Interior Photos

Old Feb 2, 16, 11:04 pm
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Programs: Marriott Bonvoy Titanium
Posts: 435
Interior Photos

Hi all,

I was wondering if you had tips on shooting interior spaces, particularly hotel rooms? I like to take photos of the room for trip reports, but I typically find it challenging with dim lighting, and of course the lighting difference btw the interior of the room and the window or balcony. Any tips would be greatly appreciated; thanks!
svo242 is offline  
Old Feb 2, 16, 11:45 pm
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Central California
Programs: Former UA Premex, now dirt
Posts: 6,469
For that situation, you need a flash or a tripod for best results. With flash, you can handhold but the view out the window will not be very good. At night it will go dark. I suggest bouncing the flash off the ceiling or a wall. Without flash, set up your tripod, meter the exposure on an interior wall away from the window and set the self timer for 2 seconds to eliminate camera shake when you trip the shutter. This works best if you are in manual mode or can lock the exposure and then re-compose the image.

If you are trying this with a pocket type camera that doesn't have those options, the best you can do is turn on all the lights you can and brace the camera against a wall or door, something solid to give as much steadiness as you can get. I'd still meter an interior wall, press the shutter down halfway and recompose before firing the shutter. This is much more difficult to get good results than using a full-featured camera.
abmj-jr is offline  
Old Feb 2, 16, 11:50 pm
  #3  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Singapore
Posts: 4
You should use DSLR Camera with best lenses. Or you can use external light for better quality of image.
kiarajohnson is offline  
Old Feb 3, 16, 5:51 am
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: K+K
Programs: *G
Posts: 4,313
Originally Posted by abmj-jr View Post
If you are trying this with a pocket type camera that doesn't have those options, the best you can do is turn on all the lights you can and brace the camera against a wall or door, something solid to give as much steadiness as you can get. I'd still meter an interior wall, press the shutter down halfway and recompose before firing the shutter. This is much more difficult to get good results than using a full-featured camera.
Brace the camera against something solid. Use a 2-second self timer to ward off shake induced from pressing the shutter. Use the translucent curtain to soften some of that light and balance with the interior lights. Some cameras may have a built in (JPEG) "HDR" mode that will also help.
deniah is offline  
Old Feb 3, 16, 8:32 am
  #5  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Pittsburgh
Programs: MR/SPG LT PLT, AA LT PLT, HH GLD, UA SLV, Avis PreferredPlus
Posts: 25,160
Ideally you have a DSLR, wide-angle lenses, and a tripod, with the ability to stitch shots together in a panorama in post processing. Short of that, you're going to be challenged.

You need a stable platform and light collecting ability, and can only capture what your lens allows.

Find an object, or move an object (dresser, ironing board) to where you want to take the shot, put the camera on a timer, set for a low ISO, and allow for a long exposure. High ISO will make a grainy photo, and a flash just looks, well, flash-y. If you have a stable platform, the exposure duration won't matter.

If you can contol metering, meter for the average/darker components of the room. Blowing out a window doesn't matter - there's nothing there. You don't want a perfectly exposed window and a dark/black room.

Most important of all - as with any photography - is thinking about what is in the frame and what you are trying to capture. A technically perfect picture of a wall isn't very informative. Compare these to see which gives a better sense of this hotel:



CPRich is offline  
Old Feb 3, 16, 10:33 am
  #6  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,915
I think all you need is a newer camera or smartphone. I have a LG G4 and I never use the flash for indoor picture. The pictures it took has more light my eyes could see. And it has manual shutter speed and with that, I have taken pic in almost complete darkness. I use a selfie stick as a tripod if shutter speed is longer than a second or 2.
Need is online now  
Old Feb 3, 16, 3:40 pm
  #7  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Programs: Marriott Bonvoy Titanium
Posts: 435
Thanks for the tips. In the past, I have used in camera HDR on my Sony RX100 with some post processing in lightroom (see some example results below). I'll also be bringing a Canon 70D this year, probably with the 18-135mm kit lens as that's the widest I have at the moment. I'm still not extremely advanced with it, but hopefully I can utilize its features to help with exposure issues.


svo242 is offline  
Old Feb 3, 16, 7:47 pm
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: DCA/IAD
Programs: IHG, SPG, Hyatt, AS, AC, BA, AA, VS
Posts: 3,207
wide angle lens

shoot in daylight if possible

use HDR as mentioned to equalize the interior and exterior lighting differences

but those examples you posted are not bad. You just need a wider angle lens or shoot multiple shots and stitch them in software
glennaa11 is offline  
Old Feb 4, 16, 9:54 am
  #9  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Pittsburgh
Programs: MR/SPG LT PLT, AA LT PLT, HH GLD, UA SLV, Avis PreferredPlus
Posts: 25,160
If you need more than 18mm, take 2 or 3 overlapping shots in portrait format - stitching them into a single landscape-ish photo is relatively easy in Lightroom. You can replicate a 10mm lens fairly easily.
CPRich is offline  
Old Feb 8, 16, 4:15 pm
  #10  
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 4,709
Wide angle lens, but not too wide. Shoot around sunset if possible with the lights on. Camera goes on the tripod, and tripod goes in a corner.
TOMFORD is offline  
Old Feb 13, 16, 12:35 pm
  #11  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: HEL
Programs: lots of shiny metal cards
Posts: 8,521
Just a quick example of what you might expect from 11mm lens (f2.8, 1/15s, ISO400) With such a wide lens 1/15s is managable without a tripod Shot in the Grand Hyatt Kuala Lumpur
Attached Images  
WilcoRoger is offline  
Old Feb 17, 16, 11:28 am
  #12  
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 6
Good))
Lion88 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread