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Tanzania Travel Overview

Tanzania Travel Overview

Old Jun 7, 20, 4:52 am
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Tanzania Travel Overview

I know many people have travelled to Tanzania, or East Africa in general, I have visited many countries in Africa as well! Tanzania is one of the great Safari Country! My idea to start this thread that every one can share their experience about Tanzania, and for those who have never been to Tanzania will have the opportunity to ask Questions and learn about Tanzania.

Below is just brief text about Tanzania, I will be updating the text now and then, and Just in case anyone has experience about Tanzania and would like to share or add, is invited to do so.... welcome all!


Highlight:

Tanzania is a big country, and the main safari destinations can be split into the north (The Serengeti and Ngorongoro Crater) or the south (The Selous and Ruaha). Most tourists flock to the north as it is comprised of the famed highlights of Tanzania – and rightly so as the wildlife is phenomenal.

Tanzania Safari Parks and Wildlife:

The status of Tanzania safari parks as a primary destination for wildlife explorers has been reflected in the expeditions of The National Geographic, The Discovery and The Animal Planet. Indeed, Northern Tanzanian parks are fantastic - Serengeti offers unique lion safaris and The Great Migration, Tarangire is famous for its fascinating elephant safaris, and Ngorongoro enjoys the reputation of a place with the highest density of wild animals. Lake Manyara with its flocks of pink flamingos and Mahale and Gombe parks with the largest population of chimpanzees are also must-have pieces to the collection of any avid traveller. Undoubtedly Tanzania is the best place for completing your full African wildlife safaris list.

Mountain Climbing in Tanzania:

The most frequent expeditions are obviously to Mt. Kilimanjaro and Mt. Meru, but there are also other destinations such as the Crater Highlands.

Tanzania mountains vary in height, location, climate etc. Kilimanjaro which is the highest mountain in Africa have attracted many climbers from around the globe. Mount Meru (4566m.) and Ol Donyo Lengai (active volcano) are also popular. Other mountains in Tanzania are Mt. Hanang (3417m.), Longido (2629m.), Usambara Mountains, Mt. Lemagrut, Mt. Lolmalasin, Mt Oldean, Uluguru Mountains, etc.

Every mountain is unique from each other, and this makes it important to be well informed before deciding which one to climb. In Tanzania, most climbers opt for Kilimanjaro and Mount Meru. Meru is Africa’s fifth highest peak with fabulous views of Mt. Kilimanjaro and the Momela Lakes from the summit. The challenging ascent to the crater of Ol Donyo Lengai passes through some fantastic scenery with panoramic views of the Rift Valley. The trek to the top of Lengai is very steep and a true challenge which is attempted only by hikers with good level of fitness.








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Old Jun 11, 20, 7:28 pm
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Lets not forget the beautiful beaches of Zanzibar!
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Old Jun 11, 20, 8:22 pm
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ZANZIBAR ISLAND - PART OF TANZANIAZanzibar is the name given to the archipelago of islands that lies around 35 km off the coast of mainland Tanzania. The main islands are Unguja (informally known as Zanzibar and referred to as such throughout this site) and Pemba. There are also several smaller islands, many that can be visited and many that can’t.

Zanzibar Seasons and Festivals

The height of summer on Zanzibar is mid June and winter is in December. However, the islands are warm all year round due to their proximity to the equator.

The short rains occur November – December. Expect frequent showers that do not last long. Some coastlines can get very sea-weed heavy at this time. The long rains fall between April and May. The rainy seasons are tourist low-seasons so for those looking for seclusion and not so bothered by the weather they can be appealing. The rains are not normally continuous, but do not be too optimistic about rain not putting (if the pun can be excused) a damper on things.

Ramadan is one festival most tourists aim to avoid (especially those travelling to Stone Town) as many restaurants close during the day and eating in public before nightfall can be very awkward. However, the Eid-al-Ftir (end of Ramadan) is an excellent day to be in Stone Town as feasting and partying takes over the city, and all are welcomed.

Since Muslims do not ingest any foods or fluids from first light until last light during the period of Ramadan, and as religious fervour is heightened during this period, and exhibitions of what locals would deem immodesty will be regarded with less tolerance than at other times.

Zanzibar itself is home to two major festivals; the Sauti za Busara music festival in February and the Zanzibar International Film Festival in July. Both these take place in Stone Town and the city gets hugely busy during both. Another music festival has also recently sprung up, this one in Kizimkazi on the south coast; The Kizimkazi Cultural Music Festival.


Why Choose a Holiday in Zanzibar?


  • Zanzibar is renowned for its white sandy beaches, its blue ocean, its rustic charm, its entrepreneurial and fascinating people, its wildlife and its eclectic cultural history.
  • If you are a water sports enthusiast looking to do some diving or snorkeling, wind-surfing or try your hand at big game fishing then a trip to Zanzibar is an excellent option.
  • Or if you are looking for somewhere to relax on a beach and forget the Western world for a bit, again Zanzibar is a great choice.
  • If you are fiercely interested in people and want to experience a slice of a culture that is at once alien and undeniably familiar; if you are not afraid of the discomfort that catching a glimpse of a developing nation can mean, then the island certainly has a lot to offer.
  • If you would like to see some wildlife both above ground, and under the sea and are prepared to take the rough with the smooth for the privilege then consider Zanzibar.
  • If you like exceptional fresh seafood prepared for you in idyllic locations with ocean sunsets, you will enjoy Zanzibar.
  • If you are looking for a plush holiday with all Western standards upheld, easily accessible history and hassle-free shopping and clean city streets, Zanzibar is unlikely to appeal.
  • If you are looking for perfection of service then only the very top end resorts (carrying top end price tags) may prove satisfactory.
  • If you want only beauty and escape from reality, Zanzibar is unlikely to completely oblige.
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Old Jun 20, 20, 12:38 pm
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Is Tanzania open for international tourism?

Thinking of visiting in August. Serengeti seems to be a bit tough to get to, many flights to take. It does look amazing though. Thanks.
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Old Jun 21, 20, 2:12 am
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Getting to Serengeti!

Originally Posted by exc3ll View Post
Thinking of visiting in August. Serengeti seems to be a bit tough to get to, many flights to take. It does look amazing though. Thanks.
I would like to tell you that is very easy to get to SERENGETI NATIONAL PARK! ! There are so many flight to Tanzania, and the good Place to Land is in JRO, Kilimanjaro International Airport which is about 35KM from Arusha town where many Safari start, and so I advice that you overnight in Arusha.

The next day you have option to fly straight to Serengeti, and picked up from an airstrip or drive with a guide! Now it is good to add serengeti with few other National Parks which are: Tarangire, Ngorongoro and Lake Manyara! Now, You can actually Fly into Serengeti, Seronera area, and drive out back to Arusha, and then catch a returning Back flight home which means:

Option 1:
  1. Fly from your Country to Kilimanjaro International airport - Picked up from the airport and transferred to Arusha for dinner and overnight - Check KLM, QATAR......
  2. Fly to Serengeti, picked up from airstrip at 10:100am, enjoy game drive, and check in for lunch, rest for a while and continue with game drive in evening.
  3. Full day game drive in Serengeti, make sure you wake up at: 5:00am, enjoy the morning in Serengeti, and return later for dinner and overnight stay.
  4. Day 4 - Half game drive in Serengeti and move to Ngorongoro for dinner and overnight, get a room that overlooked the crater.
  5. Enjoy the game drive in Serengeti and move out and overnight in Karatu area.
  6. Enjoy game drive in Lake Manyara - overnight in Tarangire!
  7. Enjoy game drive in Tarangire and return back to Arusha for dinner and overnight stay or fly to Zanzibar.
  8. Depart back home!

Option 2:
  1. Fly from your Country to Kilimanjaro International airport - Picked up from the airport and transferred to Arusha for dinner and overnight - Check KLM, QATAR......
  2. Picked by your driver guide with lunch box to Tarangire, gave drive full day and overnight inside Tarangire National Park.
  3. Wake up early for morning game drive and move to Manyara for game drive - overnight in Lake Manyara.
  4. Driver straight to Serengeti, enroute game drive, enjoy full game drive in Serengeti overnight Serengeti.
  5. Wake up very early 5:00m for morning experience in Serengeti, enjoy full day game drive and overnight in Serengeti.
  6. Half day game drive in Serengeti move to Ngorongoro for dinner and overnight,
  7. Game drive in Ngorongoro and later return back to Arusha or fly out to Zanzibar!
  8. Depart back home!

I hope the above helps, all I can say is that it is very possible in deed!
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Old Jun 21, 20, 10:31 am
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Yes, Tanzania is Open already, and no quarantine ....
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Old Jun 21, 20, 10:39 am
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HADZABE TRIBE IN TANZANIA:

Hadza lead a stress-free, simple life without worries. Unlike us, they are not interested in materialistic possessions. Traditional Hadzabe, they live almost completely without things. They have a cooking pot, a water container, an ax – all can be wrapped in a blanket and carried around the shoulder. They sleep when they want to. Some do not sleep most of the night and doze off in the heat of the day. Dawn and dusk are the best hunting times. When they do not hunt, men often spend time in the camp, straightening arrows, twisting arches, making chords from a giraffe or impala ligaments, hammering nails into the arrowheads.

Even if they do not find food, they do not worry and remain patient with nature. They live for the moment and their only goal is survival. Maybe that’s why agriculture has never appealed to them – growing plants requires planning; the seeds are sown earlier to eat the crop in months. Domestic animals must be fed and protected long before they are ready for slaughter. It doesn’t make sense to Hadzabe. Why grow food or raise animals when it’s all ready in the bush? When they want berries, they look for a berry bush. When they want baobab fruit, they go to baobab trees. Honey is waiting for them in wild beehives. And meat, fresh, keep in the largest warehouse in the world – on their land. All you need is a moment of tracking and a well-fired arrow.


Hadza day begins early in the morning, people wake up slowly and chat at the morning bonfire. After a while, most adults leave the camp to gathering food. Women walk in groups, usually accompanied by one teenage boy who goes with them to protect them from possible violence of neighboring tribes.

Men usually linger alone or in pairs. The children remain in the camp; they play and collect food all day. Children’s games and activities often involve collecting and processing food. Children themselves collect a large percentage of their food and are also fed by family and friends. In the middle of the day, most of Hadza is resting. Regardless of whether they are in the camp or outside, they rest until the heat in the middle of the day calms down. Most camp members return before dark when evening dinner preparations begin. Preparation of a Hadzabe meal is simple – the meat is placed directly on the fire. No grill, no pan. Everyone sits densely around the fire and waits for the meat to be ready to eat. Then everyone grabs their piece of meat with their teeth and tries to cut the torn piece with a knife. The bones are crushed with stones and the marrow is sucked out. Fat is rubbed into the skin as a type of moisturizer.

Hadzabe’s bodies are often covered with dust because they rarely use baths. Hadzabe men say that they prefer their women not to take a bath – the more time between baths, the more attractive they are. Water is not considered necessary for survival and they are not looking for sources that could quench thirst or washing. A muddy, large puddle is all they need for a bath. A handful of mud is rubbed into the skin as an exfoliating agent.

Hadzabe are free people. Free of property, most social and family responsibilities. No religious restrictions. They live without a schedule, without money, without attachment to the workplace. However, their lives are extremely risky. No medical attention. Women give birth in the bush, squatting. About one-fifth of all children die in the first year of life, and almost half of all children fail to be 15 years old. They have to deal with extreme heat, frequent thirst and swarming tsetse flies and malaria-spreading mosquitoes.
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Old Jun 25, 20, 7:49 am
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Thank you for the itinerary suggestions. Will definitely try to make it to Serengeti.
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Old Jun 25, 20, 7:59 am
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Thank you and enjoy your trip!
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Old Jun 27, 20, 7:16 am
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From my experience, part of the adventure of Serengeti is the drive. Fly into JRO. On the way, stop at Arusha Coffee Lodge for a great cup of coffee and some coffee to bring home. Maybe Tanzanite Experience. Found a lovely stone for my wife which we had set by our jeweler in NYC. Stop at Lake Manyara National Park to see the tree-climbing lions. At Ngorongoro I regret that my tour operator booked a less expensive lodge which was not on the crater rim. Spend the money for the crater rim. Then drive to Serengeti. Skip the "Masai Village" experience. A total rip off and you're not getting out of there without giving them $100 or more. Rather, stop at the museum on the site where Dr Leakey found Lucy. Then drive to Serengeti. On the return, possibly fly from Serengeti to JRO. Or reverse that itinerary.

I have cancelled my 2020 travel (or rather it has been cancelled for me since South Africa, Zambia and Uganda are closed). On the advice of public health experts, epidemiologists and other professionals I would avoid travel in 2020.
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Old Jun 28, 20, 4:27 pm
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Awesome thread as this was on our radar this summer and thought no way can we get there in August or September but that appears not the case..? What type of visa restrictions or requirements are needed for US Citizens..?
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Old Jun 29, 20, 9:08 am
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Visa on entry at border. Very simple. I crossed from Kenya into Tanzania, presented passport and crisp $100 bill to immigration and the very pleasant agent processed quickly. I already had secured Kenya visa in advance from the consulate in NYC. By the way, I much preferred the Tanzanian coffee to the Kenyan coffee. But I would still definitely seek public health advice on the advisability of Aug-Sept travel.
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Old Jun 29, 20, 6:05 pm
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Great post, very instructive!

We’re going next week on an impromptus self drive safari so I’ll make sure to report on the situation there. I hope game won’t be socially distancing.

Getting there is not that difficult as ET is now flying to DAR

We are considering driving south from Arusha towards Ruaha NP. It feels like a two day drive so where would you guys recommend us to stay on the way?
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Old Jul 2, 20, 11:45 am
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Is there any trouble for Americans to get a tourist visa in Zanzibar on arrival?
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Old Jul 2, 20, 12:05 pm
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Hello!

Do not drive from Arusha to Ruaha direct, it is too tiring, why risking, and the last time I drove from Arusha to Ruaha, the last part from Iringa to Ruaha was not good, I am not sure if the road is good now - and so dont take the risk! The best place to stop for overnight is: Mikumi, and there are a lot of Hotels to stay depending with your budget, and if you think you can drive for about 920 KM then you can may be stay in Iringa (I did this with my wife but I do not recommend)! But if you reach Iringa, there are lot of options, the best place I normally stay with my wife is: Sunset Lodge and price is about $80/room - BB, cheaper options are available!

Be careful when you run into unknown Hotel:
  1. Do not stay in a lodge that is not known in good street, and do not stay in lodge for price less than $25, which is approximately Tsh 50,000/- make sure you see a written brochure or a place where it says the price.
All the best!
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