Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Destinations > Americas > Brazil
Reload this Page >

Current (2019) situation in Rio?

Current (2019) situation in Rio?

Old Jan 16, 19, 9:34 am
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: London, UK
Programs: Flying Club, Avios, Shangri La
Posts: 15
Current (2019) situation in Rio?

Apologies if this is against the laws of aviation, or already asked a million times.

I impulsively booked flights to Rio, with the plan to spend a few days there then fly out to Iguazu Falls. Only then did I start to research Rio in more depth, and a lot of the English language stories and news reports I've seen are not exactly selling it to me ("War on the streets of Rio", "Armed shootouts" on major roads in daytime, "Tourists murdered/robbed", etc). Coming from Europe, the murder rate seems astoundingly high. I'm aware the new President has promised to crackdown, and have read a military intervention in Rio just ended, and the governor is talking up a police shoot-to-kill policy.

Of course it's difficult to get a real sense of day to day life in Rio by reading such things, but I'm now somewhat nervous about visiting. What's the situation there at the moment?

Thanks in advance.
spaceh0pper is offline  
Old Jan 16, 19, 9:41 am
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: ELP
Programs: AA EXP/LT GOLD, RC PLAT PREM
Posts: 3,855
Heading to Rio in two weeks. Will advise when I on the ground there.
spaceh0pper likes this.
anaggie is online now  
Old Jan 16, 19, 9:43 am
  #3  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: London, UK
Programs: Flying Club, Avios, Shangri La
Posts: 15
Originally Posted by anaggie View Post
Heading to Rio in two weeks. Will advise when I on the ground there.
Thanks. If I don't hear from you, I guess I'll have my answer!

Good luck and enjoy the trip, it looks beautiful.
spaceh0pper is offline  
Old Jan 16, 19, 6:36 pm
  #4  
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Chicago
Posts: 142
For the areas you will most likely be going I would describe the situation as normal for Rio which is to say much more dangerous than anything you have ever experienced (probably) yet still unlikely that something bad will happen to you in particular. I encourage you to keep your plans and also to be very smart about about where you go and what you bring with you (jewelry, extra money, extra phone/camera etc).
spaceh0pper likes this.
Esmjb is offline  
Old Jan 19, 19, 4:35 pm
  #5  
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,283
In the unlikely eventuality that you get robbed, hand over your valuables and do not react, as criminals are vicious and will become violent.
spaceh0pper likes this.
boboqui is offline  
Old Jan 20, 19, 7:54 am
  #6  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,654
Originally Posted by spaceh0pper View Post
Apologies if this is against the laws of aviation, or already asked a million times.

I impulsively booked flights to Rio, with the plan to spend a few days there then fly out to Iguazu Falls. Only then did I start to research Rio in more depth, and a lot of the English language stories and news reports I've seen are not exactly selling it to me ("War on the streets of Rio", "Armed shootouts" on major roads in daytime, "Tourists murdered/robbed", etc). Coming from Europe, the murder rate seems astoundingly high. I'm aware the new President has promised to crackdown, and have read a military intervention in Rio just ended, and the governor is talking up a police shoot-to-kill policy.

Of course it's difficult to get a real sense of day to day life in Rio by reading such things, but I'm now somewhat nervous about visiting. What's the situation there at the moment?

Thanks in advance.
Brazil is a place where you must always be aware of your surroundings, reading the street and following your gut feeling. For Brazilians, it becomes second nature, so you as a visitor may not notice.
There's an economic crisis and a new, right-wing president trying to impose his thinking, both of which have repercussions.
As a tourist, you will not have cause to be in the neighborhoods where most crime occurs, or where there is frequent unrest between police and drug dealers.. Tourists may encounter opportunistic crime like 'snatch and run', so do not carry anything that gives thieves that opportunity, and secure well any possessions you do carry with you (i.e. don't stick your arm out to take a photo with your cell phone without noticing the kid on the bike who could swoop by and grab it). Don't walk into deserted areas; common sense. The occasional unlucky, heedless, or particularly unprepared tourist may stumble into a worse situation, but it is an exception IMO. It does make for exciting headlines though, so the media fixates on these incidents. Don't take anything to Brazil that you can't afford, financially or emotionally, to give up easily in a nanosecond, though, in such an unlikely case.
That said, I have spent considerable time all over Brazil for the last 20 years and have had no problems. Once you get your feet on the ground, you will likely be surprised at how unlike the lurid media descriptions the reality is.
I have no doubt you will enjoy your trip to Rio and be planning the next visit before you even depart.
spaceh0pper likes this.
VidaNaPraia is offline  
Old Feb 8, 19, 1:23 am
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: ELP
Programs: AA EXP/LT GOLD, RC PLAT PREM
Posts: 3,855
Originally Posted by spaceh0pper View Post
Thanks. If I don't hear from you, I guess I'll have my answer!

Good luck and enjoy the trip, it looks beautiful.
Finally made it down here for some work and of course, some play !!

Staying at the JW Marriott and the situation feels like any other time I have been down here. Walked around yesterday to get something to eat and did some basic shopping for water bottles and pharmacy items. Went for dinner about 6 blocks away from the hotel and walked back at night.

Hired a driver to take me to Arraial Do Cabo for one day and had no issues walking around. Lots of tourists and lots of people walking around.

Of course, you need to be aware of your surroundings and not wear anything that will attract people to you.

If you have any other questions, please feel free to ask.

Last edited by anaggie; Feb 10, 19 at 5:08 am
anaggie is online now  
Old Apr 5, 19, 2:10 am
  #8  
 
Join Date: May 1998
Location: australia
Posts: 4,898
Originally Posted by VidaNaPraia View Post
Don't take anything to Brazil that you can't afford, financially or emotionally, to give up easily in a nanosecond,
Its good to know that I can take my wife and children then
malagajohn, SFO777, NPF and 1 others like this.

Last edited by 3544quebec; Apr 5, 19 at 2:16 am
3544quebec is offline  
Old Apr 5, 19, 10:30 am
  #9  
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,283

Today on Corcovado.
boboqui is offline  
Old Apr 5, 19, 10:38 am
  #10  
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: New York, NY
Programs: AA CK, A3 Gold, spg100
Posts: 3,724
My friend who goes down there 2-3 times a year either has a phone stolen or an ATM card skimmed every single visit. He obviously loves it down there and can afford the loss, but there are indeed significant safety concerns.
justforfun is online now  
Old Apr 6, 19, 4:14 am
  #11  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: my heart is on the shores of the north Italian lakes
Programs: LH Senator ** (ex SR TC G), Relais&Chateaux Club5C, ex ! "Amanjunkie", ex LHW LC, hate chain hotels
Posts: 1,723
Originally Posted by justforfun View Post
My friend who goes down there 2-3 times a year either has a phone stolen or an ATM card skimmed every single visit. He obviously loves it down there and can afford the loss, but there are indeed significant safety concerns.
My credit card has been skimmed last time at a reputable fine dining hotel in France..... Still remember the hassle including police report etc..... And yes, well done for any phone stolen from people looking at it while walking instead of minding their step.....

Of course I will even not wear a watch or jewellery in South America and never use my mobile phone on the street while walking (typically go in a shop or an entrance way) Also carrying a minimum of cash and only ONE valid credit card (along with some canceled ones) as well as copy of my passport.

Feel never so relaxed like in Rio (South America in general) as I know exactly that it can be dangerous, hence I am careful.

Another safety tip: Use only Uber (black), not the local cabs (paseo del milionario) and at night do not walk alone, at least two men per group.
behuman is online now  
Old Apr 6, 19, 7:17 am
  #12  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,654
Originally Posted by behuman View Post
....at night do not walk alone, at least two men per group.
Maybe it's a great way for single women to meet men, if that's the case,. LOL
But I, a solo female visiting regularly, have been walking there for 20 years without a problem. Hmmmmmm.....
VidaNaPraia is offline  
Old Apr 6, 19, 10:01 pm
  #13  
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 4
Rio is a hit or miss, one never knows. I've been there many times and never had a problem, but it's important to be careful and avoid situations that can become dangerous: public transportation, walking dark streets at night, or even being alone in an area you're not familiar with.
I would stick to the Zona Sul area (south zone) of Leme, Copacabana, Ipanema, Leblon and Barra da Tijuca. But even in these areas, considered safer, try to avoid carrying too much money, expensive cameras, watches, etc. The idea is to blend with the rest of the people. Always ask locals you know and trust (hopefully you'll have some) or people in your hotel where it's safe to go and what to avoid. They know.
With all that said, Rio is a magic city, full of energy, music and dance, and despite all the problems a place I love to go back to.
Hope it helps.
BeasBest is offline  
Old Apr 18, 19, 7:13 pm
  #14  
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: UK. BAEC AAdvantage
Programs: Mucci Des Oeufs Brouilles et des Canards
Posts: 3,259
Been a few years since I've been to Rio and we heeded the advice of not taking any valuables out with us and dressing down.

We stayed in Ipanema at a hotel on the main street. Met a man at breakfast from Sao Paulo who told us to be vigilante etc. He was annoyed at the hotel as they wouldn't let his brother come up and wait while he got ready. It seems a lot of hotels have/had a no visitors policy!

We noticed the high railings on apartment blocks, and the visibly armed guards when they were bringing cash to a store - but that didn't stop us having a good time. We took the metro up into the main part of town and to Sugarloaf mountain to watch the most spectacular sunset I've ever seen (much better than the fabled Key West one) and even caught the bus back from there to our hotel - despite it being dark.

The main issue we had was the lack of people that spoke English, even at restaurants and fast food joints. We went back to the same place twice for dinner because they had a menu in English so we could just point and order!

The only time I felt ripped off was when I pre-ordered a limo/taxi from the airport. They seem to be offering big discounts to those passing by compared to what I paid.The taxi back to the airport ordered by the hotel was half the price.

Just be sensible, stay in well lit areas (a few streets off the main drag were darker, but we were ok) don't have anything on you that you are sentimental about. Leave a spare credit card in your hotel safe and have an RFID proof wallet to stop any skimming. I'm pretty sure everywhere we went was Chip and Pin so the card was always in our control.

Enjoy!
dddc is offline  
Old Apr 19, 19, 4:45 am
  #15  
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Chicago
Posts: 142
Originally Posted by dddc View Post
The only time I felt ripped off was when I pre-ordered a limo/taxi from the airport. They seem to be offering big discounts to those passing by compared to what I paid.The taxi back to the airport ordered by the hotel was half the price.
Did you pay 200 reais for the ride from the airport and 100 reais to the airport when you could have gotten an Uber both ways for 50 each?
Esmjb is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread