Service Mini-Horse Flies AA ORD-OMA

Old Sep 2, 19, 10:48 am
  #1  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: ORD/MDW
Programs: AA, HH, MR elite. Fly mostly AA/WN/B6.
Posts: 18,773
Service Mini-Horse Flies AA ORD-OMA

The horse's name was Flirty.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/travel/9844...ervice-animal/

According the the article, AA policy allows small horses in the cabin. They can weigh up to 250 pounds.

Now I've seen everything.
moondog, GTITAN and jhalapin like this.
BearX220 is offline  
Old Sep 2, 19, 11:04 am
  #2  
Accor Contributor Badge
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: NYC
Programs: DL KM, Bonvoy Gold, RHG Gold, Accor Silver, Hilton Silver, Natl EE, Avis PC, Greyhound RR
Posts: 5,163
It looks like this was a service animal and not an emotional support animal. The two roles are very different.

In terms of service animals (and not ESAs), miniature horses are some of the best. They are smarter than dogs and live much longer, meaning fewer animals to train and bond with over a person's lifetime. For someone who is mobility impaired, they can also lean on the horse which is a great benefit.

-J.
JDiver likes this.
GW McLintock is offline  
Old Sep 2, 19, 11:09 am
  #3  
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Programs: AA LT Plat
Posts: 3,680
Reading the subject line (before it was edited), I thought someone was using horse flies for emotional support. They take up very little space on a plane; on the other hand, they bite.
.

Last edited by SeeBuyFly; Sep 2, 19 at 12:09 pm
SeeBuyFly is offline  
Old Sep 2, 19, 11:17 am
  #4  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 30,186
I saw this on Yahoo yesterday, and wanted to post it on FT, but couldn't think of a good thread/home for it. I must say that I was quite impressed by the story.
moondog is online now  
Old Sep 2, 19, 11:18 am
  #5  
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Programs: AA PLT, SPG Gold
Posts: 2,159
Seems like there is no end in sight to this madness. If someone can't even set foot on a plane due to whatever condition they have, maybe they ought to get that treated first.
no1cub17 is offline  
Old Sep 2, 19, 11:21 am
  #6  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 30,186
Originally Posted by no1cub17 View Post
Seems like there is no end in sight to this madness. If someone can't even set foot on a plane due to whatever condition they have, maybe they ought to get that treated first.
Posts like this make emotional support horses sad.
moondog is online now  
Old Sep 2, 19, 12:02 pm
  #7  
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: SAN
Programs: AA EXP, US, DL, CO
Posts: 491
I am assuming that the passenger and horse had the entire bulkhead row to themselves. If not, I wouldn’t want to be the guy in the middle seat in that scenario.
AA100k is offline  
Old Sep 2, 19, 12:15 pm
  #8  
Moderator: American AAdvantage, TAP, Mexico, Technical Support and Feedback, and The Suggestion Box
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: NorCal - SMF area
Programs: AA LT Plat; HH LT Diamond, Maître-plongeur des Muccis
Posts: 61,512
This was a Service Animal horse, a miniature horse. Service Horses are legitimate, service trained and necessary for their owners to successfully perform activities are daily living. American Airlines (and the Air Carrier Access Act) follow current Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines regarding service miniature horses. The most common use for a service horse is as a guide animal for people who are blind.

A service animal is defined as an animal that ‘is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability’. In 2011, the only animal recognized as a service animal was a dog. However recently the laws have changed to allow miniature horses to be trained to work and perform tasks for someone with a disability. These are new and separate provisions from the ADA which allows both service dogs and service miniature horses to be recognized as service animals and support a disabled person.

Under the American’s with Disabilities Act, the new regulations state that places and policies that are already in place must now permit miniature horses, where reasonable, to be treated the same as dogs.

The miniature horses should be 24 inches to 34 inches in height and weight around 70 to 100 pounds. There are four regulations provided by the ADA which work as assessment factors to determine where a miniature horse can enter a facility:
  • Whether the miniature horse is housebroken
  • If the miniature horse is under control
  • If the facility can accommodate the miniature horse’s size, weight, and type
  • Whether the miniature horse will not compromise safety requirements for safe operation for the whole of the facility and other members of the public

As miniature horses are much bigger than dogs, they have to follow more regulations to ensure they are providing a safe service to their owner as well as the people around them. Link.
We will reticle this thread and close it. /Moderator
aztimm and GW McLintock like this.
JDiver is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread