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Compact, Reliable Transformers

Compact, Reliable Transformers

Old Jan 8, 18, 9:59 am
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Compact, Reliable Transformers

Is there a particular make and model of a small, single-plug voltage transformer that anyone would recommend? We need to take US 110/120V and step it down to Japan 100V to run some kitchen appliances.
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Old Jan 8, 18, 12:01 pm
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I'd assume that just about all such transformers are made in China with the same basic design and commodity parts.

WHat wattage are you looking at?
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Old Jan 8, 18, 2:28 pm
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Originally Posted by gfunkdave View Post
I'd assume that just about all such transformers are made in China with the same basic design and commodity parts.

WHat wattage are you looking at?
Watts, I am not sure - I just need to step down USA household current to match Japan household current.
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Old Jan 8, 18, 3:53 pm
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Originally Posted by bocastephen View Post
Watts, I am not sure - I just need to step down USA household current to match Japan household current.
In this use case you will need a transformer that can handle the wattage of the appliance you're plugging into it. Overloading a transformer will just burn it out and require a new one.

Look at the appliance label where it shows things like the model number. There will be a wattage rating. What is the appliance?
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Old Jan 8, 18, 4:48 pm
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Originally Posted by bocastephen View Post
Is there a particular make and model of a small, single-plug voltage transformer that anyone would recommend? We need to take US 110/120V and step it down to Japan 100V to run some kitchen appliances.
Originally Posted by bocastephen View Post
Watts, I am not sure - I just need to step down USA household current to match Japan household current.
For Japan you also need to consider the frequency:- 50hz or 60Hz. Depends on the area
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_...ity_by_country
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electr...ector_in_Japan

How long will you be in Japan?
Plugs will be different
What type of appliances?
Probably better just to buy new appliances
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Old Jan 8, 18, 9:39 pm
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Originally Posted by Mwenenzi View Post
For Japan you also need to consider the frequency:- 50hz or 60Hz. Depends on the area
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_...ity_by_country
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electr...ector_in_Japan

How long will you be in Japan?
Plugs will be different
What type of appliances?
Probably better just to buy new appliances
No, this is the opposite - I am bringing Japanese kitchen appliances back to use in the USA.

The unit is the Hitachi XV100BKM, but I am not certain of the electrical specifications
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Old Jan 8, 18, 10:21 pm
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Originally Posted by bocastephen View Post
No, this is the opposite - I am bringing Japanese kitchen appliances back to use in the USA.

The unit is the Hitachi XV100BKM, but I am not certain of the electrical specifications
OK. Is it worth the hassle?
You need the full electrical specifications. Voltage frequency power

https://global.rakuten.com/en/store/.../item/2311753/
power consumption (cooking time): 155. 9Wh / times
● power consumption (during heating): 17. 21Wh/h
● power consumption (time of booking): 0... 78Wh/h
● power consumption (standby): 0... 69Wh/h
Wh/h means nothing to me. 1.559kW maybe
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Old Jan 9, 18, 8:33 am
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Originally Posted by Mwenenzi View Post
OK. Is it worth the hassle?
You need the full electrical specifications. Voltage frequency power

https://global.rakuten.com/en/store/.../item/2311753/

Wh/h means nothing to me. 1.559kW maybe
A Wh/h is a Watt-hour per hour, or a Watt. 155.9W seems like a very low power draw for a rice cooker, so I don't think I believe these numbers.

@bocastephen, please just look at the specs label on the rice cooker and report back its wattage rating (or volts and amps, if it doesn't show watts).
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Old Jan 9, 18, 11:55 am
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It's quite likely this rice cooker will work fine on American 120V/60Hz power. The higher voltage is probably well within its heating element's tolerance, and the electronics may well run on a power supply that doesn't care about the voltage or frequency.

It's your call whether you're willing to take the chance of plugging it in to find out.
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Old Jan 9, 18, 7:16 pm
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Originally Posted by ajGoes View Post
It's quite likely this rice cooker will work fine on American 120V/60Hz power. The higher voltage is probably well within its heating element's tolerance, and the electronics may well run on a power supply that doesn't care about the voltage or frequency..
And the electronics may well cook if it does not like the power input.
It is not unusual for a manufacturer to have small technical product variations for different markets.
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Old Jan 9, 18, 11:50 pm
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Originally Posted by Mwenenzi View Post
OK. Is it worth the hassle?
You need the full electrical specifications. Voltage frequency power

https://global.rakuten.com/en/store/.../item/2311753/

Wh/h means nothing to me. 1.559kW maybe
Yeah, those units don't make any sense to me.

However, I had more luck with an image search--I found part of the panel, it said 1400W.

If your rice cooker won't accept US power, leave it. A transformer that can handle 1,400W is big, heavy and probably not too much cheaper than the rice cooker itself.
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Old Jan 9, 18, 11:54 pm
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Originally Posted by ajGoes View Post
It's quite likely this rice cooker will work fine on American 120V/60Hz power. The higher voltage is probably well within its heating element's tolerance, and the electronics may well run on a power supply that doesn't care about the voltage or frequency.

It's your call whether you're willing to take the chance of plugging it in to find out.
Heating elements generally don't have much tolerance. The problem is that the heat they produce goes up at the square of voltage. Going from Japanese 100V power to American 120V power means the heating element produces 44% more heat. I found an image of the back panel that says 1,400W. Even if the heating element can take it a standard US outlet is only rated for 15A--this would draw 16.8A.
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Old Jan 9, 18, 11:58 pm
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Originally Posted by Loren Pechtel View Post
Yeah, those units don't make any sense to me.

However, I had more luck with an image search--I found part of the panel, it said 1400W.f.
Me neither. (I am a Mechanical Engineer) But my "convert.com" program, under energy tab, does have 1 watt-hour = 3.6 kilojoules. A kW is kJ/sec . And [Wxh]/h=W (Dimensional analysis)
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Old Jan 10, 18, 8:31 am
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Originally Posted by Loren Pechtel View Post
Heating elements generally don't have much tolerance. The problem is that the heat they produce goes up at the square of voltage. Going from Japanese 100V power to American 120V power means the heating element produces 44% more heat. I found an image of the back panel that says 1,400W. Even if the heating element can take it a standard US outlet is only rated for 15A--this would draw 16.8A.
No, the voltage is still 120 V. 1400 W/ 120V = 11.6 A.
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Old Jan 10, 18, 9:37 am
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Originally Posted by Loren Pechtel View Post
Heating elements generally don't have much tolerance.
A friend who is an electrical engineer got tired of waiting for his toast in the morning, so he plugged his toaster into an autotransformer and boosted the voltage to 160 volts. Toasting time dropped from a leisurely seven minutes to two and a half. As far as I know, the toaster has survived the experience so far - though it's only been running in turbo mode for a few months. He told me that the nichrome wire used in heating elements generally has a pretty high tolerance.
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