Las Fallas Valencia

Old Jan 21, 20, 5:01 pm
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Las Fallas Valencia

Any recommendations for visiting Las Fallas in Valencia? Iím going to be in Spain that week on vacation after running the Barcelona Marathon, and am thinking of going for a couple of days.
Must-Dos? Must-Avoids? Things to know?
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Old Jan 23, 20, 3:23 am
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Hello, I've been in Valencia during fallas and I should say that it is absolutely recommended. I love the atmosphere where everybody was outside together admiring the fallas, this paper escultures than later they burn...it is incredible, if you are in Spain, go to Valencia in Fallas it is one of the big festivities in the country.
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Old Jan 23, 20, 3:31 am
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Originally Posted by cornie_z View Post
Hello, I've been in Valencia during fallas and I should say that it is absolutely recommended. I love the atmosphere where everybody was outside together admiring the fallas, this paper escultures than later they burn...it is incredible, if you are in Spain, go to Valencia in Fallas it is one of the big festivities in the country.
Thanks for the feedback and recommendation!
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Old Jan 23, 20, 4:24 pm
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Originally Posted by spainlover View Post
Any recommendations for visiting Las Fallas in Valencia? I’m going to be in Spain that week on vacation after running the Barcelona Marathon, and am thinking of going for a couple of days.
Must-Dos? Must-Avoids? Things to know?
The actual fallas (la cremŗ - when they are burned) is only on the 19th March (into the early hours of the morning of the 20th) - St Joseph’s day.

when you say you are going for “a couple of days” - is that date included?

Only went to the fallas once, decades ago, and had such a great time that I don’t really remember it. What I am extremely familiar with is the Hogueras/Fogueres in Alicante which climaxes on June 24th (St John) and involves better weather. They’re not that different.

Mascletas are huge explosion rallies (think of a sonic domino track with flourishes and surprises). There are rather more limits on decibels than there used to be, but there is usually a short intense burst where they can blast the guidelines. To fully appreciate a mascleta you need to be close so that it ripples through your abdomen, rattles your jaws and slams your skull. When the choreography works it is a furious emotional assault that leaves you elated. Not all mascletas are equal, quite a few are lacklustre. But when you’re present for a masterpiece it really is something else - it’s an Art form that can only be appreciated live. If a standout example happens but you’re standing too far away from it, you won’t even realise what it was you missed out on. Position is key, which is why you’ll see concentrated crowds - join them!

As for the fallas themselves - well, they’re not paper, goodness knows what plastics are used nowadays. If you haven’t got asthma or respiratory issues, great!
Don’t wear anything fancy, if you don’t want to show your countours or nipples dress accordingly, if you go out this night you are likely to get wet. The fallas give off intense heat and the bomberos (firefighters) will protect/relieve you with their hoses. There are only so many fallas that the fire department can attend to at a time, so once one has finished, join a group of local youths and go running to the next one. Often it’s the smaller, less celebrated fallas that are most fun. A few of the bigger/most lauded fallas get featured in the main timetable. Oh yes, wear running shoes that will survive water and ash. Your phone and money needs to be water tight and (along with keys) pickpocket proof.
Be patient. Timetable or not, there is no fire until the bomberos say so - they are the gods of the night. Enjoy the anticipation, have a drink, chat to people.

There are also parades - you’ll see millions lavished on dresses, hair couture and flowers. The cost of each dress is the equivalent of buying a motorbike, or a small car. Compliments for those walking to and from the processions in regional costumes will be much appreciated (the word you want is “°Guapa!”)

There will be more going on than shown here, but this is a basic program (“Offering” means procession and lots of closed roads and routes - not a great time to get a taxi!)
https://www.visitvalencia.com/en/eve...s-program-2020

Have fun!

Last edited by LapLap; Jan 23, 20 at 4:40 pm
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Old Jan 23, 20, 7:49 pm
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Originally Posted by LapLap View Post
The actual fallas (la cremŗ - when they are burned) is only on the 19th March (into the early hours of the morning of the 20th) - St Josephís day.

when you say you are going for ďa couple of daysĒ - is that date included?

Only went to the fallas once, decades ago, and had such a great time that I donít really remember it. What I am extremely familiar with is the Hogueras/Fogueres in Alicante which climaxes on June 24th (St John) and involves better weather. Theyíre not that different.

Mascletas are huge explosion rallies (think of a sonic domino track with flourishes and surprises). There are rather more limits on decibels than there used to be, but there is usually a short intense burst where they can blast the guidelines. To fully appreciate a mascleta you need to be close so that it ripples through your abdomen, rattles your jaws and slams your skull. When the choreography works it is a furious emotional assault that leaves you elated. Not all mascletas are equal, quite a few are lacklustre. But when youíre present for a masterpiece it really is something else - itís an Art form that can only be appreciated live. If a standout example happens but youíre standing too far away from it, you wonít even realise what it was you missed out on. Position is key, which is why youíll see concentrated crowds - join them!

As for the fallas themselves - well, theyíre not paper, goodness knows what plastics are used nowadays. If you havenít got asthma or respiratory issues, great!
Donít wear anything fancy, if you donít want to show your countours or nipples dress accordingly, if you go out this night you are likely to get wet. The fallas give off intense heat and the bomberos (firefighters) will protect/relieve you with their hoses. There are only so many fallas that the fire department can attend to at a time, so once one has finished, join a group of local youths and go running to the next one. Often itís the smaller, less celebrated fallas that are most fun. A few of the bigger/most lauded fallas get featured in the main timetable. Oh yes, wear running shoes that will survive water and ash. Your phone and money needs to be water tight and (along with keys) pickpocket proof.
Be patient. Timetable or not, there is no fire until the bomberos say so - they are the gods of the night. Enjoy the anticipation, have a drink, chat to people.

There are also parades - youíll see millions lavished on dresses, hair couture and flowers. The cost of each dress is the equivalent of buying a motorbike, or a small car. Compliments for those walking to and from the processions in regional costumes will be much appreciated (the word you want is ď°Guapa!Ē)

There will be more going on than shown here, but this is a basic program (ďOfferingĒ means procession and lots of closed roads and routes - not a great time to get a taxi!)
https://www.visitvalencia.com/en/eve...s-program-2020

Have fun!
Thanks very much for the personal experiences! I know thereís only fire the last night, but they have the 15th-19th listed as the main days (yes, I know just La Crema the last night) - I might be able to stay until am of 20th but otherwise would miss the last night. Still think it would be fun.
Iíve been to several of Spainís biggest festivals, including Semana Santa in Sevilla and San Fermines, as Iíve lived in Spain before, but never made it to this one ...
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Old Jan 24, 20, 12:15 am
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Originally Posted by spainlover View Post
Thanks very much for the personal experiences! I know there’s only fire the last night, but they have the 15th-19th listed as the main days (yes, I know just La Crema the last night) - I might be able to stay until am of 20th but otherwise would miss the last night. Still think it would be fun.
I’ve been to several of Spain’s biggest festivals, including Semana Santa in Sevilla and San Fermines, as I’ve lived in Spain before, but never made it to this one ...
If you are going to go tour the different fallas to take photographs, don’t leave it too late as they wrap the fallas up with more and more fireworks leading up to the 19th. These unleashed fireworks aren’t always particularly photogenic. And also wind and rain can claim a casualty (the structures are paid for by each neighbourhood association and they rely on the lucrative prizes to help ease the financial burden, an accident/collapse can make them ineligible for a prize placement. It’s a high stakes event!)
You’ll still have the mascletas to go to (go to the front or don’t bother, if you skulk in the outskirts, don’t kid yourself that you’ve experienced a mascleta!) and the fireworks at the Turia park. If you’re really (un)lucky you’ll experience a despertŠ (gunpowder crackers and a brass band as an alarm clock) so don’t count on a lie in in the mornings!
Enjoy the processions, they are a big deal for all involved, but there will be other events too. Although quite a few will be closed off and invite only - the neighbours have been paying for these all year (many making considerable contributions) these are the pay off days. Outsiders are welcome, but not to everything!
Watch out at the open air barracas, they look like a charming way to experience street food, but the prices (at those that admit or serve visitors) can be eye watering. Check and check the price again before you buy anything. Even the price of churros can become sky high.
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Old Jan 24, 20, 12:31 am
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These are of the Alicante hogueras but they give you an idea of the detail in the Fallas, and why they are worth touring, and how the structures can be vulnerable to weather, which is why you should do it sooner rather than later (they should be at their best on the 16th).
The last photo is of my kid with her cousin... we had a great year! (Since sheís in school in June we donít get the opportunity to go any more - itís not the same dipping in as living through it)


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Old Mar 10, 20, 6:01 pm
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As mentioned in the Covid-19 thread, this evening the announcement was made that thIs years Fallas festival will be suspended until an as yet undecided date.
This is the first time this festival has been prevented from taking place since the Civil War.

English language link:
https://www.theolivepress.es/spain-n...rism-industry/
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