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Why is Ramen so Popular in the US?

Why is Ramen so Popular in the US?

Old Mar 28, 12, 7:56 am
  #31  
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It's bad for you and tastes good, why wouldn't that be popular in the U.S.?
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Old Apr 3, 12, 3:49 pm
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Here in US, abundance of college students still manage to survive on a solid diet of ramen noodles, cold cereal and beer to wash it all down.
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Old Apr 3, 12, 4:05 pm
  #33  
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Is ramen a less handy version of the British 'Pot Noodle'? I've never had ramen but it sounds like it (at least the supermarket option).
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Old Apr 3, 12, 4:18 pm
  #34  
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Originally Posted by emma69 View Post
Is ramen a less handy version of the British 'Pot Noodle'? I've never had ramen but it sounds like it (at least the supermarket option).
When I think of supermarket ramen, this is what comes to mind. I've never had British "Pot Noodles", so I can't say if they are less handy or not.

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Old Apr 4, 12, 7:01 am
  #35  
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Ah, so they do come in their own bowl - when I googled they seemed to be in a plastic packet (no bowl). Same idea as a pot noodle then, self contained, just add hot water.


Originally Posted by Starwood Lurker View Post
Originally Posted by emma69 View Post
Is ramen a less handy version of the British 'Pot Noodle'? I've never had ramen but it sounds like it (at least the supermarket option).
When I think of supermarket ramen, this is what comes to mind. I've never had British "Pot Noodles", so I can't say if they are less handy or not.

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Old Apr 4, 12, 9:22 am
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Originally Posted by emma69 View Post
Is ramen a less handy version of the British 'Pot Noodle'? I've never had ramen but it sounds like it (at least the supermarket option).
the british 'pot noodle' is a direct copy of cup noodle ramyun.
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Old Apr 4, 12, 9:32 am
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Originally Posted by Mabuk dan gila View Post
I betcha' 95% of the US population would equate "Ramen" only with cheap packs of instant noodles and would be completely unable to associate the word with any thing else.
Cheap student food indeed is a rather common US association for Ramen noodles.
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Old Apr 4, 12, 10:19 am
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Disagree

Originally Posted by JerryFF View Post
Ramen is so much more popular in the US than udon or soba, but in Japan, it seems to be just the opposite. It never occurred to me before, but now I really wonder why. Any thoughts?

it's an assumption of innocent ignorance. by and large, the majority of the population couldn't tell you the difference between ramen, soba and udon - and, probably, collectively calls all asian noodles "ramen".

add to the fact that many of us in the states have grown up eating "Top Ramen" at some point or another and Ramen has kind of become an accepted term for asian style noodles.

even so, without digressing too much, i would probably disagree with your assumption that udon and soba are more popular in Japan. IMO, Ramen is pretty popular and generally more available than soba or udon. Haven't seen too many places that just serve soba or just udon, but many places just serve Ramen. Check out these blogs:

http://www.bento.com/rev/tokyoramen.html

http://www.ramenadventures.com/
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Old Apr 4, 12, 12:17 pm
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Originally Posted by emma69 View Post
Ah, so they do come in their own bowl - when I googled they seemed to be in a plastic packet (no bowl). Same idea as a pot noodle then, self contained, just add hot water.
Yes, well except for the plastic packet version, that is.

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Old Apr 4, 12, 12:39 pm
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Originally Posted by Starwood Lurker View Post
Yes, well except for the plastic packet version, that is.
Ramen come in both bowl and plastic packet versions at U.S. supermarkets as well.

In Asia, particularly in Taiwan, the bowl version tends to be more expensive, and sometimes more "luxurious", than the plastic packet one.

Originally Posted by Tat0nka View Post
it's an assumption of innocent ignorance. by and large, the majority of the population couldn't tell you the difference between ramen, soba and udon - and, probably, collectively calls all asian noodles "ramen".

add to the fact that many of us in the states have grown up eating "Top Ramen" at some point or another and Ramen has kind of become an accepted term for asian style noodles.
I would think so that ramen acts like an umbrella/blanket term for Americans for a variety of Asian style noodles.

When I first came to the States for study, I had to look up the dictionary and asked around what Americans meant for "ramen." Americans' ramen is different from what I know about Asia noodles, including Cantonese, Chinese, Japanese & Taiwanese styles, that I grow up with.

Last edited by lin821; Apr 4, 12 at 12:52 pm
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Old Apr 4, 12, 12:44 pm
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Originally Posted by lin821 View Post
Ramen come in both bowl and plastic packet versions at U.S. supermarkets as well...
Believe when I say that I'm very familiar with this.

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Old Apr 4, 12, 12:47 pm
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Originally Posted by Starwood Lurker View Post
Believe when I say that I'm very familiar with this.
Without any doubt.

I was merely providing a frame of reference for our UK readers who do know about "ramen."
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Old Apr 4, 12, 1:19 pm
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Originally Posted by notsosmart View Post
Indeed, good ramen from a ramen shop is something completely different from packaged ramen. Although they both fill a need, and both bring back good memories...
OMG ramen shops, I live in Vancouver, BC, we have rthem and I miss when travelling usually ramen is for me, too spicy it's just perfect here.
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Old Apr 5, 12, 4:58 am
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Am I the only one who is horrified to read how much salt is in those Ramen packs? I'll never touch one again.
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Old Apr 5, 12, 9:52 am
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Originally Posted by ByrdluvsAWACO View Post
Am I the only one who is horrified to read how much salt is in those Ramen packs? I'll never touch one again.
Just use half a packet.
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