Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Miles&Points > Airlines and Mileage Programs > WestJet | WestJet Rewards
Reload this Page >

Free hot meals/alcoholic drinks B737 Trans-Atlantic

Free hot meals/alcoholic drinks B737 Trans-Atlantic

Old Apr 29, 2022, 4:39 pm
  #1  
Original Member
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 1998
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 1,636
Free hot meals/alcoholic drinks B737 Trans-Atlantic

Commencing in May, all transatlantic operations will receive same service on both B787 & B737 operations.
- complimentary meals/snacks
- complimentary alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages

Cabin Crew received the operational details today. A welcome offering for Guests!
FlyerJ, Symmetre, YYCCL3 and 2 others like this.

Last edited by Fisch; Apr 30, 2022 at 2:55 am
Fisch is offline  
Old Apr 30, 2022, 12:35 am
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Programs: No single airline or hotel chain is of much use to me anymore.
Posts: 3,274
It did seem a little asinine when the MAX, 767 and 787 all offered different levels of economy service when all three were operating transatlantic routes simultaneously. That feels like a lifetime ago.

I suppose when you're just going from YYT or YHZ to the UK, Ireland or barely Europe you can get away with that, departing YYZ adds some real travel time to the journeys the MAX will be operating.

I'm curious about just how big a factor the born-again long-haul narrow-body will be or if it is mostly just a product of conservative thinking on the part of airlines.
Error 601 is offline  
Old Apr 30, 2022, 7:08 am
  #3  
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: YYG
Programs: airlines and hotels and rental cars - oh my!
Posts: 2,956
Originally Posted by Error 601
I'm curious about just how big a factor the born-again long-haul narrow-body will be or if it is mostly just a product of conservative thinking on the part of airlines.
I don't think the business case for it has changed assuming demand for travel returns to something approaching pre-pandemic levels, and right now there's every indication that will be the case. Boeing has sold a ton of Max8s and Max9s, just as Airbus has found huge demand for its long range and ultra-long range A321s. Airlines certainly seem to feel the narrow-body long-haul is going to be with us for a while.

As someone increasingly based on the east coast, I'm much happier taking a narrow-body from a smaller airport like YHZ straight to Europe than flying back to YUL or YYZ to connect onto a bigger plane, something that basically doubles my travel time to England - 2 hour flight to YYZ, 2 hours in the air again heading back east, with even a bare minimum 1 hour connection it's now twice as long a slog as the direct flight would have been. Between wide-bodies and narrow-bodies the onboard experience is now similar enough that the appeal of a direct flight becomes a no-brainer.

Even from major hubs, I think the narrow-bodies have appeal by allowing direct flights to smaller European destinations and escaping those monkey-butt ugly FRA or LHR or CDG connections in what, for pax, is the middle of the night. If I never have to take a packed bus to a remote stand at FRA again, then I will be a very happy camper. So, bring on the skinny planes! I'm happy to see them.
Symmetre is offline  
Old Apr 30, 2022, 9:47 am
  #4  
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: YMJ (YQR)
Programs: Qantas LTG, WestJet Plat
Posts: 313
This is great news. A few thoughts:
  • I wonder if a desire for consistency with the Air Transat codeshare has anything to do with this - I believe meals are included on all Air Transat transatlantic flights?
  • Now the key service differences between WestJet 737 and 787 on transatlantic flights are:
    • No seatback screens on 737 (both classes)
      • Air Transat has seatback screens in both classes on the 321LRs
    • No leg rests on 737 (Premium only)
      • Air Transat Club Class seats have leg rests on the 321LRs
V1213 is online now  
Old Apr 30, 2022, 11:23 pm
  #5  
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Copenhagen
Programs: skyteam
Posts: 563
Originally Posted by V1213
This is great news. A few thoughts:
  • I wonder if a desire for consistency with the Air Transat codeshare has anything to do with this - I believe meals are included on all Air Transat transatlantic flights?
  • Now the key service differences between WestJet 737 and 787 on transatlantic flights are:
    • No seatback screens on 737 (both classes)
      • Air Transat has seatback screens in both classes on the 321LRs
    • No leg rests on 737 (Premium only)
      • Air Transat Club Class seats have leg rests on the 321LRs
Premium on 737 does not have leg rests either.

Well this a very nice announcement! Westjet has almost achieved full service carrier status. All the basic that is missing is first checked luggage transatlantic complimentary.
cirrusdragoon is offline  
Old May 1, 2022, 3:22 am
  #6  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Programs: No single airline or hotel chain is of much use to me anymore.
Posts: 3,274
Originally Posted by Symmetre
If I never have to take a packed bus to a remote stand at FRA again, then I will be a very happy camper. So, bring on the skinny planes! I'm happy to see them.
I have no objection, I rarely objected to regional jets on traditionally mainline routes - I'm just curious about the long-term commitment to the strategy industry wide. There are going to be some pretty unusual cabins on some of these new transatlantic narrow-bodies with what are probably some pretty complicated economics.
Error 601 is offline  
Old May 1, 2022, 6:50 am
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: YYG
Programs: airlines and hotels and rental cars - oh my!
Posts: 2,956
Agreed, but I admit, I do like the idea of lie-flat seats in a 321.
Symmetre is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

This site is owned, operated, and maintained by MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Designated trademarks are the property of their respective owners.