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Hong Kong to Ban Non-Residents and Transits Starting Wednesday, 25 March 2020

Hong Kong to Ban Non-Residents and Transits Starting Wednesday, 25 March 2020

Old Mar 23, 20, 6:14 am
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Hong Kong to Ban Non-Residents and Transits Starting Wednesday, 25 March 2020

Hong Kong will be banning non-residents from the territory starting Wednesday. Supposedly the ban will be in place for 14 days.

But apparently non-residents can continue to arrive by land from the Mainland, if they have been there for at least 14 days.

Transit passengers are also being banned.

Bars are being ordered not to serve alchohol.

Myself, I think this measure does very little good, given that non-resident arrivals are low in any event with the quarantine in place.

What the Government needs to do is provide quarantine for all arrivals, so they don't quarantine at home with their families, who are free to circulate outside. Or close the airport entirely.

Last edited by 889; Mar 23, 20 at 6:42 am
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Old Mar 23, 20, 10:56 am
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Originally Posted by 889 View Post
...
What the Government needs to do is provide quarantine for all arrivals, so they don't quarantine at home with their families, who are free to circulate outside. Or close the airport entirely.
https://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/enter...box=1584939087

A fourteen-day in a detention centre is the only solution for HKers who choose to return at this time.

Last edited by tentseller; Mar 23, 20 at 11:02 am
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Old Mar 24, 20, 5:34 am
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Or the household members already in HK could choose to quarantine with the people arriving. But may be logistically harder to implement.

If the entire household is arriving together then what's the difference, apart from the risk on the journey home - which is reason enough to make all arrivals stay in a holiday village for 2 weeks
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Old Mar 24, 20, 6:13 am
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I suspect the problem is not enough places in quarantine centres: it'd take over 100,000 places to store all new arrivals in Government quarantine centres for two weeks. So we end up with a half-measure that really doesn't do much good. Though of course the Government could wrist-band and quarantine family members as well.

(A great many recent arrivals are students coming back from overseas who aren't with their parents. Until they get home and start quarantine.)
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Old Mar 25, 20, 8:45 pm
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That's why we have the Hotels Eligible as Home Quarantine thread https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/32226376-post96.html . It's not just for tourists - HK FTers have been checking in their children and siblings.
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Old Jul 19, 20, 9:12 pm
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There's now an urging from an academic that if the situation worsens in the next week or two, Hong Kong should go into lockdown:

"港大微生物學系講座教授袁國勇表示,如果在新防疫措施實施7至14日後,新型肺炎的確診個案仍然呈幾何級 數增加,當局就應考慮實施「禁足令」,讓大部分人不能出門。"

https://news.rthk.hk/rthk/ch/compone...abChangeable=0

Is this just a professor's musing, or is it a serious risk? And if it is, is there a risk that the lockdown would shut down passenger flights at HKIA? If so, this would seriously affect those planning to return or leave in August.
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Old Jul 20, 20, 12:50 am
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Originally Posted by 889 View Post
There's now an urging from an academic that if the situation worsens in the next week or two, Hong Kong should go into lockdown:

"港大微生物學系講座教授袁國勇表示,如果在新防疫措施實施7至14日後,新型肺炎的確診個案仍然呈幾何級 數增加,當局就應考慮實施「禁足令」,讓大部分人不能出門。"

https://news.rthk.hk/rthk/ch/compone...abChangeable=0

Is this just a professor's musing, or is it a serious risk? And if it is, is there a risk that the lockdown would shut down passenger flights at HKIA? If so, this would seriously affect those planning to return or leave in August.
Yuen is the most influential of the three advisors.

Iím not sure an SAH automatically eliminates all inbound and outbound flights. I donít think this happened when Sydney implemented a form of SAH - just go straight home and quarantine
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Old Jul 20, 20, 1:09 am
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Not suggesting closure of the airport to passenger flights would automatically follow. Some countries close everything, some don't. I just wanted to waive a warning flag at anyone planning to return to Hong Kong in the near future or planning to leave.

Even without formally ordering airport closure, an SAH I suspect would lead to reduced demand for flights and some operating hassles with crew, and that alone might lead to reduced flights.

I do think there's a real risk that that sort of talk by the professor will lead to hoarding and shortages in the shops in the next few days. Maybe not very wise in that respect.
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Old Jul 20, 20, 6:53 am
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I'm watching the full version interview with Professor Yuen

He suggested if foreign crews refuse to be tested, they should be held at airport until their next departure (i.e. turnaround is fine with him).
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Old Jul 20, 20, 7:38 am
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An interesting aspect is the relationship of the airport opening to the limited testing capacity.

So far as I can gather, Hong Kong only has the ability to carry out a few thousand tests per day, maybe something on the order of 5000 tests or so. If the airport were closed, there'd be about 1000 more tests available for those already in Hong Kong. If the situation were to deteriorate, the need for that extra testing capacity might be severe.

The limited testing capacity also offers a suggestion why Hong Kong hasn't even hinted at relaxation of the residents-only rule: the ability to test more than a few thousand arrivals per day just isn't there.
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Old Jul 21, 20, 6:07 am
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"The Government today clarified the rumour that it may impose a so-called lockdown in the coming few days in view of the COVID-19 outbreak is unfounded. It said in view of the severe epidemic situation, everyone should fight the disease together, adding that the public should not be misled by fake news nor spread any rumour that can lead to unnecessary fear. The Government urged citizens to continue to comply with the guidelines on social distancing, go out less and maintain strict personal and environmental hygiene. They should also stay alert to government announcements on the latest COVID-19 news."

https://www.news.gov.hk/eng/2020/07/...81111_694.html
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Old Jul 22, 20, 1:03 am
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Those arriving from the U.S. are now going to be subject to the same strict rules as those arriving from India, Indonesia, etc. That means no home quarantine: hotel bookings must be shown. And it means a PCR test no more than 72 hours before departure. Together with a letter from the local government certifying the lab is authorised to do the test. I suspect that last item will in many cases be impossible to obtain, certainly in a rush before departure. As a practical matter, I suspect this will cut off travel from the U.S. And it may affect outbound traffic as well, making return much more of a hassle. All of which may lead to flight reductions.

https://www.coronavirus.gov.hk/eng/h...sk-places.html
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Old Jul 28, 20, 2:14 am
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"An Indonesian who flew via Hong Kong to Beijing was confirmed to have been infected with the coronavirus on Monday [July 27], according to a Beijing official, state media reported."

But transits to the Mainland via HKIA are blocked, supposedly. Are there loopholes in the rule? Could this have been a private aircraft?

https://www.thestandard.com.hk/break...ijing-infected
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Old Jul 28, 20, 10:04 am
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Originally Posted by 889 View Post
Those arriving from the U.S. are now going to be subject to the same strict rules as those arriving from India, Indonesia, etc. That means no home quarantine: hotel bookings must be shown. And it means a PCR test no more than 72 hours before departure. Together with a letter from the local government certifying the lab is authorised to do the test. I suspect that last item will in many cases be impossible to obtain, certainly in a rush before departure. As a practical matter, I suspect this will cut off travel from the U.S. And it may affect outbound traffic as well, making return much more of a hassle. All of which may lead to flight reductions.

https://www.coronavirus.gov.hk/eng/h...sk-places.html
100+ pax were offloaded on yesterday's JFK-HKG I heard as they were not able to satisfy the requirements.
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Old Jul 28, 20, 11:07 am
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The far more interesting question is, was ANYONE left on board who could possibly comply with those requirements?

It's a bureaucratic technique you often find in China, and perhaps elsewhere. They don't want to come right out and say "No," so they send you off on a goose-chase to track down some additional documents which only the most determined can find. In this case a lab report with your passport number printed on it and a government letter certifying the lab is authorised to conduct the test.
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