have friends & family with disabilities, I see people with prosthetics with some regularity. So I may not be your average person. But if you got on a plane & sat down next to me in a way that made it clear you had a prosthetic, I'd notice it at first then not give it a second thought. Particularly if you later took it off. On the other hand, if I boarded after you, you never got up or down to go to the bathroom, there was no chance for me to notice your prosthetic, I might be a little thrown once you popped it off. I'd do a pretty good job of hiding my surprise, but you might get a bit more of a reaction than I'd normally like to give. And understand--I don't want you to feel uncomfortable or as if there's something wrong with taking off your leg, so I would be embarrassed if I reacted with surprise or in any way made you uncomfortable.
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Old Dec 5, 11, 6:17 pm   #3
 
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...

Just announce you will pop it off and then do it.

I have it easy, comparatively. All things being relative I "enjoy" PWD or amputee identification on sight but the advantage is that I never have to disclose stuff as it is apparent, always. With legs, not so easy.

When I wear a prosthetic arm, security is a night mare. They never do trainings on that. They have no idea what a body powered arm is. They are absolutely clueless. Once a security guy insisted I keep my pullover on after I volunteered to take it off so he could see all the stuff. He then stood in front of me while letting his fingers follow the cable to my back and as it curves around to the other shoulder he almost hugged me by then, at the same time he was visibly nervous and trembling, probably thinking it was a bomb thingy or so. So I started to tell him that I don't need to be hugged by perverts that don't know their job and obviously he didn't exactly cheer up. As I was definitely fed up then I started my usual routine of sharp snide remarks and dry laughs and the person left the examination room a short time later. I encountered inexperienced untrained people a lot. I usually complain to the airports in writing and often later, like half a year later or so, they are a tad bit better. Still, wearing the prosthetic with parts squeezing against my back in an airplane seat and restricting my shoulder is a bit uncomfortable for over 2-3 hours. Then I will take things off, too. I just go "excuse me", take it off, if it smells which it always does I go "uh!" and put it away. The other people do their best to not freak out as the person that posted previously but I cannot cater to all of these guys needs I'm afraid. No one ever asked me to buy them a beer for compensation, so it can't be THAT bad, also everyone is a bit of a voyeur and can't take their eyeballs off. I usually make some more dry jokes like, "it's worse in summer" when it is winter, and the other way around. Just to keep them entertained while we suffer through breaking taboos and stuff we are forced to go through together.

When I travel without the prosthetic on, things are a lot better inasmuch as security is concerned. It takes me ages to put my belt back on and I take my time doing it. However with just one hand, handling the airplane food on a minimal area of action usually is too much for me technically, and, mostly, too much for my neighbour mentally. At the latest then I start back on the snide remarks and dry humor, if not for their then at least for my own entertainment. Also, I just punk my way through, and if there be sauce and meat pieces all over I shove them into the newspaper holder or under the seats. If the juice pusher asks me whether I need assistance I always answer with "No!" and when she is gone I tell my neighbor "I'm a man!! Does no one realize I will *never* answer that question truthfully?". Usually a nervous laughter is the response. Once I tried to open the peanuts. They all went on the floor of the corridor. I was, "oh well". After half an hour the fragments were so small you didn't even know there had been peanuts. Things work out by themselves, all you have to do is learn to lean back and accept fate.

But as chgoeditor posted: I never cause surprises. It's not a surprise I have a hard time getting peanuts open with one hand! When my prosthetic arm starts to hurt I will subtitle that experience. When I have to take it off the other guys are as relieved as I am. Can't be mean to others, for sure.

You know, I get pushed back sometimes, and have a hard time, but I am not bothered any more. If there is a flight I have to take - I just go and avoid any strenuous attempt of camouflage or otherwise. If I feel like it, I pop my parts on or off just as it comes in handy. I stopped catering for other people's eventualities. No one ever told me in the face they had a problem with it. We are all human and airplanes are difficult for everyone. If the person next to me has a weak bladder I am not upset or angry. We'll work it out. Other people are the same with me and my arm. It's weird and strange, some situations are funny, gory - but most of the time, we all look out for each other even if only in a limited way.

Usually when the ice breaks and I am chewing on some food after having fought the food package with my prosthetic arm on if I am wearing it, the first question will be "how do you control it?". Really, people have no idea about body powered arms. So, still chewing as that's when curiosity strikes them, I answer truthfully and by spitting a tad bit of my food back "Pure will power". And after swallowing down I might add "and cookies". I never smile or twinkle or give any cues for other people to tell if I make a joke. Also I am a real Andy Kaufman fan.

I mean, just relax and take it as it comes. You could just tell your neighbor "Don't be afraid alright? This (point to leg) thing comes apart. So do NOT freak out when I take it apart now, alright?" and not missing a beat THEN you clonk it off - simple as that.

Last edited by swisswuff; Dec 5, 11 at 6:28 pm.
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Old Dec 5, 11, 7:56 pm   #4
 
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Originally Posted by chgoeditor View Post
Would you welcome a reply from a non-amputee?

I'm sure you've spent years working to make sure people see you as a person, not an amputee. But if your concern is with freaking people out, then from the moment you board you might want to make it a bit more apparent than normal that you have a prosthetic. (Exaggerate a limp, ask the passenger in the aisle seat to step out into the aisle when you sit down & mention--even if you're pretending--that you have a little difficulty maneuvering because you have a prosthesis, roll up your pant leg after sitting down while pretending to make an adjustment, etc.)
Great advice! Your insight as a non-amputee is very helpful! I use a cane so I think I'll keep it out instead of putting it away so that can be my intro to say something before takeoff. This honestly didn't occur to me until you suggested it! Thank you!

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Originally Posted by swisswuff View Post
I mean, just relax and take it as it comes. You could just tell your neighbor "Don't be afraid alright? This (point to leg) thing comes apart. So do NOT freak out when I take it apart now, alright?" and not missing a beat THEN you clonk it off - simple as that.
I like your style using humor, thank you for your comments - humor helps as long as they speak English. I sat next to a Japanese lady flying to Japan recently. She didn't speak a word of English and I don't speak Japanese! So that was AWKWARD so I didn't say anything. I've also noticed many frequent flyers tend to be very icy when they board as they certainly don't want to get stuck next to a leisure traveler (me!) that wants to chat it up during the whole flight. So as soon as I see they don't want to make eye contact and don't say a word, I usually keep to myself. I think the key is say something at boarding because once the flights en route, there just doesn't seem to be a good time to discuss removable body parts
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Old Dec 6, 11, 5:37 am   #5
 
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As someone who has been permanently confined to a wheelchair for 37 years, and has flown domestically and internationally for 30 of those, I believe you are giving your fellow passengers far too much credit. My experience is that the average person really couldn't give a damn about most of the people they encounter in their daily lives. They are far too absorbed in their own little lives. Yes, they may notice your prosthesis, but believe me all thoughts in that regard will evaporate in an electronic puff when the next mindless SMS arrives on their mobile screen.

If you are concerned about your modesty when detaching/attaching your prosthesis imagine for a moment having to relieve yourself into a urinal on a long haul flight whilst sitting shoulder to shoulder with your fellow passengers (no, the toilets are not wheelchair accessible). I try to be as discreet as possible, dimming any lights, and throwing a blanket over myself, but for them there is little doubt as to what I'm engaged in, especially as the look of relief spreads across my face!...

In the greater scheme of things all of this is trivial. It is not that I am inconsiderate to my fellow man, but more that certain things are just not worth being concerned about. Rather spend your energy on ensuring your own comfort, enjoying the flight, and looking forward to the destination. Those people whom you are concerned about will have forgotten about you before they had even left the terminal building...
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Old Dec 6, 11, 1:16 pm   #6
 
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In the greater scheme of things all of this is trivial. It is not that I am inconsiderate to my fellow man, but more that certain things are just not worth being concerned about. Rather spend your energy on ensuring your own comfort, enjoying the flight, and looking forward to the destination. Those people whom you are concerned about will have forgotten about you before they had even left the terminal building...
I appreciate your comments and your situation certainly puts into perspective my situation! However, a big concern I have is someone will think I'm a terrorist (that's my fear) when I'm simply trying to get comfortable. A prosthetic leg is pretty big, there are socks and liners to remove, and invariably, metal clicking sounds that certainly could cause some to panic!
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Old Dec 6, 11, 5:53 pm   #7
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Welcome to FlyerTalk!

I'll second HiltonP's comments - I really don't think people are paying that much attention. If they hear a noise and look around, they'll see you're taking off your leg.

As a wheelchair athlete who trains and competes with amputee athletes, I see guys taking legs and arms off all the time, switching appliances, etc...it won't kill the clueless able-bodied public to get a little tuned in to the fact that not everybody's the same.
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Old Dec 6, 11, 6:01 pm   #8
 
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Originally Posted by DavisCalifJr View Post
I think the key is say something at boarding because once the flights en route, there just doesn't seem to be a good time to discuss removable body parts
So maybe it becomes a communication problem only because you are uncomfortable sitting, and because you have not practiced / been forced to practice to master that type of situation too often so far.

There is an art to communicating the unspeakable or dealing with reactions though - but if they indeed think you are, in fact, a terrorist I suggest you really go slow then and not do anything rash. Or, instead, rent a car and drive.

Another way of solving the problem would be to tweak a worn out liner so it will be more comfortable sitting with it and still provide at least minimal stability for rock'n'roll. I'd mill down the socket edge and really make that as smooth as possible. I'd go for a really wide older socket with a pin lock - I mean, I hang on to my own old sockets exactly for that reason, not too tight, really bad control, but great comfort. But I tweak them, I work with them, and I get my technician's help to see to it that it does what I want it to do. You could try cutting out the liner's knee cap area, for example, or see that you dilate that area using a heatgun or excessive force. I'd really play with the stuff until it feels comfortable and then I'd just leave the thing on if I was in no mind at all to draw attention. If your stump is long, cutting the liner to just cover the skin below the knee might be a solution, too. You could still swap liners after the flight to give better stability. Have you ever asked your technician to assist you with finding better sitting solutions?

The easiest way to evade all questions is to not at all wear the leg. Just use crutches. No questions will be asked then. I know people who never wear their leg on an airplane but use their wheelchair and then crutches. And they get attendants' assistance, too. And even for me, flying without prosthesis REALLY is the way to go, comfort wise.
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Old Dec 7, 11, 1:17 am   #9
 
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Originally Posted by DavisCalifJr View Post
However, a big concern I have is someone will think I'm a terrorist (that's my fear) when I'm simply trying to get comfortable. A prosthetic leg is pretty big, there are socks and liners to remove, and invariably, metal clicking sounds that certainly could cause some to panic!
You are joking, right?.....
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Old Dec 7, 11, 5:47 am   #10
 
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You are joking, right?.....
Prosthetic limbs in conjunction with ignorance, fear, heightened sense of security, and huge inability to communicate effectively as consequence of the aforementioned are a peculiar, peculiar subject indeed.

More than once I had security folks almost lose it, sweating, trembling and not the mildest bit looking at ease whilst their clam fingers inched forward along the cable of my prosthetic arm just to find out the cable was longer than their imagination ever allowed them to accept.

As I do wear what you could call a heavy duty setup that does not conform to any other standards, I wear a shoulder anchor point with steel and carbon fiber parts, some part of my cable is raw open uncovered steel cable as you'd see on a bicycle, and there are some uncovered nuts and bolts where a belt / fabric part is used to really give the whole thing stability. I mean, it took me and a few people a few years to develop all aspects of it and now it works so absolutely well, why not enjoy wearing it. Sitting against a chair's back rest however for a long time, that can be a bit uncomfortable but I have no particular problem undressing, taking the thing off, and putting my shirt back on.

But the tricky part about prosthetics is the mixture of taboo subject, camouflage and technology. If you have absolutely no idea about the subject you will never guess what crazy stuff your fingers feel once you touch my shoulder, back, sleeve. Just not. I had friends hug me and with almost a cry of surprise push me away or let go after they thought they just did something dangerous by touching a "technical" part of me.

So I usually demand airport security folks to go to a separate room and I immediately explain to them that this is something they never saw or will see and I *urge* them to inspect it, i.e., we can take clothes off, and I tell them there is enough room in my socket to smuggle liquid gold, i.e., apple juice (ever saw how much apple juice costs after security posts at airports?). They usually laugh it all off, saying they don't need me to do all that, and then they will suffer the consequences. I think it is not good that they don't take time to inspect these items thoroughly - besides we'd be over and done with so much faster.

The fear and shock reaction is definitely made worse by an initially unassuming appearance. There were times when I would wear skin colored hand gloves so the prosthetic hand would look, as you know, harmless, "fitting in". Which would set off the expectation that when my hand "wants" to "fit in" the rest of me also wants to fit in. Absolutely not, the rest of the prosthetic arm is most seriously customized. The wrist unit was developed by friends and me, the whole cable setup was re-developed by me, and the shoulder anchor point was an insurance-funded new solution for me to avoid nerve compression and allow for a full maximum loading. I can and do cut my hedges with that arm, I can move heavy stuff. Obviously for travels, handling bags and such, I will want to wear it. It's most practical indeed. Without having a *look*, which can only be done by asking me to take my shirt or pullover off, you will most likely die the death of fear, if you are exposed to this mechanism in a covered state, either as security officer or sitting on an airplane suspecting terrorism. Trying to touch these parts to make sense of them, that is like trying to feel your way through a dark cellar that is covered with tools, boxes of nails and screws, some saw blades lying around - it's just not the ideal way of exploring things. Which is what "security" in context of airplane travel should or could signify.

This can be made a lot worse if the covering of the disability is near-perfect such as with a prosthetic leg. Conversely as you can imagine, once people see from a distance that there is someone with a handicap, they will react accordingly and if anything bad happens as consequence it is NOT this: it's not a shock.

With that, I now tend to wear clear signs of this arm being massively technical. I wear non-skin colored cosmetic (!) gloves, I wear grippers or hooks, my sockets are non-skin colored but glossy carbon fiber or colored epoxy, so you are really pre-warned visually that this arm is off limits. I mean, that's why we did it like that, it makes things a lot easier.

But it is an absolute given that the fear jerk type reaction that is described as social problem here, that is absolutely real. It is (and even more was) my experience too.
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Old Dec 7, 11, 8:13 am   #11
 
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But it is an absolute given that the fear jerk type reaction that is described as social problem here, that is absolutely real.
I hear what you are saying, but if this is truly the case, where disabled people are fearful of their able-bodied fellow travellers, and able-bodied people are fearful of their disabled fellow travellers because of a perceived security threat, then we have a far larger problem than simply one's disability!.....
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Old Dec 7, 11, 8:04 pm   #12
 
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You are joking, right?.....
Nope. Not joking. This happens since I have been mistaken for being middle eastern (I'm hispanic). I'm not sure where you've been flying, but, it's a pretty interesting change I've seen flying TPAC and TATL to and from the US.. It's not that I'm paranoid, but things changed after 9/11 how people look at one another on planes. My intent wasn't to get into that debate, but, anyone doing something strange or unusual on a plane is a concern and removing body parts might alarm some folks before they realize what's going on..lol..

Fortunately, from some of the comments I've read here (thanks everyone!) I've really learned a few new tricks to put my seatmates at ease (and me too) as the goal is to have a comfortable flight without any surprises. I feel much better now that I can address this one area of flying that really has been impacting me
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Old Dec 14, 11, 7:21 pm   #13
 
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Nope. Not joking. This happens since I have been mistaken for being middle eastern (I'm hispanic). I'm not sure where you've been flying, but, it's a pretty interesting change I've seen flying TPAC and TATL to and from the US.. It's not that I'm paranoid, but things changed after 9/11 how people look at one another on planes. My intent wasn't to get into that debate, but, anyone doing something strange or unusual on a plane is a concern and removing body parts might alarm some folks before they realize what's going on..lol..

Fortunately, from some of the comments I've read here (thanks everyone!) I've really learned a few new tricks to put my seatmates at ease (and me too) as the goal is to have a comfortable flight without any surprises. I feel much better now that I can address this one area of flying that really has been impacting me
Obviously as a clearly visable caucasian female I'm in an easier position (allthough between my aids and medical equipment I could blow up many a planes and put down many passengers, but that set aside ), but in these cases it helps to kinda be................ overly overly clear.

Be overly visable in being "just an amputee". Read; don't try to be private when removing your prosthetic, but be visable! When folks can't judge a book by it's cover and know what it is (or at least know what it isn't!), you'll find they judge even if it's just out of pure fear.

And honestly? SO WHAT if they see you disconnect and connect the prosthetic as you like? Nobody should give a darn and if folks do get antsy about it; that's there problem. Never ever feel you should hide because of others or even worse; be uncomfortable just to prevent others might get a dose of real life world.

If flying BC makes you more comfortable physically and you find it's beneficial that way; by all means fly BC if you can afford it. But if it is just out of worry about others judgement; stop thinking that right now! You'ld be nuts to spent the extra money just because of others.

There are 2 groups onboard; the oblivious (which you can scratch of your list right now) and the lookers. With the latter I tend to think "let's give 'm a show!". Who cares? So they see something. It's not like you are exposing private parts or doing anything other obscene thing. You are simply taking off a prosthetic, period.

Stop overcaring about others feelings. This is not something you should be worried about. Smelling badly beyond believe, behaving like a barnyard animal, those kinda things you should be worried about. But not this. It's their problem, not yours. As far as possible false worries about safety; either be overly clear so nobody can mistake what you are doing is safe or have a short instruction talk with those directly next to you.
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Old Dec 15, 11, 12:52 am   #14
 
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Obviously as a clearly visable caucasian female I'm in an easier position (allthough between my aids and medical equipment I could blow up many a planes and put down many passengers, but that set aside ), but in these cases it helps to kinda be................ overly overly clear.

Be overly visable in being "just an amputee". Read; don't try to be private when removing your prosthetic, but be visable! When folks can't judge a book by it's cover and know what it is (or at least know what it isn't!), you'll find they judge even if it's just out of pure fear.

And honestly? SO WHAT if they see you disconnect and connect the prosthetic as you like? Nobody should give a darn and if folks do get antsy about it; that's there problem. Never ever feel you should hide because of others or even worse; be uncomfortable just to prevent others might get a dose of real life world.

If flying BC makes you more comfortable physically and you find it's beneficial that way; by all means fly BC if you can afford it. But if it is just out of worry about others judgement; stop thinking that right now! You'ld be nuts to spent the extra money just because of others.

There are 2 groups onboard; the oblivious (which you can scratch of your list right now) and the lookers. With the latter I tend to think "let's give 'm a show!". Who cares? So they see something. It's not like you are exposing private parts or doing anything other obscene thing. You are simply taking off a prosthetic, period.

Stop overcaring about others feelings. This is not something you should be worried about. Smelling badly beyond believe, behaving like a barnyard animal, those kinda things you should be worried about. But not this. It's their problem, not yours. As far as possible false worries about safety; either be overly clear so nobody can mistake what you are doing is safe or have a short instruction talk with those directly next to you.
I hear you loud and clear on this! You're very right! I'm not worried about the oblivious people..The lookers that are aware of their surroundings are the ones I was concerned about. Trying to be "discreet" only heightens their concerns as to what I'm doing fussing with my leg. Best to be upfront and say something to those closest around me. I suspect it won't be a big deal. I just need to speak up. I am a relatively new amputee so I guess these concerns are normal that I have. I've done pretty well in most surroundings, but the airplane issues have been a challenge. I have fallen a couple of times in public places, and my leg has popped off in a contorted way where it looks like I've seriously injured myself and have scared passerby's terribly before I could explain to them it's a prosthetic leg and thats why it is so out of shape! I didn't break my leg! They literally turned pale white they were so frightened (picture my leg bend behind me unnaturally and twisted sideways like a bad car wreck!). All I could do was laugh at what they must have thought before I told them! Humor goes a long way when you're an amputee

Thank you for your comments. They helped me very much!
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Old Dec 15, 11, 10:43 am   #15
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Good luck in your travels!

When my badly injured leg was at its worst (truly ugly) I started out trying to hide it under long pants, etc. Pointless. People were much more responsive giving me more room and time to get where I needed to go when they could see at least some of the injury.

Especially when trying to get down jetways to the planes and off again when folks are in a real rush.

I found much the same with the TSA.

There is no point at keeping it all a secret when one's own comfort and safety are concerned.
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