Official Ask The Flight Attendant Thread!

 

Old May 18, 08, 1:03 pm
  #31  
 
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Originally Posted by flight62 View Post
An A319 is flying from MEX-CLT. Rare as it may be, there are no English speaking passengers. The flight is oversold. US Airways must allow Spanish speaking passengers in the exit row because 10 seats would go out open and 10 customers would be pumped in what would now be an oversell. TRUE or FALSE?

I'll let this ride a few days before answering.
False, I think. I believe all emergency exit row passengers must be able to speak and understand English and the spoken directions given by the crew.
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Old May 18, 08, 5:40 pm
  #32  
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Originally Posted by flight62 View Post
You bid for your schedule. The schedules (lines of time) vary in the amount of time flown. One line may be worth 77 hours, one line may be worth 84 hours. That's flight hours. Some f/a's fly as little has they have to. Some fly a lot because of whatever reason. I generally fly about 85 hours a month.
Sorry, I'm still not getting it. When I bid for something at, for example, an auction, I'm offering a certain amount of money for an item or whatever. I can be outbid by someone who offers more money. So, when you say your bidding for your schedule, what are the 'units' you're bidding? Can you be outbid for a schedule? Or does it really just go by seniority and you get the schedule for which you've bid and you're most senior?

Is there a certain set amount of hours you need to fly each month? Or is it as much as you want to make the money you need?

I did actually know that the FA's don't technically clock hours until the door closes (from FT!), but I'd assume that's included to a certain extent in your hourly wage. As an academic, I only get paid for about 50% of the hours I work.

Finally, I'll go with FALSE, too, since the FAR require that exit row pax, among other things, be able to understand verbal commands in the language used by the crew, which, I assume, is English on US Airways.

Thanks again!
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Old May 18, 08, 5:50 pm
  #33  
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Originally Posted by dstan View Post
Sorry, I'm still not getting it.
Thanks again!
As Suzanne Sugarbaker from Designing Women once said, "You think too much!" Bidding is just another way of saying putting in for your schedule of choice. Yes, seniority rules and your lines of time (schedules) are rewarded based on that.
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Old May 18, 08, 6:04 pm
  #34  
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Originally Posted by flight62 View Post
As Suzanne Sugarbaker from Designing Women once said, "You think too much!" Bidding is just another way of saying putting in for your schedule of choice. Yes, seniority rules and your lines of time (schedules) are rewarded based on that.
Gotcha, thanks!
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Old May 18, 08, 7:14 pm
  #35  
 
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Originally Posted by me4yankees View Post
Thank you! Your work will be rewarded!
Yes flight92, thank you! I filled in my A&B already. Not going to the office that often but I will make an effort

I mean flight62 typos galore.
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Old May 18, 08, 8:30 pm
  #36  
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Originally Posted by flight62 View Post
Are you a customer with your own wheelchair? Afraid of it getting lost or damaged when it is gate checked?

If you do not want to place your wheelchair below, the airline is required to place it onboard. It will go on top of the seats in the last row of the a/c right side. There is a tarp that is placed on the seat and around the wheelchair. The chair is strapped in with seat belts and an extension.

Don't forget it you ever need to go to the bathroom, there is an onboard wheelchair provided.
An onboard wheelchair is only required to be provided on aircraft with more than 60 seats. Occasionally the onboard wheelchair is not, in fact, on board, or is non-functional. I recommend asking a crew member to check after boarding but before take-off.

(Not a flight attendant, nor do I play one on TV, but I do use the OBWC)
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Old May 18, 08, 8:50 pm
  #37  
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Originally Posted by Katja View Post
An onboard wheelchair is only required to be provided on aircraft with more than 60 seats. Occasionally the onboard wheelchair is not, in fact, on board, or is non-functional. I recommend asking a crew member to check after boarding but before take-off.

(Not a flight attendant, nor do I play one on TV, but I do use the OBWC)
Sorry for the confusion. I thought I stated for mainline US Airways. The on board wheelchair should always be on the aircraft. An airline could get fined AND a passenger needing that wheelchair could sue the company for violating the Disabilities Act.
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Old May 18, 08, 8:56 pm
  #38  
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Originally Posted by flight62 View Post
Sorry for the confusion. I thought I stated for mainline US Airways. The on board wheelchair should always be on the aircraft. An airline could get fined AND a passenger needing that wheelchair could sue the company for violating the Disabilities Act.
Totally my fault for not reading the whole thread and seeing the qualification.

Yes, the onboard wheelchair should always be on board, but it doesn't hurt to check because stuff happens.

(And it's the Air Carrier Access Act, not the Americans with Disabilities Act.)
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Old May 18, 08, 10:23 pm
  #39  
 
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I'm going to let this ride as well since I know the answer hehe
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Old May 19, 08, 6:22 am
  #40  
 
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Originally Posted by flight62 View Post
An A319 is flying from MEX-CLT. Rare as it may be, there are no English speaking passengers. The flight is oversold. US Airways must allow Spanish speaking passengers in the exit row because 10 seats would go out open and 10 customers would be pumped in what would now be an oversell. TRUE or FALSE?
I would think it should be false based on the requirement to read and understand English. However, since this seems to make sense, I'm going to say true. I'm thinking there is probably some "loophole" so that they can fill the plane especially considering how rare this would be.
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Old May 19, 08, 6:35 am
  #41  
 
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Originally Posted by USPhilly View Post
I would think it should be false based on the requirement to read and understand English. However, since this seems to make sense, I'm going to say true. I'm thinking there is probably some "loophole" so that they can fill the plane especially considering how rare this would be.
If there is a loophole, it would be that the crew speaks, reads, and understands Spanish.

I still think that since US Airways is an American carrier with an English-speaking crew, the exit row passengers must be able to speak, read, and understand English. They are supposed to read the seatback card, be able to follow oral commands given by the crew, and give the FA a verbal yes (In English, I think!) that they understand their responsibility.
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Old May 19, 08, 6:45 am
  #42  
 
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If those of us who enjoy wine in a real glass bring on own on-board will/can you use it?

What's the one thing you get asked alot that really annoys you?

What requests do the really savvy pax make that most don't know about?

btw, I echo want others have already said: great idea for a thread
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Old May 19, 08, 12:55 pm
  #43  
 
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I would still think that those in the exit row would need to speak and understand English. Interesting question!
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Old May 19, 08, 2:11 pm
  #44  
 
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I think FAA requires knowledge of English (at least on domestic flight). Since this is international I don't know. My bet is that English is not universal requirement on all airlines (since for many English is not first language).
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Old May 19, 08, 4:10 pm
  #45  
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One more day.

Originally Posted by safetymom View Post
I would still think that those in the exit row would need to speak and understand English. Interesting question!
I'll give the answer tomorrow.
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