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I Don't NEED a Passport - I'm American!

I Don't NEED a Passport - I'm American!

Old Oct 11, 12, 3:09 pm
  #46  
 
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I always carry my passport when I'm outside the US (except non-air travel to Canada and Mexico).

In Europe the border guard on the train platform in Switzerland (arriving from Italy) ws checking passports. I gave her my US passport card and that was sufficient for her. They weren't stamping anything or using a computer.
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Old Oct 11, 12, 3:51 pm
  #47  
 
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Originally Posted by vaillancourt View Post
Do you need a passport if you are travelling between two countries that you are citizen of? For example, could a US citizen travel to the UK without passport if he is also a UK citizen? Technically none of the two countries could deny that person entry...
The problem would be two-fold. One would be gaining access to the plane in the first place without a passport. The other would be proving one's citizenship at the other end. In fact, the British authorities maintain that the only way of demonstrating that one has the right of abode in the UK at a British port of entry is to provide "a UK passport describing one as a British citizen or a British subject with the right of abode, or a certificate of entitlement to the right of abode in the UK, which has been issued by the UK government or on its behalf" (this latter being affixed in a non-British citizen passport that is validly held).

So even if one could convince the immigration authorities at the port of entry that one was a British citizen, it would clearly take a long time and probably be difficult. (There used to be stories of people being admitted with driving licences, library cards, school report cards and all sorts of other things, but I think those days are past.)
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Old Oct 11, 12, 5:20 pm
  #48  
 
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Originally Posted by Christopher View Post
(There used to be stories of people being admitted with driving licences, library cards, school report cards and all sorts of other things, but I think those days are past.)
Not just stories... in 1979 my (now) husband returned to the UK from the Faroe Islands using nothing more than a Girobank cheque guarantee card. I can vouch for it because I was with him. I guess they must have concluded that you can't possibly fake a Scouse accent...

I'm sure he wouldn't be able to do it now - and that's not just because he's lost his Scouse accent!
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Old Oct 11, 12, 5:24 pm
  #49  
 
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Originally Posted by Aviatrix View Post
Not just stories... in 1979 my (now) husband returned to the UK from the Faroe Islands using nothing more than a Girobank cheque guarantee card. I can vouch for it because I was with him. I guess they must have concluded that you can't possibly fake a Scouse accent...

I'm sure he wouldn't be able to do it now - and that's not just because he's lost his Scouse accent!
I was admitted to the US based on my drivers license and social security card back in the 90's (due my passport being stuck in government shut down hell). However, I think it's different getting admitted to a country you are a citizen of, and getting admitted to a country that you are visiting. I would be surprised if anyone in the last 40-50 years had been admitted to a country that they didn't have citizenship to without a passport.
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Old Oct 11, 12, 5:27 pm
  #50  
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So this is the opposite of the FT thread when someone asked if he needs a passport to go to Hawaii?
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Old Oct 11, 12, 5:27 pm
  #51  
 
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Originally Posted by DillMan View Post
So? It is their responsibility to do a *simple google* before they pack up for a multi-week vacation.

I guess my love of personal accountability doesn't agree with your liberalism.
Not to turn this into an OMNI/PR discussion (and I note the so I'm taking this as a friendly 'jab'), but....

I agree that the sole responsibility for this mishap lies with the traveling couple; I believe (hope) that that was clear in my post. But that doesn't preclude my feeling a twinge of liberal pain - NOT GUILT - for someone caught in a bad situation, even one of their own making. People make mistakes and sometimes behave badly; I know I have and there's often more to a story than meets the eye. Sometimes it's not an easy "black or white" call - even when, superficially, it appears so. That's what I meant when I mentioned my "bleeding heart liberalism." Liberalism and personal responsibility are, for me, not in conflict with each other.

Just to include some on topic* content, I hope that the couple managed to salvage their trip. I also hope they apologized for their outburst.

*is OT read as "on topic" or "off topic?" I can never keep this straight.
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Old Oct 11, 12, 5:43 pm
  #52  
 
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Originally Posted by DillMan View Post
So? It is their responsibility to do a *simple google* before they pack up for a multi-week vacation.
Why would they Google it if it didn't occur to them that it would possibly be a requirement? They might if they were unsure, but in this case, they were sure (and just happened to be mistaken). Consider the case in the other thread about passports to Hawaii. Do most US citizens Google passport requirements to Hawaii before planning a multi-week vacation there? No, they don't, because they know it's not required - why would it even occur to them to double-check? The couple in the OP were in the same situation (except obviously that they were wrong).
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Old Oct 11, 12, 5:49 pm
  #53  
 
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Originally Posted by vaillancourt View Post
Do you need a passport if you are travelling between two countries that you are citizen of? For example, could a US citizen travel to the UK without passport if he is also a UK citizen? Technically none of the two countries could deny that person entry...
In addition to the practical matters regarding the airline accepting you for travel (e.g. how would they know you're a UK citizen and thus entitled to entry upon arrival if you do not present a UK passport), you also have the matters of a) US law requires all departing air passengers to have passports, and b) US law requires US citizens to have their US passports on their person when they depart, even if it's not the one they use to check in with.
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Old Oct 11, 12, 6:30 pm
  #54  
 
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Interesting thread.

I do a ton of domestic (Canadian) travel and I'd say 90%+ of the people in line around me show their passport as ID - although there is absolutely no need to. Quite the dichotomy between cultures.
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Old Oct 11, 12, 7:33 pm
  #55  
 
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I use my US passport even when traveling outside of the state. It's much more convenient and legit when you need it for age or Identity verification than a license that looks like it could have been faked. Happens a lot when I was visiting Cali. People generally don't question the validity of a US passport.
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Old Oct 11, 12, 7:35 pm
  #56  
 
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Originally Posted by DevilsX View Post
I use my US passport even when traveling outside of the state. It's much more convenient and legit when you need it for age or Identity verification than a license that looks like it could have been faked. Happens a lot when I was visiting Cali. People generally don't question the validity of a US passport.
I totally disagree with this. I find that LOTS of Americans have no idea what a passport is and don't treat it as real ID. I found this to be particularly the case in Illinois (where I grew up). It's probably far more common in flyover country than the coasts or anyplace where there are lots of immigrants and people who travel.
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Old Oct 11, 12, 7:48 pm
  #57  
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Originally Posted by CPRich View Post
Come visit me, you can hit both Moon and Mars with nothing but your US DL.





Originally Posted by M60_to_LGA View Post
I find that LOTS of Americans have no idea what a passport is and don't treat it as real ID.
I use my passport card everywhere for ID. I can't remember the last time it was questioned as valid.
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Old Oct 11, 12, 8:16 pm
  #58  
 
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Originally Posted by M60_to_LGA View Post
I totally disagree with this. I find that LOTS of Americans have no idea what a passport is and don't treat it as real ID. I found this to be particularly the case in Illinois (where I grew up). It's probably far more common in flyover country than the coasts or anyplace where there are lots of immigrants and people who travel.
Never had a problem with it for the past 4-5 years. But you could be right with places where people don't travel much.
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Old Oct 11, 12, 8:42 pm
  #59  
 
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Originally Posted by N965VJ View Post







I use my passport card everywhere for ID. I can't remember the last time it was questioned as valid.
At JFK T3 DL the TSA gate checker asked if I had a driver's license instead of the Passport card. He handled it like he had never seen one. I told him no and he turned it over about 3 times before stating his head and signing my BP.

I sent a complaint to the TSA, the ID checker should know the top 5 on the TSA ID list on their website.
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Old Oct 11, 12, 8:42 pm
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I think my empathy results from knowing that I am not immune to doing stupid things, even if I would never do this particular stupid thing. Of course they should not berate the staff--that tends to reduce my empathy.
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