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Medical cover for returning US expats

Medical cover for returning US expats

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Old Feb 27, 19, 10:52 am
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Medical cover for returning US expats

A married retired Californian couple, we’ve been living abroad past 18 years but want to live back in the US. What options do we have for medical cover and prescription charges?
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Old Feb 27, 19, 10:54 am
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Medicare?
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Old Mar 2, 19, 8:34 am
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You can go to www.healthcare.gov and find a plan. You will need to make an account. The plans are dependent on the zip code you will be living in. Since you are moving back to the States you can qualify even though it is not open enrollment. depending on your age the plans can be expensive but will cover all pre-existing conditions. You usually can add dental and often vision coverage after you pick the medical plan.

Another option is to buy a plan on the "open market". These will be much cheaper but will have pre-existing condition clauses ( they won't cover anything you seen a doctor for in x number of months or are currently being treated for). The pre-existing conditions clause can be as short as six months or as long as two years, meaning the plan will not cover any per-existing conditions during that time period. If you go this route do not lie on the applications because it can void the entire policy.

If you are at the 65 age then you should have already enrolled in medicare and it will cover you and all the above is moot.
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Old Mar 2, 19, 8:39 am
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Also for prescriptions download the GoodRx app or use the website. This can often give better prices than any insurance coverage. You can always use GoodRx and pay out of pocket, jeep the receipts, and apply them to any deductible if you need.
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Old May 9, 19, 7:42 am
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Medical cover for returning US expats

Depending upon the country where you are yielding to relish and work, policies are ready for a period of one to 11 months in the event of illness or injury. Such security policies also serve to shield you financially should you need medical care, hospitalizations, emergency room visits, or even surgery.
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Old May 9, 19, 8:18 am
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If you are aged 65 or above you should be able to enroll in Medicare. If you have not contributed for 40 quarters while working in the US then you will have to pay a premium (probably about $500 per month) for Part A as well as the Part B premium. You would also need a supplementary policy and/or Part D and would thus need to evaluate how the total compares with alternatives. I don't know how the standard policies deal with someone who is 65 and not enrolled in Medicare.
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Old May 14, 19, 2:22 pm
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Originally Posted by MADPhil View Post
If you are aged 65 or above you should be able to enroll in Medicare. If you have not contributed for 40 quarters while working in the US then you will have to pay a premium (probably about $500 per month) for Part A as well as the Part B premium. You would also need a supplementary policy and/or Part D and would thus need to evaluate how the total compares with alternatives. I don't know how the standard policies deal with someone who is 65 and not enrolled in Medicare.
Some countries (a small but material minority) have totalization agreements with the US, and so the 40 need not all be in the US.
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Old May 14, 19, 4:17 pm
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post
Some countries (a small but material minority) have totalization agreements with the US, and so the 40 need not all be in the US.
This is the relevant page for SS: https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/international.html. I knew it worked the other way for the UK and I guess it is logical that it is reciprocal. Medicare doesn't seem to have anything that can readily be found and it is a different program with its own premium but may well have a similar rule. The qualification for medical care in countries like the UK is, of course, quite different than for a pension.
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