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Underseat Power Outlet - Plug That Doesn't Fall Out?

Underseat Power Outlet - Plug That Doesn't Fall Out?

Old Sep 27, 2022, 1:48 pm
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Underseat Power Outlet - Plug That Doesn't Fall Out?

Curious if anyone has had success at finding a phone charger plug that doesn't fall out of the outlets between the seats on airplanes? I'm inclined to try a regular three-prong extension cord, or make one up myself, if there aren't already solutions out there. I find it's stupid-looking and probably annoying for the person next to me when I plug in and then have to hold the plug in place. Thanks!
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Old Sep 27, 2022, 2:00 pm
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THe best workaround I've heard of is that people use a British plug adaptor, since the British connectors in the outlet aren't worn out from overuse and still grip the prongs.
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Old Sep 27, 2022, 2:14 pm
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Originally Posted by gfunkdave
THe best workaround I've heard of is that people use a British plug adaptor, since the British connectors in the outlet aren't worn out from overuse and still grip the prongs.
Good idea! I'll check mine when I get home and see if my power outlet fits tightly.
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Old Sep 27, 2022, 3:23 pm
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How about just bending your prongs inward slightly? I find that usually does the trick by forcing them to lightly clamp the outlet.
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Old Sep 27, 2022, 6:28 pm
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Either the UK outlet trick,

Or i use this (where i can bend the plug as mentioned above), and helps if the plug is in a slightly awkward slit

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Old Sep 27, 2022, 7:20 pm
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There's an old thread around this sub for the same thing. I use a power bar as the weight of the plug is what usually causes the plug to fall out. But others have suggested a fitting that should work as well... (sorry, posting amazon links from my phone sucks... In case the link doesn't work, google "socket saver" or "snug plug"). Bending the pins works as well, but could cause problems for you in the future.

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Old Sep 27, 2022, 11:07 pm
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Originally Posted by gfunkdave
THe best workaround I've heard of is that people use a British plug adaptor, since the British connectors in the outlet aren't worn out from overuse and still grip the prongs.
This is the best way to go. If you're flying mostly in North America, a Continental (or any other round-pronged) adapter will usually work just as well and takes up way less space in your bag. The lighter your brick the better.
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Old Sep 28, 2022, 2:28 am
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Originally Posted by FliesWay2Much
Curious if anyone has had success at finding a phone charger plug that doesn't fall out of the outlets between the seats on airplanes? I'm inclined to try a regular three-prong extension cord, or make one up myself, if there aren't already solutions out there. I find it's stupid-looking and probably annoying for the person next to me when I plug in and then have to hold the plug in place. Thanks!
Originally Posted by der_saeufer
This is the best way to go. If you're flying mostly in North America, a Continental (or any other round-pronged) adapter will usually work just as well and takes up way less space in your bag. The lighter your brick the better.
​​​​​​​Do you have a picture of such an adapter?

Originally Posted by gfunkdave
THe best workaround I've heard of is that people use a British plug adaptor, since the British connectors in the outlet aren't worn out from overuse and still grip the prongs.
Interesting idea. What's the smallest UK adapter that I can buy? Will it fit the power outlets on American carriers like UA and DL?
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Old Sep 28, 2022, 4:07 am
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Originally Posted by lsquare
​​​​​​​Do you have a picture of such an adapter?
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appear identical to the ones I use. Avoid any 2-pin "Europe" adapters without the half-insulated plugs: if they can't bother to get that right they probably haven't done much else right.

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Some variation of this is the smallest UK adapter you can get. The UK plug itself is huge, and there's no such thing as a 2-pin version. The ground pin is required to open the shutter on the other two pins, so even ungrounded things like phone chargers have a plastic ground pin.

There used to be a two-pin outlet that took only US and European plugs on some planes, but I haven't seen one in years even on U.S. domestic flights--it appears everyone has gone to the universal outlet.
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Last edited by der_saeufer; Sep 28, 2022 at 4:21 am
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Old Sep 28, 2022, 4:56 am
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Originally Posted by der_saeufer
https://www.amazon.com/Unidapt-Europ.../dp/B077WJYNQ5 appear identical to the ones I use. Avoid any 2-pin "Europe" adapters without the half-insulated plugs: if they can't bother to get that right they probably haven't done much else right.

https://www.amazon.com/BESTEK-Ground.../dp/B00RBFK5AC Some variation of this is the smallest UK adapter you can get. The UK plug itself is huge, and there's no such thing as a 2-pin version. The ground pin is required to open the shutter on the other two pins, so even ungrounded things like phone chargers have a plastic ground pin.

There used to be a two-pin outlet that took only US and European plugs on some planes, but I haven't seen one in years even on U.S. domestic flights--it appears everyone has gone to the universal outlet.
I'm slightly confused. Are you saying the European plug is better and smaller than the UK plug? Yes, the UK is huge, but I've always had the impression that it was the most secure. The EU plug is pretty good too as it goes deep into the wall. Why is half-insulated important? Would you say that most carriers including American, Asian, and European fleets of B787s and A350s outlets accept EU and UK plugs?

Thx!
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Old Sep 28, 2022, 5:25 am
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Almost every airplane uses an international plug designed to take at least types A,B,C,E,F, G, and I. Indian (D), South African (M & N) may be a problem. Some of the three pin European plugs will have a problem with their ground pin, but the two-prong versions used with most electronics will work fine.
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Old Sep 28, 2022, 5:32 am
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Originally Posted by Dubai Stu
Almost every airplane uses an international plug designed to take at least types A,B,C,E,F, G, and I. Indian (D), South African (M & N) may be a problem. Some of the three pin European plugs will have a problem with their ground pin, but the two-prong versions used with most electronics will work fine.
Thank you!
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Old Sep 28, 2022, 5:44 am
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Originally Posted by lsquare
I'm slightly confused. Are you saying the European plug is better and smaller than the UK plug? Yes, the UK is huge, but I've always had the impression that it was the most secure. The EU plug is pretty good too as it goes deep into the wall. Why is half-insulated important? Would you say that most carriers including American, Asian, and European fleets of B787s and A350s outlets accept EU and UK plugs?
The UK plug is more secure from falling out, but the smallest UK plug adapter available is literally bigger than my charger. You can usually get away with a European plug, and that adapter takes up way less space in your bag.

The half-insulated pins are required by the standard in Europe to make it harder to shock yourself when plugging it in. In and of itself that doesn't mean anything for aircraft use but adapters that skip that detail are usually very poorly made--and they tend to have shorter pins that don't stay in the outlet as well.
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Old Oct 1, 2022, 1:19 pm
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My flight from OGG to LAX last night was on a fairly new 737 MAX. The outlets were brand new and I had no problems with the plug staying in place. When I got home this morning, I tried my three UK adapter plugs. I picked the one that had the tightest fit for the charger plug and went with that one. I'm on the road again in late October. I'll take the British plug with me, see what happens, and report my results in the thread.
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Old Oct 1, 2022, 4:47 pm
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I just use a Type C plug adapter (EU) and plug my charger into it. You can buy multi-packs of Type C adapters on Amazon for under US$10:
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