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Are we giving up on the book club?

Are we giving up on the book club?

Old Aug 12, 02, 3:35 pm
  #1  
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Are we giving up on the book club?

Not much discussion transpired after the first book and I'm not real clear that we even have a second book. Is this a failed effort or do we forge ahead? Or perhaps we just keep up the thread on good books we've read in case anyone's looking for suggestions? Whatcha think?
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Old Aug 12, 02, 8:38 pm
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I like the idea of keeping up the reading suggestions...

In the book club I'm in now, the person who picks the book also prepares some discussion topics... sometimes you can get these off the publishers websites even... and then the conversation starts flowing from there.

I think that the format of a bulletin board makes the normal book club type of discussion very difficult to conduct here. If we were doing it in a chat environment, it would be much easier.
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Old Aug 14, 02, 3:23 pm
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Now that I have finally finished the novel that I was reading I am ready for a new one.

I really like the idea of the book club and about giving some direct questions regarding the book.

Generally, I like to really enjoy fiction based on fact books. Such as

Ken Follett's Pillars of the Earth
Ken Follett's Night Over Water
Jeffery Archer's As the Crow Flies

Of course these wouldn't be good books for a book club because I think all of them are over 6OO pages. I was just wondering if anyone had any suggestions with books similar to these?
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Old Aug 14, 02, 11:15 pm
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Wingless, I love books over 600 pages.

I am currently reading "The Sum of All Fears" which is over 900 pages, but I think it is more of a boy book
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Old Aug 16, 02, 1:26 am
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Punki I just thought, depending how much time everyone has to read, that longer novels may make it harder to review at the same time.
I have read Tom Clancy but I am not a big spy/military novel lover which is mostly what Clancy writes.

I just finished the Alienist by Caleb Carr it was great but I didn't seem to get too motivated with it until the last 200 pages, although everyone who I have spoken to that has read it really loved it.
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Old Aug 16, 02, 1:54 pm
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<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by Punki:

I am currently reading "The Sum of All Fears" which is over 900 pages, but I think it is more of a boy book</font>
And how would you define what is a boy book from what you define as a girl book? I've never heard of such a distinction. Hmm, while we're at it, are there books which are heterosexual versus homosexual? This could turn into a rather enlightening discussion!

My favorite authors are Tom Clancy, Tom Wolfe, Mario Puzo, and Dominick Dunne. How would they be categorized?

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Old Aug 16, 02, 2:50 pm
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Forgive me for intruding on this discussion among womenfolk, but I'm trying to start a book club amongst some friends.

Some of you mentioned that you were currently in bookclubs, and I was wondering if you might have some advice about what works/doesn't work. We'll probably be having discussion in person and online.

I've never been part of a book club, so any insight you can share would be very helpful.

Thanks

d

P.S. There are "homosexual" books.

(edited for clarity)

[This message has been edited by Doppy (edited 08-16-2002).]
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Old Aug 16, 02, 3:19 pm
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<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by Analise:
And how would you define what is a boy book from what you define as a girl book? I've never heard of such a distinction. Hmm, while we're at it, are there books which are heterosexual versus homosexual? This could turn into a rather enlightening discussion!

</font>
I think there may be SOME agreement on "boy books" "chic flicks" and the like....I usually don't like these kinds of categories but in this instance I think it can be helpful...not that women like silly, frilly books and men like war books, but if someone tells me a book is full of war and spy stuff, I kinda think of that as a boy book in the most general sense. Andif its's about a woman dealing with breast cancer it tends to be a girl book...

for ex I just say Minority Report - excellent movie but definitely a masculine type of movie in my view...
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Old Aug 17, 02, 4:53 am
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Very interesting question, Analise, and one that has a rather illogical, but hopefully interesting, answer.

All my life, even as a little kid, almost everything had a gender in my mind--maybe I was supposed to have been born Spanish.

Despite spending a lot of time on a farm and seeing kittens, puppies, calves and foals born (an amazing experience for a child), cats and cows were always "girls" in my mind, and dogs and horses were always "boys", even those dogs and horses that I knew were mommies. Red, white, yellow, pink and orange were always "girl" colors and blue, green, purple, black and brown were always "boy" colors, although boys were far more likely to wear red than purple.

When I was young, girls were subtly discouraged from studying math, physics, chemistry, etc., so while I eventually conquered those subjects, they still have "boy" connotations in my mind, while cooking, sewing, art and reading have "girl" connotations in my mind. I heartily agree that none of it makes a lick of sense, but there it is.

Books, or portions of books, that focus in depth on the actual mechanics of war, murder, car/boat/airplane chases, athletic contests and weapons of destruction, (all of which I find dreadfully boring) tend to fall into the "boy" category. Books that focus on feelings, understanding, relationships, and social interactions (all of which I find very interesting) tend to be classified as "girl" books in my mind. Books that focus on sex, interestingly enough, can be "boy" or "girl" depending on their flavor, although in all honesty, sex has never held much appeal to me as a spectator sport.

Everything (including books) and everyone, in my mind, has both heterosexual and homosexual and "boy" and "girl" overtones and undertones. There is little that is exclusively black or white and that is a very good thing. I am very much into celebrating shades of gray and lots and lots of colors, although the rare example of true black or true white certainly makes for an interesting case study.

The upside of all this twisted thinking is that there are some really nasty things in life that must be done that are exclusively "boy" things in my mind, so I have no problem sitting prettily in the car checking my makeup, while applauding the brave male soul who fearlessly changes a flat in the cold, cold rain of night.
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Old Aug 17, 02, 10:50 pm
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On a more practical note, As the Crow Flies might be a nice book club read.
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Old Aug 18, 02, 7:41 pm
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<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by Punki:
Wingless, I love books over 600 pages.

I am currently reading "The Sum of All Fears" which is over 900 pages, but I think it is more of a boy book
</font>
Ahem, I enjoyed all of Clancy's works of fictions (but not the ones with co-authors).
Punki, I did not know there were boy books and girl books. Or would that be like chick flicks?
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Old Aug 19, 02, 2:43 pm
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Interesting comments, Punki. The activities, studies, and books I like clearly are the ones you labeled as "boy" when you were growing up. We had dogs in the house when I was growing up; I grew up horseback riding as a little girl; my favorite color is green; I excelled in algebra and geometry; I love books like The Godfather; I loathe touchy/feely movies; I love to participate in sports especially tennis. But trust me, I'm all girl.
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Old Aug 20, 02, 2:47 am
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Analise, I actually decided to join the Marine Corps, over the Navy, because I thought the color green (as in uniform) went better with my eyes and complexion than blue--for real. But, I also must say that I have no complaints whatsoever about being a Woman Marine restricted to base with 10,000 men and only 100 women during the difficult political times of the early 60s. I have no clue why I ended up being a police person or going to law school back in the days when those were definitely not normal girl activities. Life happens.

Out of pure stubborness, I did eventually end up taking and getting straight A's in all of those "boy" subjects in college as well and actually even really got in to calculus as a way of thinking for a while--go figure.

While I am crazy for feathers, satin, lace, make-up of all kinds, dressing up and love dearly being a girl (to the point where I am certain that if I had been born a boy that I would be a cross-dresser) but I still don't think I am all girl. I think the wonderful joy of life if that we are all a little bit of this and a little bit of that and just a little bit of something truly original.

At least I hope so.
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Old Aug 21, 02, 4:07 am
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I took statistics, calculus, economics and all the other (for me) boring classes. I was a tomboy all my life (rode motorcycles, skydiving, and surfing). Most of my friends have been male but...I love being pampered, the door being opened for me, and in general being treated like a lady.

What is great about being a woman today is that we CAN have the best of both worlds.
_____________________________________________

So...what's the next book ladies?
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Old Aug 23, 02, 1:50 am
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<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by Library Dragon:
On a more practical note, As the Crow Flies might be a nice book club read.</font>

It is one on my top 2 books I have ever read.

I couldn't put it down.
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