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Crock Pot Express Pot vs. Instant Pot vs. Do I Really Need This?

Crock Pot Express Pot vs. Instant Pot vs. Do I Really Need This?

Old Nov 23, 17, 10:55 am
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Crock Pot Express Pot vs. Instant Pot vs. Do I Really Need This?

I've seen friends raving about their Instant Pot and now I'm seeing commercials for the Crock Pot Express Pot. I'm pondering if I need one and if I do, which one. So, tell me all I need to know about one or both, and the benefits!
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Old Nov 23, 17, 10:58 am
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Pressure cooker isn't it?
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Old Nov 23, 17, 11:09 am
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Originally Posted by rickg523 View Post
Pressure cooker isn't it?
Yes, both are.
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Old Nov 23, 17, 11:37 am
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Originally Posted by kipper View Post
Yes, both are.
Do you really need a pressure cooker?
Pork shoulder you want cooked in an hour? Instead of in the Crock-Pot for 6-8? I can see that.
Honestly, I cook from scratch everyday and haven't found I miss a pressure cooker. YMMV, of course.
If I did, pricing would be a factor. If these are pressure cookers with integrated timers, I would price a conventional cooker and a timer. I'd go maybe 20 bucks extra for one of these models.
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Old Nov 23, 17, 11:40 am
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Originally Posted by rickg523 View Post
Do you really need a pressure cooker?
Pork shoulder you want cooked in an hour? Instead of in the Crock-Pot for 6-8? I can see that.
Honestly, I cook from scratch everyday and haven't found I miss a pressure cooker. YMMV, of course.
If I did, pricing would be a factor. If these are pressure cookers with integrated timers, I would price a conventional cooker and a timer. I'd go maybe 20 bucks extra for one of these models.
Mr. Kipper isn't a fan of much cooked in a crock pot, other than soups, stews, and chilis. I like the option of being able to throw something together at the last minute.
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Old Nov 23, 17, 12:21 pm
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We use our stovetop pressure cooker quite often. We mainly use it for risottos, beans and lentils. Risotto takes 5-7 minutes and beans don't need pre-soaking. Stews and large flavourful cuts take about half their usual time. Smashed new potatoes are also a quick and easy side that can be ready in 10 minutes or less now. For sizes, the smaller size is better for risotto as it will not burn in the time it takes for the steam pressure to build up. However, the taller larger size is better for roasts and making bone broths. An all purpose size would be the middle 3.5 qt size range where you can still make risottos without scorching the bottom and cook smaller cuts of meat.

The advantages of an electric pressure cooker over a stove top one is that the temperature can be easily set and easily controlled. For a regular pressure cooker, you are never really able to walk away from it as the temperature does fluctuate depending on your cooktop. I've also been looking at the Instant Pot too but can't justify getting one since I have a few stove top ones.

I personally don't use crockpots that often as I'm not comfortable leaving something on while I'm away. I use Thermopots instead for that purpose. If I am to be home then I just use my French oven.

Last edited by tcl; Nov 23, 17 at 12:23 pm Reason: clarification
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Old Nov 23, 17, 1:05 pm
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Originally Posted by tcl View Post
We use our stovetop pressure cooker quite often. We mainly use it for risottos, beans and lentils. Risotto takes 5-7 minutes and beans don't need pre-soaking. Stews and large flavourful cuts take about half their usual time. Smashed new potatoes are also a quick and easy side that can be ready in 10 minutes or less now. For sizes, the smaller size is better for risotto as it will not burn in the time it takes for the steam pressure to build up. However, the taller larger size is better for roasts and making bone broths. An all purpose size would be the middle 3.5 qt size range where you can still make risottos without scorching the bottom and cook smaller cuts of meat.

The advantages of an electric pressure cooker over a stove top one is that the temperature can be easily set and easily controlled. For a regular pressure cooker, you are never really able to walk away from it as the temperature does fluctuate depending on your cooktop. I've also been looking at the Instant Pot too but can't justify getting one since I have a few stove top ones.

I personally don't use crockpots that often as I'm not comfortable leaving something on while I'm away. I use Thermopots instead for that purpose. If I am to be home then I just use my French oven.
Great information. You just about convinced me to get one for quick sides, and then I'd use it for shortcutting tough cut cook times, though I'm not against slow cookers.
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Old Nov 23, 17, 2:11 pm
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Originally Posted by tcl View Post
We use our stovetop pressure cooker quite often. We mainly use it for risottos, beans and lentils. Risotto takes 5-7 minutes and beans don't need pre-soaking. Stews and large flavourful cuts take about half their usual time. Smashed new potatoes are also a quick and easy side that can be ready in 10 minutes or less now. For sizes, the smaller size is better for risotto as it will not burn in the time it takes for the steam pressure to build up. However, the taller larger size is better for roasts and making bone broths. An all purpose size would be the middle 3.5 qt size range where you can still make risottos without scorching the bottom and cook smaller cuts of meat.

The advantages of an electric pressure cooker over a stove top one is that the temperature can be easily set and easily controlled. For a regular pressure cooker, you are never really able to walk away from it as the temperature does fluctuate depending on your cooktop. I've also been looking at the Instant Pot too but can't justify getting one since I have a few stove top ones.

I personally don't use crockpots that often as I'm not comfortable leaving something on while I'm away. I use Thermopots instead for that purpose. If I am to be home then I just use my French oven.
I don't mind leaving the crock pot on while we're not home, because we have one that has a timer and auto-shut off or turn to warm.
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Old Nov 23, 17, 3:33 pm
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Originally Posted by rickg523 View Post
Great information. You just about convinced me to get one for quick sides, and then I'd use it for shortcutting tough cut cook times, though I'm not against slow cookers.
The pressure cooker is awesome for tough flavourful cuts but you actually don't save that much time overall as the secret to cooking tough muscle cuts is to let it come off pressure naturally as opposed to quick release or cold water method. The quick release causes the muscle meat to seize somehow and become dry and tough. If planned properly, the pressure cooker is awesome for parcooking.

For our Turkey Day celebrations our pressure cooker sides are porcini mushroom risotto, smashed herbed potatoes and curried warm lentil salad.
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Old Nov 23, 17, 10:18 pm
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Originally Posted by tcl View Post
For our Turkey Day celebrations our pressure cooker sides are porcini mushroom risotto, smashed herbed potatoes and curried warm lentil salad.
Would you share the lentil recipe, pls?
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Old Nov 24, 17, 2:31 am
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I regularly make about 7lb of pork shoulder in my InstantPot. I set it for 90 mins at high pressure and it takes about another hour to heat up and cool down.

It is not as good as slow roasting in the oven for 6-12 hours - the fat does not render in the same way.

I don't find that it typically makes things any better than the normal methods, but it is far faster. It just depends on how you value that tradeoff.
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Old Nov 24, 17, 6:42 am
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My Instant Pot is still in the box. I haven't figured out how to use the darn thing. Bought the Instant Pot cookbook. Hopefully, I will use it soon. I use my crockpot for chili, but I heard the Instant Pot is easy to use as well. I just don't want to blow up my kitchen.
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Old Nov 24, 17, 2:29 pm
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Originally Posted by CDTraveler View Post
Would you share the lentil recipe, pls?
YHPM
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Old Nov 24, 17, 7:35 pm
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Originally Posted by CosmosHuman View Post
My Instant Pot is still in the box. I haven't figured out how to use the darn thing. Bought the Instant Pot cookbook. Hopefully, I will use it soon. I use my crockpot for chili, but I heard the Instant Pot is easy to use as well. I just don't want to blow up my kitchen.
That's my fear. I'll buy one and not be able to figure out how to use it without blowing up the kitchen.
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Old Nov 25, 17, 2:08 am
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Originally Posted by kipper View Post
That's my fear. I'll buy one and not be able to figure out how to use it without blowing up the kitchen.

My wife got an 8 quart instant pot and loves it. She got one yesterday as a gift for her brother. She has used it for meats and soups. She said it is spectacular for making great soups.
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