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-   -   United Splitting up Families (Basic Economy ticket) (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/united-airlines-mileageplus/1927588-united-splitting-up-families-basic-economy-ticket.html)

Aknoff Aug 27, 18 4:31 pm

United Splitting up Families (Basic Economy ticket)
 
Had an interesting experience yesterday, and would like to better understand what should have/could have been done should I ever run into a similar situation in the future. Mods, this also pertains to traveling with children, so feel free to move/cross-post, but it happened on United.

My family were traveling MSN-DEN along with my sister-in-law and her two kids (ages 2 and 4) who were traveling MSN-DEN-BUR. All on United. We arrived to MSN a few minutes apart so we were reacquainted at the gate. When we get there, my sister-in-law is in tears and walking away from the gate agent. On the MSN-DEN flight she was given 2 seats together with the 3rd seat in the row behind. On her second flight she was given 3 seats each several rows apart from each other. Some background, I didn't book her tickets, but she booked them through Expedia and it sounds like they were Basic Economy fares, though I'm basing that solely off the gate agent saying "the fare type she booked does not allow seat changes." Sister-in-law claims she couldn't select seats after making her reservation, though admittedly she's not the most savvy at this (clearly) and as a busy working mom was no doubt in a rush, so who knows. Anyway, she was a mess so I offered to discuss with the gate agent on my sister-in-law's behalf. The gate agent was...prickly, to say the least. Neither flight was full, but she claimed due to the fare type it was impossible to give her seats with her two minors. I gently reminded the gate agent that unrelated to United's fare policies there's actually a federal law that prohibits minors being split apart from their parents on planes. She looked at me and simply said "It's not possible." Great customer service. I tried again a few minutes later with a different gate agent, and although he was much nicer, it was clear he was out of his element, so I dropped it.

We boarded the plane and with the help of the flight attendant they managed to move seats around (we couldn't help as we were ~7 rows away) so she could sit with her kids, though one unrelated gentleman unfortunately needed to switch from an aisle to a middle to accommodate and was (rightfully) not not pleased. When we landed in DEN we accompanied them to their next gate and that gate agent easily and happily moved seats around to make sure she had three seats together on the second flight.

As we sat on the tarmac waiting for a thunderstorm to pass I quickly looked at the Families Flying Together Act and found it to be extremely unclear. Was United violating this law? Should the gate agent have switched her seats to comply? Does in-front/behind count as together? Although it all worked out I'm wondering what happened here and how to deal with this in the future should this ever happen to me or someone else I know. Thanks!

WineCountryUA Aug 27, 18 4:56 pm


Originally Posted by Aknoff (Post 30136735)
.... the Families Flying Together Act and found it to be extremely unclear. Was United violating this law? ...

That law directed the DOT/FAA to create regulations on family seating, but to the best of my knowledge, those regulations have not been issued. So there would be nothing for the airlines to violate.

Additionally, UA makes it very clear when purchasing BE that adjacent seating is not likely to happen but if purchased on third-party sites, the information is presented in an incomplete manner. Families should not be purchasing BE and families should be making sure they purchase early enough to get adjacent sitting.

However in IRROPS seating can still get messed up.Happy to hear it all worked out in this case but there will continue to be future issues.

arttravel Aug 27, 18 4:58 pm

Families Flying Together Act really did not get very far -- the FAA Bill of 2016 said Transportation Secretary shall review and if appropriate establish policy -- as far as I know no policy has ever been written.

From the DOT:

If you are interested in sitting next to members of your family, make sure the ticket that you are purchasing allows you to reserve specific seats on your flight.
  • For example, basic economy class tickets are often lower priced tickets that may not provide consumers with the ability to select a seat. These tickets may not meet the needs of families with young children.
https://www.transportation.gov/indiv...family-seating

This has been discussed on flyertalk -- two threads --

https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/sout...-sit-kids.html

https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/trav...s-flights.html

Short answer, no the airline was not violating the law. And if the tickets were Basic Economy the DOT does point out that these tickets may not be appropriate for families with young children.

mduell Aug 27, 18 4:59 pm

Your sister bought a ULCC product, and was surprised when she got a ULCC product?

Yellowjj Aug 27, 18 5:13 pm

Everything may have worked out for your family, but it sure didn't work out for everyone. A stranger was reallocated from his chosen seat to a middle to accommodate your sister in law wanting the "lowest" price. No mom is so busy, she couldn't be bothered finding out why she couldn't select seats together, beforehand with her two minor children. Quite frankly I would be upset if I were the gentleman and this was not a IRROPS situation.

pushmyredbutton Aug 27, 18 5:15 pm


Originally Posted by mduell (Post 30136808)
Your sister bought a ULCC product, and was surprised when she got a ULCC product?

That's the thing - I called it out when airlines began introducing basic economy:

Airlines do a great job highlighting the downsides of BE including an 'opt-in' selection that you understand the terms. Expedia and OTAs make BE fares appear like most others, except with some tiny cautionary wording. I can easily see my family members falling into the same trap.

But yes, they got the product they paid for.

Taoyuan Aug 27, 18 5:19 pm

Did not get what they paid for. They got more than they paid for and stiffed some other guy.

dilanesp Aug 27, 18 5:35 pm

I wish the third party sites would disclose this fully (as UA does). Because a lot of people are infrequent flyers and have no idea how BE works.

azepine00 Aug 27, 18 5:37 pm


Originally Posted by mduell (Post 30136808)
Your sister bought a ULCC product, and was surprised when she got a ULCC product?

cant speak for all ulcc but at least norwegian will seat children together with parent no matter what fare they pay..
to me seating a small child together with at least one parent is common sense - not smth ppl request for comfort or luxury as some seem to imply here

fastair Aug 27, 18 5:40 pm

And Basic economy DOES slow seat assignments to be purchased at a negligible fee (I’ve never seen non E+ seats cost double digit dollars) up till the flight is open for checkin (aprox 24 hours in advance.) One can purchase basic economy, choose seat assignments, and still pay less than a standard economy fare. One just needs to plan ahead when wanting preassigned seats together

arttravel Aug 27, 18 5:50 pm

Expedia makes it clear that there is no seat selection on Basic Economy fares.

i have to say I find it distasteful and fundamentally unfair that someone had to give up their aisle seat to accommodate a family flying on Basic Economy tickets.

i would hope that some gesture was made to the displaced passenger such as offering to buy them something off the buy on board menu.

EmailKid Aug 27, 18 5:55 pm


Originally Posted by azepine00 (Post 30136906)

cant speak for all ulcc but at least norwegian will seat children together with parent no matter what fare they pay..
to me seating a small child together with at least one parent is common sense - not smth ppl request for comfort or luxury as some seem to imply here

Sure, and Tcons can be almost as long as a flight to Europe, but those tend to be Redeyes as well, so kind of hard to split up a family for that. Come to think of it, wonder how UA handles those (don't recall if you can't select a seat or if it's just no baggage / no refund / no change).

writerguyfl Aug 27, 18 6:26 pm


Originally Posted by arttravel (Post 30136936)
Expedia makes it clear that there is no seat selection on Basic Economy fares.

That's not quite right. As fastair notes, Expedia clearly states that a fee applies when choosing seats on a Basic Economy fare. From Expedia:

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/www.fly...d05bf1a225.jpg

But, that's just a technical detail. Your premise holds: Because of lack of planning, lack of knowledge, or reluctance to pay for a seat, another traveler was forced into a less desirable seat. I agree that's not fair.

Collierkr Aug 27, 18 6:42 pm


Originally Posted by WineCountryUA (Post 30136801)
That law directed the DOT/FAA to create regulations on family seating, but to the best of my knowledge, those regulations have not been issued. So there would be nothing for the airlines to violate.

Additionally, UA makes it very clear when purchasing BE that adjacent seating is not likely to happen but if purchased on third-party sites, the information is presented in an incomplete manner. Families should not be purchasing BE and families should be making sure they purchase early enough to get adjacent sitting.

However in IRROPS seating can still get messed up.Happy to hear it all worked out in this case but there will continue to be future issues.

this advice nails it perfctly! Spread the word, put it on Twitter, FB, billboards!

threeoh Aug 27, 18 6:42 pm


Originally Posted by Aknoff (Post 30136735)
When we landed in DEN we accompanied them to their next gate and that gate agent easily and happily moved seats around to make sure she had three seats together on the second flight.

Lest you think the first GA was being a stick in the mud and the second GA was reasonable, it could be they were looking at different flight loads and seating arrangements -- maybe the first flight was completely packed and the GA was unwilling to unseat a non-BE customer (though the FA ultimately was), and the second GA was looking at several empty rows and the switch, while not allowed under BE fare rules, was easy to do without disservicing other passengers.

mahasamatman Aug 27, 18 6:53 pm

Some people have far to high a sense of entitlement. I would be livid if my seat were taken by someone who refuses to plan ahead and thinks the world should revolve around them.


Originally Posted by Aknoff (Post 30136735)
I gently reminded the gate agent that unrelated to United's fare policies there's actually a federal law that prohibits minors being split apart from their parents on planes.

How can you "remind" someone of something that's simply not true? People complain all the time about agents who make up fake rules - it's just as bad when a customer (and not even a passenger) does it.

dtbe Aug 27, 18 8:08 pm

So according to United there is no problem with a 2 years old to sit alone several rows behind her mother? And they expect the flight to take off safely?

It is mother's responsibility to plan ahead, but we can also expect some common sense from the GA. What was s/he thinking that would happen on board?

Plane-is-home Aug 27, 18 8:35 pm


Originally Posted by dtbe (Post 30137329)
So according to United there is no problem with a 2 years old to sit alone several rows behind her mother? And they expect the flight to take off safely?

It is mother's responsibility to plan ahead, but we can also expect some common sense from the GA. What was s/he thinking that would happen on board?

the right thing to do would have been to deny boarding to her and her kids. Of course that would have caused another {issue} on the other hand why can’t UA IT refuse the ticket sale in BE after DOBs of minors are entered ?



IWontRegretThis Aug 27, 18 8:39 pm


Originally Posted by dtbe (Post 30137329)
So according to United there is no problem with a 2 years old to sit alone several rows behind her mother? And they expect the flight to take off safely?

It is mother's responsibility to plan ahead, but we can also expect some common sense from the GA. What was s/he thinking that would happen on board?

One of my favorite quotes-

"A lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part."

Mother should have looked at what she was buying ahead of time and planned accordingly, instead of making up a non existant federal rule to justify having other people moved out of their possibly extra paid-for seats. I see this happen all the time between families with children - if you absolutly must sit together unfortunatly on these cheap fares she should have paid for it. Would have been the same on AA DL or UA so.


Originally Posted by Plane-is-home (Post 30137390)


the right thing to do would have been to deny boarding to her and her kids. Of course that would have caused another shitstorm
on the other hand why can’t UA IT refuse the ticket sale in BE after DOBs of minors are entered ?


I agree with the UA IT part - if the airline is going to come up with the asanine rules behind BE fares, they should at least know by now that it causes these kinds of issues and should have systems in place to deal with it such as your suggestion, instead of leaving it ambiguous especially in the case of 3rd party TAs like expedia.

arttravel Aug 27, 18 10:03 pm


Originally Posted by writerguyfl (Post 30137040)
That's not quite right. As fastair notes, Expedia clearly states that a fee applies when choosing seats on a Basic Economy fare. From Expedia:

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/www.fly...d05bf1a225.jpg

But, that's just a technical detail. Your premise holds: Because of lack of planning, lack of knowledge, or reluctance to pay for a seat, another traveler was forced into a less desirable seat. I agree that's not fair.

Indeed Expedia is not that clear and the wording is poor — once
one goes to the payment section it is shown that seat assignment
is “not available” same with changes etc. Expedia also has a 24 hour cancellation policy for US flights so there was time to figure out the seat assignment issue and cancel if needed



https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/www.fly...a1e8461a3f.png

JVPhoto Aug 27, 18 10:13 pm

I had to look up MSN. Madison seems like it would be big enough but was the first agent UA or contracted staff for MSN?

azepine00 Aug 27, 18 10:23 pm


Originally Posted by mahasamatman (Post 30137124)
Some people have far to high a sense of entitlement. I would be livid if my seat were taken by someone who refuses to plan ahead and thinks the world should revolve around them.

No it has nothing to do with entitlement.
Its the same courtesy that we extent to the elderly by offering them a seat on a bus or perhaps to pregnant women who we let to go ahead of us in some line etc etc..

calling the need for a small child to sit with a parent "entitlement" is just messed up...

It should not be hard for ua to keep young children together with parents as they normally do on countless flights on any fare to avoid reseating issues (which are indeed unfair to others)...

jsloan Aug 27, 18 10:36 pm


Originally Posted by azepine00 (Post 30137646)
Its the same courtesy that we extent to the elderly by offering them a seat on a bus or perhaps to pregnant women who we let to go ahead of us in some line etc etc..

Except that it isn't, really, unless you're on a bus where you can pay to reserve seating and the person elected not to do that.

There are times when plans go awry, seat assignments are lost, IRROPS occurs, etc. It doesn't sound like this was one of them, which is where the charge of "entitlement" comes from. From that perspective, the passenger had an opportunity to purchase a fare that included E- seat assignments, or to purchase E+ seats, chose not to do so, and then wanted to be accommodated anyway, inconveniencing a fellow passenger in the process.

arttravel Aug 27, 18 10:38 pm

When one acts as their own travel agent by booking their own tickets one has to do the research and accept the outcome of their choice.

It would have taken a few extra minutes to review or call and ask, it would save “tears” at the airport.

And I have to agree with mahasamatman that it is not appropriate to misquote legislation — to say there is a law when in fact there is not one.

What can can one do in the future — pay attention to what is being purchased.

It is not fair to pay less and expect someone who has paid more to make accommodations; if that was the case I would be living on 5th Avenue with a view of the park, even though I did not pay for that.

As much as I loathe Basic Economy fares I occasionally meet a traveler that does not — often college students going home and do not need overhead or check in luggage.

I am upset about this scenario because I often buy tickets with not much advance notice, and end up paying E fare code for economy— and would not be pleased to be put in a middle seat to accommodate a Basic Economy family for a 2 hour flight.

UA is clear that family seating is not available on a Basic economy fare and that once seats are assigned they cannot be changed.

What do advise people in the future? Do not buy Basic Economy fares.


Kevin AA Aug 27, 18 10:47 pm

They should send you an e-mail that says "You do not have seat assignments! Pay for one or sit separately on the plane!" Maybe that would get the point across. Making up a nonexistent federal law was a big mistake.

IWontRegretThis Aug 27, 18 10:51 pm


Originally Posted by Kevin AA (Post 30137697)
They should send you an e-mail that says "You do not have seat assignments! Pay for one or sit separately on the plane!" Maybe that would get the point across. Making up a nonexistent federal law was a big mistake.

See this is the sort of sensible thing that if United ever implimented I would be very scared for the state of the universe haha.

DiamondInTheRough Aug 27, 18 11:13 pm

Am I the only one who is wondering why OP didn't help up their sister, by switching with her? It sounds like OP had seats together. At the very least one adult could have switched with a sister's child, so that the child didn't sit alone. Or maybe offered one of their better seats to an inconvenienced passenger who had to take the middle.

arttravel Aug 27, 18 11:14 pm


Originally Posted by azepine00 (Post 30137646)
No it has nothing to do with entitlement.
Its the same courtesy that we extent to the elderly by offering them a seat on a bus or perhaps to pregnant women who we let to go ahead of us in some line etc etc..

calling the need for a small child to sit with a parent "entitlement" is just messed up...

It should not be hard for ua to keep young children together with parents as they normally do on countless flights on any fare to avoid reseating issues (which are indeed unfair to others)...

I take public transportation and will give up my seat for the elderly, disabled, and families. I do that as a courtesy. I did not pay more for my fare than the mother with children. Seniors and disabled get a discount and if I live long enough or have a change of ability I will receive the same discount.

It was a choice to purchase Basic Economy ticket; others pay more to have the ability to chose the seat. Why was it fair to take away the aisle seat of someone for the person who chose the Basic Economy fare?

Entitlement is believing that one’s needs come at the expense or inconvenience of another. Does one get to demand an SUV after paying for a subcompact so the family can be together in the same car?



arttravel Aug 27, 18 11:17 pm


Originally Posted by DiamondInTheRough (Post 30137755)
Am I the only one who is wondering why OP didn't help up their sister, by switching with her? It sounds like OP had seats together. At the very least one adult could have switched with a sister's child, so that the child didn't sit alone.

The undesirable middle seat was likely the reason.

garykung Aug 28, 18 1:20 am

While it is not my intent to pour more gasoline into the fire, indeed OP was wrong, especially with a sense of entitlement.

1. Families Flying Together Act does not exist as a matter of law. Instead, the relevant provision was added as an amendment to the FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016.

2. The relevant provision only asked the DOT to "study" the issue and promulgate regulations if needed. DOT can in fact refuse promulgating regulations, but simply study the situation only.

3. Even assuming the regulations exist and that OP's sister-in-law situation as most favorable as possible, still UA can't, as a matter of law, violate the purported regulations. Because OP's sister-in-law purchased BE, the purchasing constituted a waiver of any rights, if ever existed, for the preferred family seating.

radiowell Aug 28, 18 1:45 am


Originally Posted by fastair (Post 30136912)
And Basic economy DOES slow seat assignments to be purchased at a negligible fee (I’ve never seen non E+ seats cost double digit dollars) up till the flight is open for checkin (aprox 24 hours in advance.) One can purchase basic economy, choose seat assignments, and still pay less than a standard economy fare. One just needs to plan ahead when wanting preassigned seats together

Unfortunately, most people won't bite. As an analogy, if a checked bag is on the table as a "nominal" fee, then everyone will check their bags and we all will have a civilized boarding experience @:-), but alas, it doesn't happen in reality.

ExplorerWannabe Aug 28, 18 1:49 am

What could/should be done or how do you deal with it in the future?
- Buy a fare that allows you to select your seats
- Swap with family members to keep an adult near each kid without forcing another uninvolved passenger to take the middle seat when s/he paid for an aisle or window.
- Don't browbeat the GA or FA

You've already heard that United was NOT violating the law and the GA probably shouldn't have been more accomodating. In front/behind should count for being placed nearby if your objective is to watch the child. If your intent is to keep the child from annoying other travelers, you probably should be sitting right next to him/her.

I would normally be all in for swapping seats to keep the family together but I'm not inclined to do so when I read your story because as much as I would want kids to be placed with their parents, 1) some kids are actually better behaved when separated from their parents, 2) I don't feel inclined to be cramped in the middle because someone else opted for the cheapest fare instead of the fare that lets her sit next to her kids.

secondsoprano Aug 28, 18 1:49 am

I read these kind of stories here from time to time and it always makes me shake my head in utter disbelief. How is this even possible? How can it not be OBVIOUS that families should sit together? I don't care what they paid or what someone else paid or who wants an aisle seat or who is platinum whatever or thinks they're entitled to what. I don't care. It's barbaric. We are talking about young children. Why do you need the law to require you to behave with basic human decency? What sort of uncivilised country allows kids to be separated from their parents like that?

HNLbasedFlyer Aug 28, 18 2:07 am


Originally Posted by secondsoprano (Post 30138162)
I read these kind of stories here from time to time and it always makes me shake my head in utter disbelief. How is this even possible? How can it not be OBVIOUS that families should sit together?

Agreed - I think the easiest way to solve this issue is if any of the travelers are under 18 (or whatever age) should be 1) forced to pay for seats together or 2) if seats aren't available to be seated together at purchase then deny the purchase - seems the easiest way to not inconvenience other passengers.

cbn42 Aug 28, 18 2:24 am

It's clear that Flyertalk is mostly savvy travelers who know the rules and expect everyone else to as well. However, many people have no idea what basic economy is, and the airlines and OTAs don't always do a good job of explaining it.

At the end of the day, the airline is going to have to find a way to let the kids sit with at least one parent, because it's too risky not to. I know there is currently no law requiring it, but there was no law against removing Dr. Dao either, and look how well that worked out for Untied. Publicity can be stronger than any law. What if a child gets molested by another passenger while the parents are in another row? What if "my autistic son had a panic attack because Mr. Diamond-Guest refused to let me sit with him" goes viral on social media?

Right now, congress has asked the government to look into the matter. This is basically telling the airlines "this issue is on our radar, fix it before we make you". If they don't, the government could force airlines to keep families together under threat of fines per incident.

To all of you who are saying "it's her fault and she can deal with the consequences", reality doesn't work that way. Most people don't care about the details about fare class and seat selection, but will not stand for kids being separated from their parents. If airlines don't sort this out, DOT will do it for them.

I feel for the man who had to move to a middle seat, and I would have hated to be in his position, but seat assignments are not guaranteed and can be changed by the airline at any time, per the CoC. It's no different from being made to move to another seat due to a FAM, equipment swap, service animal, or any number of other reasons.

alexbellamy Aug 28, 18 3:15 am


I think it is not an unreasonable expectation for a parent to book a ticket and have an expectation that their child will be seated next to them. On any fare. Sure, they cannot select seats but there may be a default assumption of that.

A little compassion and empathy goes a long way. I would be happy to move to support a parent sitting near their children and would actually find it preferable to looking after their children for them.

As as a frequent flyer of many airlines and countries I struggle with remembering the rules and entitlements. Despite being 1K with nearly 200k PQM this year I would easily fall into this trap too.

Indeed I did with EasyJet earlier this year.. at check-in it turned out I could not sit near my 5 and 8 year old children. I did not intentially book a ticket with such restrictions. So without wasting any further energy, I abandoned my easyJet flight and purchased BA.

Air travel should be user friendly, pleasant and a dignified experience. Somehow the domestic US market has turned into a stressful and generally unpleasant world. Survivable by us battle hardened frequent flyers, but less so by everyone else.

I say all of this as I sit on ANA, a much nicer experience overall. Why can’t it be more like this?

Ditka Aug 28, 18 6:45 am


Originally Posted by cbn42 (Post 30138207)
It's clear that Flyertalk is mostly savvy travelers who know the rules and expect everyone else to as well. However, many people have no idea what basic economy is, and the airlines and OTAs don't always do a good job of explaining it.

At the end of the day, the airline is going to have to find a way to let the kids sit with at least one parent, because it's too risky not to. I know there is currently no law requiring it, but there was no law against removing Dr. Dao either, and look how well that worked out for Untied. Publicity can be stronger than any law. What if a child gets molested by another passenger while the parents are in another row? What if "my autistic son had a panic attack because Mr. Diamond-Guest refused to let me sit with him" goes viral on social media?

Right now, congress has asked the government to look into the matter. This is basically telling the airlines "this issue is on our radar, fix it before we make you". If they don't, the government could force airlines to keep families together under threat of fines per incident.

To all of you who are saying "it's her fault and she can deal with the consequences", reality doesn't work that way. Most people don't care about the details about fare class and seat selection, but will not stand for kids being separated from their parents. If airlines don't sort this out, DOT will do it for them.

I feel for the man who had to move to a middle seat, and I would have hated to be in his position, but seat assignments are not guaranteed and can be changed by the airline at any time, per the CoC. It's no different from being made to move to another seat due to a FAM, equipment swap, service animal, or any number of other reasons.

The options exist for families to sit together and pick their seats. This family chose the cheapest option instead of the best option for their family, then expected everyone else around then to accommodate them.
The issue here is not a lack of compassion or empathy.
go to the Southwest boards and post something about a family not sitting together and you will get the same type of responses

and NO, it is absolutely NOT the same as being moved for a FAM or a service animal.
This person bought a cheap ticket with several warnings associated with it, then got upset when they got what they paid for. And then LIED to get their own way.


omaralt Aug 28, 18 6:46 am

am i the only one here who thinks UA is in the wrong? i mean, yes we all know what a BE entails, but most people dont. when they buy a ticket on a legacy carrier they assume they can select seats; or at the minimum be able to be seated together. United is at fault here. they should automatically not allow you to buy BE seats when traveling with minors, or at least force you to pay for seat selection. otherwise they are saying it's acceptable for a 2 year old to be seated alone?? in what world does that make sense? can you imagine the lawsuit if something happened to that child during the flight? common sense needs to prevail here; UA (and all other airlines) need to ensure that a minor does not sit alone; whether it means forcing you into a higher fare or allowing free seat selection

dgparent Aug 28, 18 6:52 am


Originally Posted by secondsoprano (Post 30138162)
I read these kind of stories here from time to time and it always makes me shake my head in utter disbelief. How is this even possible? How can it not be OBVIOUS that families should sit together? I don't care what they paid or what someone else paid or who wants an aisle seat or who is platinum whatever or thinks they're entitled to what. I don't care. It's barbaric. We are talking about young children. Why do you need the law to require you to behave with basic human decency? What sort of uncivilised country allows kids to be separated from their parents like that?

They can sit together no problem, just buy the correct fare, and pick your seats. Pretty simple. BE is for :

1. People travelling alone and do not care where they sit
2. People travelling together and do not care if they are split up and don't care about seat assignments.

If I am "too busy" to make the proper reservations, I mean who doesn't have 10 minutes to make a reservation after the kids are in bed, then why should I have the right to ask the airline to make others move because I am "too busy" ? Really ? IRROPS and you bought the correct fare no problem get the family together, too busy to bother or to cheap not my problem and not the airlines either.

People that travel get jaded, they see these "stories" every week. Preboarding last month in LAX on AA, 1 lady is on crutches she had 9 people preboard with her, do you think after seeing that and many other examples of passengers taking advantage of the system that when we are asked to switch to a middle seat to accommodate someone we say just say no ?

omaralt Aug 28, 18 6:54 am


Originally Posted by dgparent (Post 30138719)
They can sit together no problem, just buy the correct fare, and pick your seats. Pretty simple. BE is for :

1. People travelling alone and do not care where they sit
2. People travelling together and do not care if they are split up and don't care about seat assignments.

If I am "too busy" to make the proper reservations, I mean who doesn't have 10 minutes to make a reservation after the kids are in bed, then why should I have the right to ask the airline to make others move because I am "too busy" ? Really ? IRROPS and you bought the correct fare no problem get the family together, too busy to bother or to cheap not my problem and not the airlines either.

no, i disagree. in something as important as seating families with young children (i'm not talking about 10+ year olds here) then the decision should not be left to the individual. the airline needs to force the issue. either force you to pay for for full economy or allow free seat selection. BA famously charges for seat selection, even in business class. however i'm flying in business with BA next month and lo and behold they allow free seat selection when traveling with an infant.


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