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Old Aug 22, 02, 8:53 pm   #1
 
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Where can I convert Belgian Francs?

A friend gave me a 200 Belgian Franc note and the Bank of America said that is was worth quite a bit of money, but they couldn't convert it to US$ for me. It is an orange and white banknote with a sax and a man on one side and a sax player on the other side. It says Banque Nationale de Belgique. The bank said it was worth about US$380.00.

I am 15 and this friend told me that if anyone knew how I could get US dollars for it, it would be someone on this discussion board. The money would sure go a long way for me.

Thanks for any help!
Max
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Old Aug 22, 02, 9:12 pm   #2
 
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Hi Max,

I believe that Belgium has switched over to the Euro, and opportunities to convert that bill have likely passed. My suggestion would be to call your nearest American Express office and see what they have to say.

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Old Aug 22, 02, 10:02 pm   #3
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Last I was in Belgium, it was about 40 to the $US, making a 200 franc note worth about US$5.

I believe Belgium has converted to the Euro, so the process for exchanging is probably not worth the effort.

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Old Aug 23, 02, 12:44 am   #4
 
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Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by mstoltz:
A friend gave me a 200 Belgian Franc note and the Bank of America said that is was worth quite a bit of money [...] The bank said it was worth about US$380.00.</font>
First, I would suggest getting a new bank. Now that the dual euro/national currency circulation period is over, only Belgium's National Bank will exchange BF for free. (Actually, commercial banks may do so but can charge.)

As of Jan. 1, 2003 only the National Bank will exchange old bills.

Edited to add: 200BF = €4.96 = US$ 4.80

[This message has been edited by SMessier (edited 08-23-2002).]
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Old Aug 23, 02, 5:45 am   #5
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Actually I'm quite shure that every national bank of a Euro-member country would exchange that note into an Euro note for free. In Germany the National- or Landesbank can be found in every major city.

So probably try this on your next visit to Europe?
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Old Aug 23, 02, 7:22 am   #6
 
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Trust me, Luxembourg and Belgium had the same money for years before the Euro came. 200 Belgian Francs are only 4.96 Euro. You can change them in the Central Banks of Europe and Belgium

Muerz
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Old Aug 23, 02, 9:30 am   #7
 
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hope your friend didn't have you believe that it was more than it was!!
only European currency (I think) where you'll get more US dollars than the actual currency, is £sterling!
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Old Aug 23, 02, 5:17 pm   #8
 
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i apreciate all of your help im going to try some other banks on monday and i live in dallas the money will go to my college fund and i need all the help i can get
thanks
Max
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Old Aug 23, 02, 8:16 pm   #9
 
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I was just in Belgium and tried to spend 800 francs that I had from last year. No hotels, banks or taxis would take them. They said that I had to go to the national bank. It wasn't worth the money to me, so I dumped the money in the charity bin on the airplane. 800 francs was worth slightly less than 20 euros.
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Old Aug 25, 02, 3:27 am   #10
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Interesting TRIVIA? Know what a EuroDollar is? Hint: It is NOT another name for the Euro! Answer at bottom of post.

I have Dutch, German, Belgian, French, Austrian, and Italian money - not much, $300, but when I visit the countries again, what do I do? Go all the way to the National Bank or throw the money away?

When I withdrew money from EU-member ATM's, I thought I was putting sufficient faith in the Government's backing of their money. Guess not - I can no longer spend it or exchange it(without a journey to the central bank). From what I have read, in 12 years, the old currencies will no longer be exchangeable for Euros.

I wonder how this has been allowed? Maybe that is why U.S. money is so accepted throughout the world - no matter how old, mutilated, defaced, burned, or rotted; as long as there is ANY evidence that it is a unique and genuine Treasury Note, it will be honored and/or replaced at no charge. Every note ever minted by the Treasury Dept is always good.

source:

http://www.bep.treas.gov/section.cfm/8
http://www.bep.treas.gov/section.cfm/19


ANSWER? A EuroDollar is actually a U.S. Dollar! It also can be a Canadian dollar, Hong Kong dollar, or any country's dollar;

A Eurodollar is an official term, used by foreign traders since around 1960. Any dollar traded in a foreign country is called a EuroDollar. And a Euro that is traded outside the EU-member countries would be called a EuroEuro.

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Old Aug 25, 02, 2:25 pm   #11
 
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I was recently in a non-Euro country, maybe it was New Zealand or the UK, where the currency changebooths quoted rates for the former Euroean currencies. I suppose if they pay little enough for them, they could still make money after sending the bills to the European central banks for exchange. Maybe they were just too lazy to change their rate cards. I'd check in Canada or Mexico.

A US-Dollar note won't be accepted by any bank or change booth in most of Eastern Europe if it is in the least bit torn or has a hole in it. I don't know why, and we all know that the US Federal Reserve will accept a US bill in any condition, but they must somehow think that only counterfeit bills can be torn!

[This message has been edited by Track (edited 08-25-2002).]
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Old Aug 25, 02, 6:02 pm   #12
 
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Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by RADDY1:
only European currency (I think) where you'll get more US dollars than the actual currency, is £sterling!</font>
And the Maltese Lira (aka Pound)
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Old Aug 25, 02, 6:12 pm   #13
 
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Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by Aubie:
I have Dutch, German, Belgian, French, Austrian, and Italian money - not much, $300, but when I visit the countries again, what do I do? Go all the way to the National Bank or throw the money away?
</font>
Yes - those are your choices (or give it to a charity for whom US$300 could be sufficient to save the lives of maybe ten children in Africa through vaccinations).

Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">When I withdrew money from EU-member ATM's, I thought I was putting sufficient faith in the Government's backing of their money. Guess not - I can no longer spend it or exchange it(without a journey to the central bank). From what I have read, in 12 years, the old currencies will no longer be exchangeable for Euros. </font>
It should hardly have been a surprise if you are a regular traveller to Europe. It was all agreed in principle about 7 or 8 years before the changeover happened.

Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">
I wonder how this has been allowed?
</font>
Allowed by whom? If you mean by the people, then it was "allowed" by the fact that the political parties in the relevant countries ran for election with the Euro as a key item in their manifestos. They were elected. They carried out their manifesto promises. That's how democracy works.

Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Maybe that is why U.S. money is so accepted throughout the world</font>
Dollars only tend to be accepted outside currency exchanges / banks in countries with very unstable currencies of their own. You won't get very far trying to buy something in a shop in Paris/Tokyo/Singapore/Hong Kong/UK/etc. with US Dollars.

[This message has been edited by christep (edited 08-25-2002).]
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