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Road Warriors - Dinner for one?

Road Warriors - Dinner for one?

Old Nov 14, 2007, 7:45 am
  #61  
 
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Originally Posted by WineIsGood
Wow, those are exactly the reasons I *like* to visit local places - part of the fun of travel is learning new ways!
That works fine unless you are a visible minority. It is not worth risking your physical well-being at places where you might not be welcome simply for "fun".

One suggestion that has not yet been made here is to ask the airline crew what their suggestions are. They tend to be quite expert on restaurants convenient to their layover hotels, especially in international cities where they tend to fly a regular schedule. And if none of them have been there before, well, you might have some company for dinner as you go exploring....
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 7:52 am
  #62  
 
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Originally Posted by HereAndThereSC
I'm actually quite surprised at the number of people that refuse the "Standard" dining chains (chili's-olivegarden-macaroni-grill-etc)...

On the other hand, I won't eat fast food. I try to eat well & balanced.JP
Those 'casual dining' chains are nothing but fast food. Given that everything on the menu in those places are covered in heavy sauces, it would not surprise me if a typical McD meal actually had fewer calories than the Fettuccine Alfredo at Olive Garden, or the Baby Back Ribs at Chili's.
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 7:57 am
  #63  
 
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Originally Posted by B747-437B
That works fine unless you are a visible minority. It is not worth risking your physical well-being at places where you might not be welcome simply for "fun".
My goodness, where have your work-related travels taken you?

I seem to always end up in very benign locations - either downtowns, or in suburban shopping areas. Neither of which present problems as to where I could or could not venture.

I would think you would have to go pretty far off the beaten path to find the types of locations where your physically well-being may be at risk.
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 8:02 am
  #64  
 
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Originally Posted by B747-437B
That works fine unless you are a visible minority. It is not worth risking your physical well-being at places where you might not be welcome simply for "fun".


I didn't say go into a sketchy neighborhood to try something new. I'm not sure how you read that in my post.

I'm suggesting it's more enriching to drive past the Chili's to the local restaurant next door. Check citysearch or restaurant websites in advance to find something good.

P.S. I'm a woman who is typically alone while traveling - I am well aware that one shouldn't risk physical well-being.
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 8:13 am
  #65  
 
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98% of my travels are work related. I don't care so much about "experiencing the local flavor" after I've worked a 10-12 hour day. That's why I stick to what works.

JP
Originally Posted by WineIsGood
Wow, those are exactly the reasons I *like* to visit local places - part of the fun of travel is learning new ways!
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 8:17 am
  #66  
 
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And that's why I never get anything with a heavy sauce I stick with tomato base.

And I'm sure the bechamel sauce is low-fat at the nice french restaurant, too.

JP

Originally Posted by pittpanther
Those 'casual dining' chains are nothing but fast food. Given that everything on the menu in those places are covered in heavy sauces, it would not surprise me if a typical McD meal actually had fewer calories than the Fettuccine Alfredo at Olive Garden, or the Baby Back Ribs at Chili's.
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 8:23 am
  #67  
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The way I see it I get enough of the chain restaurants in airports where I have no other choice. TGIF, Chili's, etc. - they are all the same, and I actually like 'em in airports because, unlike most airport food outlets, they don't double their prices just because, you know, they happen to be near a bunch of airplanes... The usual $7.95 burger might be $8.95... I'd rather have that than pay $6.95 for a cold sandwich and $2.50 for a bottle of Diet Coke at one of the other places.

So, since I get my bland American chainfood fix in airports, when I actually get to my destination, I really, really try to avoid these places.
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 8:40 am
  #68  
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Originally Posted by HereAndThereSC
And that's why I never get anything with a heavy sauce I stick with tomato base.

And I'm sure the bechamel sauce is low-fat at the nice french restaurant, too.

JP
In general, I don't mind having a really unhealthy meal if it's something I'm really enjoying eating. That could be a fine French restaurant, or it could be a Five Guys burger. Maybe I need to go run 10-12 miles the next day to burn off the calories, but hey...for a delicious meal, it's worth it.

But it would probably gnaw at me if I were doing this often at chain restaurants...
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 9:11 am
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I actually began to enjoy dining alone in restaurants when I travel--as soon as I realized that no one was staring at me and whispering "look at that guy sitting there alone--is he some kind of loser, or what?".....

I usually eat at the bar but will choose to sit at a table if that appears to be a better option. I go early, around 6 or 6:30 and just walk in. I have found, though, that I often have to "manipulate" the server to avoid being rushed. I'll order a drink, then an appetizer or a salad, then an entree after I've finished the first course. Otherwise, it seems that I'll get the whole thing served and consumed, with check presented, in under an hour, which is faster than I'd like. I'm not looking to spend the evening, but I do enjoy a leisurely meal.
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 9:36 am
  #70  
 
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Originally Posted by pittpanther
My goodness, where have your work-related travels taken you?
All of my travel is international and about half of that is in Africa, so perhaps my point-of-view may be slightly different than the routine US domestic road warrior.
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 3:14 pm
  #71  
 
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Another option that a lot of the previous restaurants have (ie. Outback, Chili's, Applebee's) is on-line or phone-in "to-go" ordering.
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 8:48 pm
  #72  
 
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Originally Posted by djk7
My eating strategies on the road are a bit different than most. In the interest of avoiding overly large portion sizes, and wasting too much time with meals, I usually don't go to full service restaurants, hotel restaurants, or use room service. I agree with previous posters that bringing reading material makes for a better dining experience. I have no issue asking for a table for one when on the occasion where I do eat at a restaurant.

I often go to counter service places like Panera, Chipotle, and such, but rarely do fast food. Many upscale supermarkets, such as Whole Foods and Wegmans have good soup and salad bars, and I also take advantage of those regularly. And since my family is not into sushi, I get my fix of that when traveling.
I agree with you except on the fast food part. Due to some past health problems, I cannot eat fast (read junk) food at home -- my wife would kill me. However, when on the road three or four times a month I love to be bad and eat a Whopper or other junk food on occasion. I admit it is very bad for me but I have to rebel a little.
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Old Nov 14, 2007, 9:04 pm
  #73  
 
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No votes for club lounges/

In other threads, there have been many positive comments about "dinner" in the club lounge.

Count me in this school. Portion control is a given and often the selection will include some healthy choices. Probably it would be best to not return for the cookie/brownie/cheesecake in the late evening.

The staff get to know me quickly and many of the other guests will happily let you join their groups of bored folks that have been there too long.

No local color in the lounge, but good tips about where to go out. Not to say the airline crew suggestion doesn't top that list
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Old Nov 15, 2007, 1:57 am
  #74  
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This might be interesting to some...

http://www.usatoday.com/travel/colum...ossman16_x.htm
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Old Nov 15, 2007, 7:40 am
  #75  
 
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General Rules:

The Only meal to eat at a hotel is breakfast.

Just say no to chains.

The concierge is your friend and always deserves at least a $10 tip for a good restaurant recommendation

When someone comes to your office from out of town, always invite them to dinner so they don't spend the evening alone at their hotel.

Never room service.

Hotel bars are for cocktails only ...unless you are single and looking (or are in Las Vegas where what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas )

Exceptions

No PF Changs in my hometown so it's not a "chain" and their "bar" is more like a counter for food than drinking bar.

Hooters

5 star hotels, especially in Europe

Room service when hungover

$10 is not nearly enough for a concierge at a hotel you visit more than 3 times a year.
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