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UA Cancels Reservation for No Rational Reason

UA Cancels Reservation for No Rational Reason

 
Old Nov 1, 06, 10:24 pm
  #1  
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UA Cancels Reservation for No Rational Reason

I thought I'd seen everything. Well check this out.

We are holding 4 FC tickets PDX-SFO continuing SFO-SYD. Confirmed and ticketed. They are award tickets but per UA Tariff are to be treated the same as paid.

UA changes the aircraft on the short PDX-SFO leg to a commuter without FC and then without calling us or notifying us in any way (I provided my email, fax, cell phone and am signed up for alerts) cancels our SFO-SYD reservation, rebooks us PDX-LAX-SYD.

No big deal right? Well wrong. The connection in LAX is tight, the flight is an hour longer and we were never given the chance to decide if this is what we wanted or if we would have preferred to stay with the existing routing and travel the domestic leg in coach (which is what we would have done).

Oh but it gets better.

I call res and work my way as high as I can as a million miler flyer and it turns out they have resold the tickets for a fare of between $12-14,000 each (the agent can see this). Hmmm.

They offer to try and get our seats back but so far no luck. In the meantime I am wondering what kind of people do such a thing? Is it really policy to cancel a reservation without notification (res confirms none was sent)? Is this deliberate or a bug that needs to be fixed?

Res say to call customer service. I do and they say, no way this is a res issue. We are not going to do a thing. You can file a complaint but we will take no action.

Back to res. They say that it isn't their problem. Round and round we go.

So UA is so utter screwed up that either

1) it is their policy to unilateraly cancel transcontinental flights and reroute just because a short domestic flight has no first without giving the option to downgrade nor any notification or

2) it is not policy (which is what res says and has noted as such) but their systems do it anyway and there isn't a soul in the company who seems interested in fixing the problem.

So now because they couldn't be bothered to program their systems to generate a call or email my wife (who is a doctor) has to call an afternoon's worth of patients and reschedule them which she isn't paid for and which th patients love since some travel hours to get here and have waited weeks or more to see her. Then she has to work the extra time she is now sitting on the plane and in the airport (because we have to take an earlier flight to avoid the short connect in LAX and now get a long one).

Precious.

I've been flying UA since the mid 70's and they really have outdone themselves this time. For heavens sake you would think having screwed over 4 FC ticket holders one of whom was a 1k flyer before 1k even existed they would at least pick up the phone when asked to. Nope.

And they wonder why they went bankrupt.
sbedelman is offline  
Old Nov 1, 06, 10:27 pm
  #2  
 
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that stinks...but I am not surprised. I've had "interesting" reroutings on reward tickets since UA's BK11.
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Old Nov 1, 06, 10:54 pm
  #3  
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[Quote of and response to now-deleted off-topic post removed by the moderator]

Back on topic, they probably thought they were doing you a favor by keeping you in an "all F" routing which is what 80% of people would want. But they should have held the other space, called you to confirm whether you wanted it, and then dealt with it that way, not giving up your original space until that time.

Last edited by cblaisd; Nov 1, 06 at 11:25 pm
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Old Nov 1, 06, 11:19 pm
  #4  
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Originally Posted by Eastbay1K
[now-deleted material in response to a deleted off-topic post removed by the moderator]

Back on topic, they probably thought they were doing you a favor by keeping you in an "all F" routing which is what 80% of people would want. But they should have held the other space, called you to confirm whether you wanted it, and then dealt with it that way, not giving up your original space until that time.
That is exactly what I think. And what has happened in the past. Unfortunately they claim this is an automated process now and the system has been programmed to reroute you whether you want it or not.

Best case this is just a programming error in that whoever set it up to do this either didn't know what is supposed to happen or never considered the case of a short feeder flight totally messing up a much longer one. Combine that with a failure to notify and you have a recipe for disaster.

Not a great situation but the real screw up is that there is no one home. UA simply has no process, none, to address a problem when it comes up. Even the most senior agent has no way to get to someone to let them know something like this is going on. And that isn't an accident, it's by design.

And that is the pity. They are going to lose me not so much because they screwed up my tickets (though I'm not happy) but because they don't give a damn.

A rational organization would have had the res agent flag the problem, flag me as a million miler and had someone in a position of authority call me. A somewhat rational one would have done the same when I asked. It takes are really, really stupid one to be so messed up that they refuse to call even when their own agents say the airlines rules appear to have been violated.

That is a recipe to not only lose a customer but gain a lawsuit.

BTW this isn't my first such experience. We were downgraded on LH metal from F to C when LH discontinued F out of PDX. I asked to be rerouted via SFO and was refused. I have since found that LH and UA rules both required that the reroute be offered as does applicable EU law.

Despite all that I was on the phone to a UA representative today (still trying to resolve this) who told me the airline had no obligation to reroute. I couldn't believe it. This person by their own admission has never read the applicable documents but is stating with authority information that is completely wrong.

Frankly its a pretty nutty way to run a business in my opinion. Customers forgive mistakes in organization they trust and respect (as I did UA for many, many years). But once they feel they are being taken advantage of they don't feel so inclined.

My impression is this isn't poor training. They know what the tariffs say and they are deliberately ignoring them. Anyone looking for proof need look no further than the last months Conde Nast Traveler Ombudsman column.

Last edited by cblaisd; Nov 1, 06 at 11:26 pm
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Old Nov 1, 06, 11:22 pm
  #5  
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A friend and I recently traveled round-trip from Denver to Honolulu on United Airlines, connecting through Los Angeles. We had each purchased first-class seats using 60,000 frequent-flier miles. On the return leg of the trip, our flight from Los Angeles to Denver was canceled. The airline automatically placed us on the next available flight to Denver but downgraded us to coach. Since we had paid for first-class seats, I assumed that we would receive mileage credit because we'd been reassigned to coach.

Back home, I called the customer service department of United Mileage Plus (the airline's frequent-flier program). The agent said that I needed to call United reservations. I did, and was thenceforth caught up in a game of telephone Ping-Pong in which I was shuttled between the two departments. Eventually, I got through to a reservations supervisor, who instructed me to send him the Los Angeles–Denver boarding passes and a letter of explanation. Once he received these, he assured me, the mileage credit would be posted to our accounts. I did just as he instructed, but three weeks later we each received a letter stating that United was denying us compensation because "the records indicate this was an award ticket or a fare which is not eligible for Mileage Plus credit."

At about the same time, I got a letter from a customer service representative saying that since award tickets are issued only for round-trip itineraries, I would not be credited miles for portions of flights that were downgraded. This directly contradicted what the supervisor had stated earlier, so I contacted Mileage Plus customer service again to inquire about a credit. The representative reiterated everything that had already been explained in the letters, and then added that the gate agents in Los Angeles should have given us compensation at the time of the downgrade. Yet when we showed the gate agents our first-class boarding passes and made it clear that we were being downgraded, they said nothing.

This seems like a poor way to treat first-class passengers. We paid for first-class travel but didn't get it. Isn't it only reasonable that we should receive some mileage credit?
Steven Coppola
Denver, Colorado

Ombudsman is inclined to agree, especially after examining United's Mileage Plus rules, which are posted online. These state that "travel on Mileage Plus award tickets will be subject to the…contract of carriage…of the carrier on which travel is scheduled," and United's contract of carriage states that "if space is only available and used on a UA flight(s) of a lower class of service acceptable to the passenger, UA will provide a refund of the difference of fares." This wording suggests that Coppola and his friend were due some sort of compensation. We contacted the airline for its feedback.

In a rather hostile response, a United representative explained that while Coppola and his companion were not actually entitled to have miles credited to their accounts, the carrier would work with them to reach an agreement. Eventually, United refunded each of them 5,000 miles, which it posted to their Mileage Plus accounts—without any explanation to Coppola or Ombudsman. Ombudsman is satisfied with, though puzzled by, the airline's impulsive gesture.

Equally puzzling was the United representative's explanation of why the travelers were not eligible for compensation. We were told that although Coppola's itinerary comprised four flights, the airline considered it to be two segments: Denver–Honolulu and Honolulu–Denver. Since only one of the four flights was downgraded—not an entire segment—Coppola was due nothing, despite the terms in United's contract of carriage. So the 5,000-mile credit was not a refund based on airline policy but a conciliatory gesture. Ombudsman tried to obtain an explanation of how the airline arrived at this amount, but our repeated requests received no response from the United representative.

Under slightly different circumstances, Coppola's right to compensation would have been more clear-cut. If an entire segment had been downgraded, he would have been owed recompense. If he were bumped to coach for all four flights, he would have been reimbursed the difference in mileage between the first-class and the coach-class award tickets (25,000 miles). Ombudsman also contacted American Airlines and Continental to see how their policies compared with United's. Both carriers said that the scenario described by Coppola is very rare and thus would be dealt with on a case-by-case basis. The spokesperson for American added that if a passenger were bumped to a lower class as a result of something the airline had done (a canceled or overbooked flight, for instance), the carrier would provide restitution. (Note, though, that certain itineraries require a connection or flight on a small aircraft that has no premium cabin. In this case, a passenger with a first-class award ticket will still be charged the full first-class amount of miles—since other flights in the trip will be flown first-class and award tickets are based on complete round-trip itineraries. An airline agent should advise the passenger of this prior to any ticket purchase.)

Some may wonder whether Coppola's difficulty in obtaining compensation stemmed from the fact that he was traveling on a frequent-flier ticket. The answer is no. Award tickets do afford passengers the same rights as paid tickets. Though it is true that they do not have a cash value, they grant equal rights to a seat and are governed by the same regulations as a purchased ticket: the conditions or contract of carriage. This means that passengers flying on award tickets should be due compensation if they are bumped down a class or off a flight completely, just as normal ticketholders would be. Having paid an airline (in miles) for a specific level of service, a passenger should expect to receive that level of service. But as Coppola might argue, the theory is not always put into practice.
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Old Nov 1, 06, 11:28 pm
  #6  
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Off-topic posts have been deleted.

There are numerous other threads to discuss UA's bankruptcy status/history/etc.

Thanks,

cblaisd
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Old Nov 2, 06, 5:14 am
  #7  
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My first response to the OP is that you are a Million Miler and burning your miles, that's great - but how much actual purchased flying are you doing with UA these days? The airline, correctly IMO, is more focused on current customers than past ones so waving that around isn't likely to get you anywhere unless it's accompanied by current status, as well. Also, how did you handle the discussion with the CSRs? You seem a bit belligerent and frustrated in your posts, are you approaching the discussions in the same way? That is just a recipe for trouble and unlikely to get you any satisfaction.

Were you checking the status of your itinerary regularly on UAL.Com? If so, when that little red type shows up you need to call immediately, did you? Did they tell you when the schedule change occurred versus when you first found out? and how did you find out? Is the contact info you mention in your UA MP profile or actually associated with the itinerary in question?

Last, the comment about they sold "your" award seats is a lot of bs -- the call center reps have no idea whose seats are which and it's unlikely the cabin is sold out before travel day.
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Old Nov 2, 06, 7:11 am
  #8  
 
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Originally Posted by sbedelman

That is a recipe to not only lose a customer but gain a lawsuit..
Let me get this straight: do you really believe that you can sue United on this one? because they re-routed your PDX-SYD flight in order to keep you in first class all the way??

I am not questioning here the (lack of) CS of United- it's cr#p and we all know it, but a lawsuit?? I dare you to do it.

And please keep us posted

Good luck. You'll need it...
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Old Nov 2, 06, 9:23 am
  #9  
 
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Originally Posted by sbedelman
No big deal right? Well wrong. The connection in LAX is tight, the flight is an hour longer and we were never given the chance to decide if this is what we wanted or if we would have preferred to stay with the existing routing and travel the domestic leg in coach (which is what we would have done).
I'm not sure I follow the issue here. I see that the only CRJ flight PDXSFO is the one that leaves @ 6PM (must be this flight because it's the only CRJ). The overall travel time via LAX is actually shorter (PDXLAX--a B757--leaves @ 636P and you get into SYD only 15 minutes later). True, the connection time is shorter @ 1h30m vs 2h30m via SFO, but I'm not sure I would call 1.5 hours 'tight'. You also were able to keep FC all the way.

Since the PDXLAX flight leaves only 30 minutes later, I don't follow your argument about your wife having to reschedule patients. You leave 30 minutes later (hardly anything worth having to reschedule over--if anything, it gives your wife more time incase any appts are running late).

UA has to reschedule if the new times are out of whack. But you leave 30 minutes later and get in 15 minutes later. That is not a material difference.

Did I miss something?
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Old Nov 2, 06, 10:05 am
  #10  
 
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Originally Posted by sbedelman
A friend and I recently traveled round-trip from Denver to Honolulu on United Airlines, connecting through Los Angeles. We had each purchased first-class seats using 60,000 frequent-flier miles. On the return leg of the trip, our flight from Los Angeles to Denver was canceled. The airline automatically placed us on the next available flight to Denver but downgraded us to coach. Since we had paid for first-class seats, I assumed that we would receive mileage credit because we'd been reassigned to coach.

Back home, I called the customer service department of United Mileage Plus (the airline's frequent-flier program). The agent said that I needed to call United reservations. I did, and was thenceforth caught up in a game of telephone Ping-Pong in which I was shuttled between the two departments. Eventually, I got through to a reservations supervisor, who instructed me to send him the Los Angeles–Denver boarding passes and a letter of explanation. Once he received these, he assured me, the mileage credit would be posted to our accounts. I did just as he instructed, but three weeks later we each received a letter stating that United was denying us compensation because "the records indicate this was an award ticket or a fare which is not eligible for Mileage Plus credit."

At about the same time, I got a letter from a customer service representative saying that since award tickets are issued only for round-trip itineraries, I would not be credited miles for portions of flights that were downgraded. This directly contradicted what the supervisor had stated earlier, so I contacted Mileage Plus customer service again to inquire about a credit. The representative reiterated everything that had already been explained in the letters, and then added that the gate agents in Los Angeles should have given us compensation at the time of the downgrade. Yet when we showed the gate agents our first-class boarding passes and made it clear that we were being downgraded, they said nothing.

This seems like a poor way to treat first-class passengers. We paid for first-class travel but didn't get it. Isn't it only reasonable that we should receive some mileage credit?
Steven Coppola
Denver, Colorado

Ombudsman is inclined to agree, especially after examining United's Mileage Plus rules, which are posted online. These state that "travel on Mileage Plus award tickets will be subject to the…contract of carriage…of the carrier on which travel is scheduled," and United's contract of carriage states that "if space is only available and used on a UA flight(s) of a lower class of service acceptable to the passenger, UA will provide a refund of the difference of fares." This wording suggests that Coppola and his friend were due some sort of compensation. We contacted the airline for its feedback.

In a rather hostile response, a United representative explained that while Coppola and his companion were not actually entitled to have miles credited to their accounts, the carrier would work with them to reach an agreement. Eventually, United refunded each of them 5,000 miles, which it posted to their Mileage Plus accounts—without any explanation to Coppola or Ombudsman. Ombudsman is satisfied with, though puzzled by, the airline's impulsive gesture.

Equally puzzling was the United representative's explanation of why the travelers were not eligible for compensation. We were told that although Coppola's itinerary comprised four flights, the airline considered it to be two segments: Denver–Honolulu and Honolulu–Denver. Since only one of the four flights was downgraded—not an entire segment—Coppola was due nothing, despite the terms in United's contract of carriage. So the 5,000-mile credit was not a refund based on airline policy but a conciliatory gesture. Ombudsman tried to obtain an explanation of how the airline arrived at this amount, but our repeated requests received no response from the United representative.

Under slightly different circumstances, Coppola's right to compensation would have been more clear-cut. If an entire segment had been downgraded, he would have been owed recompense. If he were bumped to coach for all four flights, he would have been reimbursed the difference in mileage between the first-class and the coach-class award tickets (25,000 miles). Ombudsman also contacted American Airlines and Continental to see how their policies compared with United's. Both carriers said that the scenario described by Coppola is very rare and thus would be dealt with on a case-by-case basis. The spokesperson for American added that if a passenger were bumped to a lower class as a result of something the airline had done (a canceled or overbooked flight, for instance), the carrier would provide restitution. (Note, though, that certain itineraries require a connection or flight on a small aircraft that has no premium cabin. In this case, a passenger with a first-class award ticket will still be charged the full first-class amount of miles—since other flights in the trip will be flown first-class and award tickets are based on complete round-trip itineraries. An airline agent should advise the passenger of this prior to any ticket purchase.)

Some may wonder whether Coppola's difficulty in obtaining compensation stemmed from the fact that he was traveling on a frequent-flier ticket. The answer is no. Award tickets do afford passengers the same rights as paid tickets. Though it is true that they do not have a cash value, they grant equal rights to a seat and are governed by the same regulations as a purchased ticket: the conditions or contract of carriage. This means that passengers flying on award tickets should be due compensation if they are bumped down a class or off a flight completely, just as normal ticketholders would be. Having paid an airline (in miles) for a specific level of service, a passenger should expect to receive that level of service. But as Coppola might argue, the theory is not always put into practice.
BTW, someone else already posted regarding this issue a long time ago.
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Old Nov 2, 06, 10:10 am
  #11  
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Originally Posted by GoingAway
My first response to the OP is that you are a Million Miler and burning your miles, that's great - but how much actual purchased flying are you doing with UA these days? The airline, correctly IMO, is more focused on current customers than past ones so waving that around isn't likely to get you anywhere unless it's accompanied by current status, as well. Also, how did you handle the discussion with the CSRs? You seem a bit belligerent and frustrated in your posts, are you approaching the discussions in the same way? That is just a recipe for trouble and unlikely to get you any satisfaction.

Were you checking the status of your itinerary regularly on UAL.Com? If so, when that little red type shows up you need to call immediately, did you? Did they tell you when the schedule change occurred versus when you first found out? and how did you find out? Is the contact info you mention in your UA MP profile or actually associated with the itinerary in question?

Last, the comment about they sold "your" award seats is a lot of bs -- the call center reps have no idea whose seats are which and it's unlikely the cabin is sold out before travel day.
Good comments. Let me address them one by one as they are very insightful.

My first response to the OP is that you are a Million Miler and burning your miles, that's great - but how much actual purchased flying are you doing with UA these days?

Not much. I'm retired now.

The airline, correctly IMO, is more focused on current customers than past ones so waving that around isn't likely to get you anywhere unless it's accompanied by current status, as well.

Point well taken. But the airline and myself do have an agreement. Just because I haven't bought a car from BMW in a while doesn't mean when I do they can telll me they aren't going to honor the warranty.

Even UA believes the cancellation and reroute violated the Conditions of Carriage. One would think that would be something of concern to them in that they have a legal if not moral obligation to live up to their agreement.

One would think they would want to get to the bottom of that if for no other reason that it doesn't keep happening. That they are unwilling to give even their most senior agents the ability to contact someone in authority when there a a failure shows in my opinion poor judgement on managements part.

Either they don't trust their people or don't want to hear about problems or both.

Also, how did you handle the discussion with the CSRs? You seem a bit belligerent and frustrated in your posts, are you approaching the discussions in the same way? That is just a recipe for trouble and unlikely to get you any satisfaction.

I agree. My conversations with res are calm and cordial. Frankly the res agent has been wonderful, except that there isn't really a thing she can do at this point. The seats have been resold and she has no method to request that someone who has the means to deal with why the problem occurred and see about fixing it contact me.

Were you checking the status of your itinerary regularly on UAL.Com?

I was. Once every 3-4 weeks.

If so, when that little red type shows up you need to call immediately, did you?

I did within a few minutes. Unfortunately the change cancellation had occurred on Oct 7th and I didn't check until mid last week. By then the seats were goine.

Did they tell you when the schedule change occurred versus when you first found out? and how did you find out?

I only found out when I went to the web site and checked the itin. They never contacted me. Also the web site showed no alerts. Res confirmed that no message or any kind was sent to me.


Is the contact info you mention in your UA MP profile or actually associated with the itinerary in question?

Both.

Last, the comment about they sold "your" award seats is a lot of bs -- the call center reps have no idea whose seats are which and it's unlikely the cabin is sold out before travel day.

Well, ok. What I was trying to say was that the aircraft has a certain number of FC seats. UA cancelled our reservation and released our seats back into availability. One of those seats was subsequently sold (the res agent checked the date) so there were only 3 seats left if FC, one less than we needed to travel.

So perhaps a more accurate description is that the airline resold one of the seats for which we were holding a reservation. The cabin would be oversold by 1 if they put us back on our original routing. Since they won't oversell FC we are out of luck.

As I said all very good observations. I thank you. As I mentioned as frustrated as I am at the situation (because of all the work for both my wife and her patients to reschedule) I understand that mistakes both human and machine (since they are programmed by humans) happen. It is part of life.

The test of an organization is how it responds to problems and it is here that UA has failed miserably. All they would have had to do is have someone pick up the phone, confirm that in fact the reroute should not have happened, apologized and we would have been on our way to a happy conclusion. Bringing the guy online who is in charge of the system and having him say oops that is ugly and needs to be fixed seems reasonable too.

Good organizations listen to their customers, especially when they have something useful to say. I don't think there is a question that is the case here. Either the system is doing something wrong by cancelling flights without notification (and giving an opportunity to the pax to decide which way to go) or the system is correct in which case I suggest the policy of rerouting without notice is kind of dumb.

Either way one would think that the person runs this part of the business would want to know about it.

I wasn't asking to talk to someone for my ego. I just wanted to let somebody know there was a problem and it really hurt us and perhaps they should be aware of it and fix it.

What one can see from the CN column is that UA doesn't feel much need to fulfil their obligations under the contract they have with the customer (by for example treating tickets from awards differently from paid even though the agreement specificially says they are the same). It is a real eye opener to read the last sentence. Even with a national travel magazine involved knowing the results were going to be published.

In my case its exactly the same. Their own res people agree the cancellation never should have happened and I should have been notified, but the guys actually in charge just don't care.

There just isn't a recognition that what they say and agree to matters.
sbedelman is offline  
Old Nov 2, 06, 10:27 am
  #12  
 
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Hogwash

The agent can see what they resold your seats for? Not possible. There is not a 1:1 correlation of your seat to the person who may be assigned your seat. How does this person not know that they didn't ticket before, and just like the assignments of your seats when they were vacated.

Don't believe everything you hear.
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Old Nov 2, 06, 10:33 am
  #13  
 
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What is most surprising is that the OP was able to get 4 (F-O-U-R) FC seats to Australia on the same flight.
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Old Nov 2, 06, 10:34 am
  #14  
 
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Talking

Originally Posted by iwillflytheworld
What is most surprising is that the OP was able to get 4 (F-O-U-R) FC seats to Australia on the same flight.
I can book you 9 (N-I-N-E) FC award tickets to SYD on some days.
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Old Nov 2, 06, 10:43 am
  #15  
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Originally Posted by milekflyer
I'm not sure I follow the issue here. I see that the only CRJ flight PDXSFO is the one that leaves @ 6PM (must be this flight because it's the only CRJ). The overall travel time via LAX is actually shorter (PDXLAX--a B757--leaves @ 636P and you get into SYD only 15 minutes later). True, the connection time is shorter @ 1h30m vs 2h30m via SFO, but I'm not sure I would call 1.5 hours 'tight'. You also were able to keep FC all the way.

Since the PDXLAX flight leaves only 30 minutes later, I don't follow your argument about your wife having to reschedule patients. You leave 30 minutes later (hardly anything worth having to reschedule over--if anything, it gives your wife more time incase any appts are running late).

UA has to reschedule if the new times are out of whack. But you leave 30 minutes later and get in 15 minutes later. That is not a material difference.

Did I miss something?
Yes, but only because I failed to mention it.

I see problems with the connection you are referring to via LAX.

While the connection in LAX isn't exactly tight, neither is it leisurely. Since it is expected that the onward flight from LAX-SYD will be running sold out or nearly sold out in all classes during this period for days the consequences of missing our connection would be truly ugly.

Even if our tickets were paid we could lose a day or more, get downgraded or have to go via a terrible routing if we missed our flight. Not a happy situation, less happy with two kids.

However despite their own tariffs UA has a habit of not treating tickets issued against awards the same as paid tickets in which case a missed connection could be truly ugly.

So to protect against this sort of unpleasantness I always arrange for any travel in which I have to take an feeder flight into a transcontinental to have at least a generous layover and (even better) an overnight.

Extreme? Perhaps. Given the alternative of standing at a counter having missed your flight, with little or no availability on the airline over the coming days and no chance to be put on another carrier I think it is prudent. Better to avoid problems than to create them.

Our PDX-SFO routing included a roughly 3 hour layover. Plenty of time for most problems and a short enough hop that if its a mechanical worst case we can buy a ticket on AS and still can make the connection. The LAX routing cut that to 90 minutes.

I'm sure it works out most of the time, but if not UA isn't going to guarantee me a seat on the next flight out and I would spend at least a day if not days in LA. Not likely, but not pretty. Better to play it safe.

So having lost the SFO routing and not feeling comfortable taking the 6 pm flight, especially using FC tickets from an award, we are going on the earlier flight.

My decision its true. The 6 pm is a legal connection. But if there is anyone who believes that if we missed our flight in LA that UA would find a way to get us to SYD in FC on nonstop in our reserved class I'll eat my hat. Heck I've seen them cancel a pax reservation because he didn't meet the check in time when the failure was due to lateness on an incoming UA flight.

Forget about the legal side for a moment. Isn't it kind of stupid for the airline to have cancelled my reservation and rerouted me rather than contact us and ask what we wanted to do? We would have gladly downgraded PDX-SFO and eveyone would have been happy.

That their system doesn't do that is pretey silly. That they don't care that it doesn't do it nor about the problems it causes is truly dumb (heck leave the system as is, don't call with schedule changes, mess up another passenger, what do they care its not like the paying ones have a choice and will fly another carrier or anything).

I just don't see Singapore Air acting like this. When something goes wrong they do care and they fix it.

Anyway that's my story. As always your feedback is welcome. If the feeling is no big deal and I can accept that, but at least be aware that your transcontinental booking may be unilateraly changed without your being notified. Won't happen often, when it happens it might not matter, but once in a while it might matter a bunch so keep an eye on that booking as they aren't always sending out alerts asking you to call so you can decide what to do.

Sometime they just do it.
sbedelman is offline  

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