Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Destinations > Asia > Japan
Reload this Page >

Which side of the escalator do you stand on?

Which side of the escalator do you stand on?

Old Jan 1, 19, 4:29 pm
  #16  
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA, Hilton
Programs: United, Hilton
Posts: 3,671
Itís common practice for people to stand on one side (left in Tokyo) to make way for walkers on the other side. However, itís common knowledge in Jpn that youíre not supposed to walk on escalators for safety reasons. And thatís throughout Jpn. Most escalators will have no walking signs, even though many people ignore them. The right thing is to stand.
evergrn is offline  
Old Jan 1, 19, 10:01 pm
  #17  
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: EUG/PDX
Programs: AS MVP Au, UA Ag, Marriott Ti, IHG Au, HH Ag, Nexus, Pilot FlyingJ Preferred, *$ Au
Posts: 4,086
Originally Posted by LapLap View Post
If there is crowding where the escalator begins, then sure, everyone should stand.

If it is quiet enough for there to be no crowding, only one side should be used for standing.
On escalators up from train platforms, I've often seen people maintain left side standing, right side climbing, even if it means the right side is empty with a crowd still for the left.

Did hear in a department store a couple weeks ago for the first time, or at least the first time I've noticed, an employee asking people to form two standing only lines. This was from 1F to 2F with a large number of people. Further up, folks seemed to gravitate to the left side as the numbers thinned.
rustykettel is offline  
Old Jan 7, 19, 1:33 am
  #18  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: TYO
Programs: UA MM *G, NH Plat/SFC, HH Diamond, GE
Posts: 176
In my both my home and work stations, the "right" or walking side of the escalators are heavily used by commuters. I heard about JR East's recent campaign to change that, but I can't imagine it being implemented.

Department store and tourist-heavy escalators I can understand it working as many non-japanese don't know the local rule anyway.
groovbusta is offline  
Old Jan 7, 19, 6:35 am
  #19  
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: YYZ
Programs: Aeroplan, Air Miles
Posts: 942
I cant remember which is which but I know Osaka and Tokyo are opposite sides.
Ichinensei is offline  
Old Jan 7, 19, 4:55 pm
  #20  
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,499
Originally Posted by Ichinensei View Post
I cant remember which is which but I know Osaka and Tokyo are opposite sides.
yup -- that's my memory as well (though I also can not remember)
SQTraveller is offline  
Old Jan 7, 19, 5:55 pm
  #21  
Moderator: Luxury Hotels and FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Palo Alto, California,USA
Posts: 17,011
In Osaka, you stand on the right; rest of Japan, it's the left. I always wondered if there is somewhere in between where you stand in the middle or if the shift is sudden. Doubt I will ever try to find out!
RichardInSF is offline  
Old Jan 7, 19, 6:07 pm
  #22  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: London
Posts: 13,848
Originally Posted by RichardInSF View Post
In Osaka, you stand on the right; rest of Japan, it's the left. I always wondered if there is somewhere in between where you stand in the middle or if the shift is sudden. Doubt I will ever try to find out!
There are quite a few escalators dotted around Tokyo which are narrow enough for standing in the middle to be near mandatory (there’s just such an example in the area feeding into Shirokane-Takanawa station - elsewhere the “rods” of the Atomium in Brussels house similar escalators. Here’s a video, too cool to resist!)
LapLap is offline  
Old Jul 25, 19, 4:39 pm
  #23  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Programs: SEIBU PRINCE CLUB Platinum, Hyatt Explorist, Marriott Gold, Cocos Gold
Posts: 14,522
Originally Posted by hailstorm View Post
Thanks to the concentrated efforts of JR, the answer is rapidly becoming "both", at least inside train stations. Never thought that rushing Japanese would stand for it (heh!), but now more often than not the escalators are packed with standers on both sides.

Or is this just a metro Tokyo phenomena?
Bump, as JR has stepped up their efforts as of late. Big posters by the escalator entrances in multiple languages informing of the "proper" use of the escalators, and even the occasional station attendee standing by thr escalators to enforce them.

Originally Posted by RichardInSF View Post
In Osaka, you stand on the right; rest of Japan, it's the left. I always wondered if there is somewhere in between where you stand in the middle or if the shift is sudden. Doubt I will ever try to find out!
There's probably a big expanse of inaka between them where few, if any, escalators exist.

Last edited by hailstorm; Jul 25, 19 at 4:46 pm
hailstorm is offline  
Old Jul 25, 19, 5:11 pm
  #24  
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: SFO
Programs: UA, AS, UR, MR
Posts: 557
It doesnít matter how big the poster is or whether itís right in front of you. People cannot be bothered to read signs. They are hardwired to their habits. Many will, consistently without fail, stand in the middle of the shopping aisle, preferably an intersection, when on their cell phone. If you walk up to them and kindly are curious why they do so, they would have no clue what to tell you.
vanillabean is offline  
Old Jul 25, 19, 5:12 pm
  #25  
mjm
Original Member
 
Join Date: May 1998
Location: Tokyo, Japan (or Vienna whenever possible)
Posts: 5,192
Roppongi Hills is pushing this too. The signs are clear and yet people tend to stand on the left and assume people will walk on the right. I stand squarely in the middle as I do not really want to wipe the escalator with my dress every morning.

I see this as a good policy, slow to be implemented, but important. If people are in such a rush they can consider leaving 1 minute earlier.
mjm is offline  
Old Jul 25, 19, 5:26 pm
  #26  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Programs: SEIBU PRINCE CLUB Platinum, Hyatt Explorist, Marriott Gold, Cocos Gold
Posts: 14,522
Originally Posted by vanillabean View Post
It doesn’t matter how big the poster is or whether it’s right in front of you.
Prior to the previous Tokyo Olympics, the city streets were often strewn with litter. An intensive campaign to raise awareness and clean the streets was undertaken. In only a few years, Tokyo became known as one of the cleanest metropoli in the world, and to this day Japanese are noted for cleaning up after themselves after public events, showing how engrained this changed way of thinking has become.

Where there's a will, there's a way. I will do my part, standing perfectly still holding the rail on the right hand side, smug in the knowledge of my correctness.
hailstorm is offline  
Old Jul 25, 19, 7:34 pm
  #27  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: TYO
Programs: UA MM *G, NH Plat/SFC, HH Diamond, GE
Posts: 176
Originally Posted by hailstorm View Post
Where there's a will, there's a way. I will do my part, standing perfectly still holding the rail on the right hand side, smug in the knowledge of my correctness.
Hold on tight, I've seen angry salarymen push their way past folks (usually foreigners/tourists) to get on their regularly scheduled trains. During non-commute hours, when clueless tourists outnumber office workers, you'll probably be fine.
groovbusta is offline  
Old Jul 25, 19, 8:07 pm
  #28  
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA, Hilton
Programs: United, Hilton
Posts: 3,671
Originally Posted by groovbusta View Post
I've seen angry salarymen push their way past folks (usually foreigners/tourists) to get on their regularly scheduled trains.
I've seen that too, actually quite often. I too think it's good idea to ban people from rushing up/down elevators for safety reasons, but it's going to be tough implementing it.

Japanese people can be downright aggressive in certain situations. People rush in like bull stampede to get in and secure seats on a shihatsu train (empty train leaving its first station) that my 2 kids and I were unable to sit together recently despite being at the front of the queue. When you're deplaning from a domestic flight, Japanese pax are so eager to get off the plane that majority of people already lined up in the aisle will not stop and let you out unless you force your way out.
evergrn is offline  
Old Jul 25, 19, 9:02 pm
  #29  
mjm
Original Member
 
Join Date: May 1998
Location: Tokyo, Japan (or Vienna whenever possible)
Posts: 5,192
This is when stress relief therapy comes in. More than once I have had to lay into some idiot who felt it best to shove me. I actually find it relieves stress to make such low life fly or otherwise reconsider their behavior. That said it is 100X worse in the US than here for sure.
mjm is offline  
Old Jul 25, 19, 9:15 pm
  #30  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Programs: SEIBU PRINCE CLUB Platinum, Hyatt Explorist, Marriott Gold, Cocos Gold
Posts: 14,522
Originally Posted by mjm View Post
This is when stress relief therapy comes in.
That was before Premium Friday solved everything. Now everyone leaves the office around 3pm on the last Friday of the month to get spritually rejuvenated with things like belly dancing lessons and community sock hops.

Most people thought that Premium Friday would be a flop, but gold old Abe sure proved them wrong!
hailstorm is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread