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Food service domestic,permission needed to fly to Sydney

Food service domestic,permission needed to fly to Sydney

Old May 13, 20, 6:52 am
  #1  
twr
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Food service domestic,permission needed to fly to Sydney

Hi there

I am asking on behalf of a friend who is flying out his family from PER-SYD-HK (i dont reside in Australia so im not to sure what the rules are, I have searched Qantas website but couldn't find :

1 Does one need a permit/permission to fly from Perth-Sydney?
2. Is Qantas offering any food on the above domestic flight?

Many thanks
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Old May 13, 20, 7:50 am
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I was in the terminal but did not fly

Hi,

There is no permit required to fly PER-SYD. NSW is still open.
I was in the terminal last week and there was a sign at the 1 open Cafe saying "No food on the flight. Last chance here". Don't know if it was a marketing ploy or actually true.
the day I was there the SYD flight left at 13.20 so there would have been time to get an early lunch before heading to the airport.
Cheers
FF
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Old May 13, 20, 7:52 am
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I thought there was a restriction on Australian nationals leaving the country. Is OP's friend an Australian citizen to whom this would presumably apply?
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Old May 13, 20, 7:54 am
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Food and beverage services

We’re making some temporary changes to our inflight service by adjusting food and beverage services on flights. We'll no longer be serving meals on domestic or regional flights. Additionally, special meals will not be available for both international and domestic services.


https://www.qantas.com/de/en/travel-...o-lounges.html
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Old May 13, 20, 8:00 am
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Originally Posted by LondonElite View Post
I thought there was a restriction on Australian nationals leaving the country. Is OP's friend an Australian citizen to whom this would presumably apply?
They were on a student VISA
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Old May 13, 20, 8:02 am
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Originally Posted by FlossieFlyer View Post
Hi,

There is no permit required to fly PER-SYD. NSW is still open.
I was in the terminal last week and there was a sign at the 1 open Cafe saying "No food on the flight. Last chance here". Don't know if it was a marketing ploy or actually true.
the day I was there the SYD flight left at 13.20 so there would have been time to get an early lunch before heading to the airport.
Cheers
FF
Thank you for the reply
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Old May 13, 20, 8:08 am
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Originally Posted by twr View Post
Hi there

.... 1 Does one need a permit/permission to fly from Perth-Sydney?
2. Is Qantas offering any food on the above domestic flight? ....
There is currently a ban on all overseas travel from Australia, with few exceptions.

No meals (or inflight entertainment) are being provided (just water) on Australian domestic flights at this time. Its BYO food, currently.

It may be an idea to check current information on international travel via this link:

https://www.health.gov.au/news/healt...for-travellers
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Old May 13, 20, 3:52 pm
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mispost
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Old May 13, 20, 6:50 pm
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I was on that flight earlier this week. We received a small bottle of water and small snack - definitely nothing replacing a meal. I would make sure to bring enough food, while there are options in the terminal in Sydney the wait can be long after a flight has arrived and everyone is waiting for the same connection.

As mentioned no WiFi or entertainment, also keep in mind that any bags will have to be picked up landside in the domestic terminal in SYD and re-checked at the international terminal.
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Old May 13, 20, 9:04 pm
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Originally Posted by DC9 View Post
There is currently a ban on all overseas travel from Australia, with few exceptions.
To be a little more subtle, there is no ban on "all" overseas travel from Australia, as such. There is a ban on Australian residents (i.e. those who normally reside in Australia regardless of nationality) traveling overseas, unless they meet some specific exceptions.

So foreigners, for example, on student visa, who normally live in Australia, would not be permitted to leave Australia, unless, I assume their visa is close to expiry and they are returning permanently overseas.

However, conversely, Australians who normally do live overseas can come and go as they please, subject to restrictions in travelling from their home countries, provided they can deal with 14 day isolation requirements when they arrive in Australia, and potentially when they return to their normal country of residence overseas as well.

Last edited by lokijuh; May 13, 20 at 9:11 pm
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Old May 13, 20, 9:18 pm
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Would someone on a student visa be considered a resident for this purpose?

OTOH, if someone is a continuing student in a country other than where e person is a citizen, IMO it would definitely be wise to stay in the country where the person is studying. Returning home even if one has a multiple entry student visa constitutes an enormous risk in the current situation.
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Old May 13, 20, 9:19 pm
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Originally Posted by lokijuh View Post
So foreigners, for example, on student visa, who normally live in Australia, would not be permitted to leave Australia, unless, I assume their visa is close to expiry and they are returning permanently overseas.

However, conversely, Australians who normally do live overseas can come and go as they please, subject to restrictions in travelling from their home countries, provided they can deal with 14 day isolation requirements when they arrive in Australia, and potentially when they return to their normal country of residence overseas as well.
Australian citizens and residents can arrive into Australia but definitely not come and go as they please, regardless of where they normally live. Temporary residents (for example student visa holders) can leave anytime but not re-enter. Exemptions apply, but you'll need a very good reason to travel.

Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
Would someone on a student visa be considered a resident for this purpose?

OTOH, if someone is a continuing student in a country other than where e person is a citizen, IMO it would definitely be wise to stay in the country where the person is studying. Returning home even if one has a multiple entry student visa constitutes an enormous risk in the current situation.
Definitely not. There are currently plenty of cases where students are stuck overseas, some of which have been living in Australia for years.
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Old May 13, 20, 9:38 pm
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If I was contemplating overseas travel from Australia, I would read this link, with information from the Australian Government (previously posted, above):

https://www.health.gov.au/news/healt...for-travellers

It contains this statement:

“.... There is currently a ban on all overseas travel from Australia, with few exceptions ....”

There are exceptions, but travellers should check.
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Old May 13, 20, 11:49 pm
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Originally Posted by WGTN View Post
Australian citizens and residents can arrive into Australia but definitely not come and go as they please, regardless of where they normally live. Temporary residents (for example student visa holders) can leave anytime but not re-enter. Exemptions apply, but you'll need a very good reason to travel.
I quote:
You will not need to apply for an exemption if you are:
  • ordinarily resident in a country other than Australia
So if you are an Australian citizen who is ordinarily resident in another country, then you do not need to apply for an exemption for travel. I assume, before your leave, some form of proof you are not resident in Australia ( I will be using my foreign identity card and apartment lease) will be required, although they could pull your immigration records to look at amount of time spent in Australia. In theory (i.e. the way the requirements are written) , this means Australian citizens who are foreign residents could come and go as they please. In practice though it will not mean that. Apart from being frowned upon (and potential for questioning whether the citizen is really a foreign resident), it is not really practical anyway with isolation requirements and restrictions imposed by many foreign countries on their residents travelling outside the country.
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Old May 14, 20, 2:37 am
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Originally Posted by lokijuh View Post
I quote:


So if you are an Australian citizen who is ordinarily resident in another country, then you do not need to apply for an exemption for travel. I assume, before your leave, some form of proof you are not resident in Australia ( I will be using my foreign identity card and apartment lease) will be required, although they could pull your immigration records to look at amount of time spent in Australia. In theory (i.e. the way the requirements are written) , this means Australian citizens who are foreign residents could come and go as they please. In practice though it will not mean that. Apart from being frowned upon (and potential for questioning whether the citizen is really a foreign resident), it is not really practical anyway with isolation requirements and restrictions imposed by many foreign countries on their residents travelling outside the country.
True, thanks for pointing that out.
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