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Is the plunging u.s. dollars becoming a problem for your travelling experiences?

Is the plunging u.s. dollars becoming a problem for your travelling experiences?

Old Dec 1, 06, 6:39 pm
  #31  
 
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Wink

Not affecting me at all or my travel plans either.

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Old Dec 1, 06, 7:03 pm
  #32  
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getting ridiculous for this american

A few years ago. I could buy 1 euro for $.85 so a 5 euro Coke in a cafe cost $4.25. At todays rate for $1.33 I can buy 1 euro so a 5 euro Coke in a cafe now costs me $6.65 ouch! This makes the 28 euro hamburger at the Rome Hilton out of the question $37.24+tip At least my free award nites (seem) like a bargain, but its the exact same room I stayed in before. Time to give Europe a break
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Old Dec 1, 06, 7:23 pm
  #33  
 
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What bugs me is that it's not only the US dollar thats taking a slide. The CAN$ is sliding also, which is gonna make my trip back home to Ireland this Christmas all the more expensive
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Old Dec 1, 06, 10:09 pm
  #34  
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Originally Posted by ClueByFour View Post
The fundamentals behind the USD are currently, well, junk.
Given the size of the Dubyanomics train wreck, it's amazing the damage hasn't been a lot worse. He's both the #1 tax-cutter and #1 spender since WWII, and has had huge trade deficits on top of ruinous budget deficits. Without reserve-currency status and investor psychology, the punishment would have been meted out in full some time ago.

As for the effect on travel, I'm chronically on a low budget and have been for some time, but it's hard to sort out which places are just plain expensive vs. which can turn with exchange rates. Europe is more pleasant with a 90-cent euro than a $1.30 one, but even in the former case I don't know if it's "cheap."
Similarly, Tahiti (tied to the euro, only worse) always seems like Tokyo.

Probably the most variable places I've been in recent years are Canada and New Zealand. Both have had currencies beaten down temporarily to where they actually look good on land costs vs. the U.S., but I'd say not so anymore.

SE Asia is still a good zone, too, even with places like Thailand and the Philippines bouncing 10% or more off their recent lows. Many of those places are so export-dependent that they deliberately won't let their currency get too strong against the $ UNLESS China goes first, and China has only made very modest steps. So there hasn't been near the effect there.

Contrarians also usually have a handful of places with even more troubles than the U.S. Often someplace in South America will be in the doghouse, or Mexico, or maybe Indonesia.
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Old Dec 2, 06, 11:31 am
  #35  
 
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Originally Posted by philip_kaplan View Post
Is the plunging u.s. dollars becoming a problem for your travelling experiences?
Not a problem, because:

First, I moved my U.S. dollars out of the U.S. and into other investments.
Legal, legitimate, investments.

Then, I moved myself out of the U.S. and am living abroad.
With a proper visa and all paper-work in order.

As a result, what happens with the dollar is largely irrelevant to my traveling experiences.

Simple.

But not easy.

The U.S. dollar -- long term -- is on a slippery slope downward.
I want nothing more to do with it.

-- Peter
.

Last edited by Peter4; Dec 2, 06 at 11:38 am
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Old Dec 2, 06, 2:59 pm
  #36  
 
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Doesn't bother me since I don't usually pay for my own travel; my clients haven't howled too much, yet .
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Old Dec 2, 06, 4:22 pm
  #37  
 
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Originally Posted by majik View Post
The CAN$ is sliding also, which is gonna make my trip back home to Ireland this Christmas all the more expensive
The CAD has been up over 30%, against the USD, in the past few years. It's still up over 10%, against the EUR, from last year.
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Old Dec 3, 06, 9:48 am
  #38  
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The Bush peso, aka weaker USD, has been a mixed blessing. The USD getting closer to late 1940s and 1950s exchange rates vis-a-vis certain European currencies isn't something I invited with open arms but it's sort of something for which I had planned in the past few years; and its adjustments with such in mind that have been quite rewarding.

However, for the many, the weakening exchange rate and more US-based credit card foreign currency surcharges have been a sort of double-whammy.
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Old Dec 3, 06, 9:52 am
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Originally Posted by andrzej View Post
Why?

For the average tourist it may add up to ~$20 a day more.

If that's something that makes or breaks your budget, then I suppose you should plan on discovering the beautiful USA.

In my case it makes little difference. YMMV

Exactly....it is such a small difference that I am not going to cancel any trips based on the currency fluctuations....this is normal and one should be able to handle the samll fluctuations if you want to travel the world....
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Old Dec 3, 06, 9:55 am
  #40  
 
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Originally Posted by MeNoSay View Post
This is a dumb question. Sorry. It is. Either it costs more to buy things or it doesn't. Either you're rich enough that it doesn't matter or you're not

Here are the answers:

1) I am an American who travels overseas. But I am rich so I don't care.
2) I am an American who travels overseas. I am poor, so it hurts.
3) I am a foreigner with a strong currency who travels to the U.S. So it helps.
4) I don't travel abroad/I don't understand currency/my currency is pegged to the dollar/I have no idea what you mean


Please improve.
I guess I`ll go for-------Number 3
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Old Dec 5, 06, 8:17 am
  #41  
 
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When it comes out of my pocket, it's because I'm travelling for personal reasons i.e. vacation. While it hurts, I'm so desperate for a holiday by the time it comes around that I don't care about the pain.
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Old Dec 5, 06, 1:45 pm
  #42  
 
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Agree with RustyC

tho some comments there are possibly OT. The OP mentioned the euro, so techinically any reference to other currencies is probably tangential...
But Thailand remains a bargain even though the baht has strengthened (or the Bushdollar weakened) ~10% over the past year. I presume the HK$ is still very stable at around $1US : $7 HK
But R and I and are definitely NOT pulling our 8-plays-in-5-days hops to London any more. A) there's London prices to begin with, and B) the dollar vs pound sterling thing. >sheesh<
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Old Dec 5, 06, 1:51 pm
  #43  
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Since the very first day of the full transition to euros for retail transactions, there's been a c. 50% decline in the value of the dollar vis-a-vis the euro. I don't consider a decline in the US dollar from c. $0.88/€1.00 to c. $1.30/€1.00 to be small peanuts.
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Old Dec 5, 06, 2:07 pm
  #44  
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post
Since the very first day of the full transition to euros for retail transactions, there's been a c. 50% decline in the value of the dollar vis-a-vis the euro. I don't consider a decline in the US dollar from c. $0.88/1.00 to c. $1.30/1.00 to be small peanuts.
The Euro was quite weak at the transition time, and it's rather arbitrary to pick this date as measure for comparison. When looking at the past performance of some of the Euro's stronger components, the current $ exchange rate looks quite acceptable (we're at about DEM1.46/USD1.00).
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Old Dec 5, 06, 2:26 pm
  #45  
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Originally Posted by jpdx View Post
The Euro was quite weak at the transition time, and it's rather arbitrary to pick this date as measure for comparison. When looking at the past performance of some of the Euro's stronger components, the current $ exchange rate looks quite acceptable (we're at about DEM1.46/USD1.00).
I choose to use the € currency's launch date for retail transactions, which also happened to be the date I started using the currency for retail transactions, and its entire history as used for retail transactions principally because any other date chosen would be even more arbitrary than currency launch date when looking at it from a tourist's retail perspective. Looking at other currencies and picking random dates would seem even more arbitrary. I guess I could look at currencies from a 10-year, 20-year, 30-year, 40-year, 50-year or 60-year horizion for a dozen or two currencies, but those could be just as abritrary (or more abritrary) a comparison as anything else or on some other basis. I don't know what would be less arbitrary from most tourist's perspective.

Looking at this from the arbitrary perspective of travel since FT's launch date, the USD has taken a hit when it comes to US travellers wanting to visit the main tourist destinations in Europe today compared to FT's start date.
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