Babyseat blocked recline

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Old Mar 21, 18, 9:05 am
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Originally Posted by BeatCal View Post

AA, Delta and UA do not
which do
British Air, AF but not American
Originally Posted by BeatCal View Post

AA, Delta, UA don’t allow bassinets
which America based does.?
Are you confusing bassinets with the lap belts that US carriers don't allow but European airlines do?
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Old Mar 21, 18, 9:13 am
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Originally Posted by BeatCal View Post

AA, Delta, UA don’t allow bassinets
which America based does.?
UA.com

Bassinets

Bassinets are large enough to hold an infant weighing 22 pounds (10 kg) or less. They may not be used during taxi, takeoff or landing, or when the seatbelt sign is illuminated. A limited number of bassinets are available for use, free of charge, on international aircraft only. Bassinets are available for customers traveling international segments in United Polaris business class on select 757, 767, 777 and 787 aircraft and in United Economy® on 747, 757, 767, 777 and 787 aircraft. Bassinets are not available for customers traveling in United Polaris first class, United First® or United Business® at this time.

Customers can request a bassinet by calling the United Customer Contact Center at 1-800-UNITED-1 (1-800-864-8331) within the United States or the appropriate Worldwide Contact Center. We will provide accompanying seat assignments for an adult traveling with an infant and up to one travel companion. There is no fee for these seat assignments when arranged by the United Customer Contact Center or with a United representative at the airport. Bassinet availability is limited, and these arrangements are not guaranteed.
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Old Mar 21, 18, 9:52 am
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Originally Posted by ctownflyer View Post
I have no idea about on an airplane, but given that infant carseats are only rear-facing (kids should be rear facing in a car for as long as possible for safety reasons), it's not a surprise that people will bring that seat on the plane.
https://www.faa.gov/travelers/fly_children/

Did you know that the safest place for your child A CRS must be installed in a forward-facing aircraft seat, in accordance with manufacturer's instructions. This includes placing the CRS in the appropriate forward- or aft-facing direction as indicated on the label for the size of the child.on an airplane is in a government-approved child safety restraint system (CRS) or device, not on your lap? Your arms aren't capable of holding your child securely, especially during unexpected turbulence.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) strongly urges you to secure your child in a CRS or device for the duration of your flight. It's the smart and right thing to do so that everyone in your family arrives safely at your destination. The FAA is giving you the information you need to make informed decisions about your family's travel plans.

A CRS must be installed in a forward-facing aircraft seat, in accordance with manufacturer's instructions. This includes placing the CRS in the appropriate forward- or aft-facing direction as indicated on the label for the size of the child.

The FAA does not control the approval of hard-backed child restraint systems (CRS), nor does it recommend one over another. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards set the standards that manufacturers must meet in order to sell approved CRSs. Only then are two labels approved to be attached to the seat and must read as follows:
  • This child restraint system conforms to all applicable Federal motor vehicle safety standards.
  • THIS RESTRAINT SYSTEM IS CERTIFIED FOR USE IN MOTOR VEHICLES AND AIRCRAFT.
In September 2006, the FAA approved a new type of child safety device for use on commercial airline flights. Passengers may use an FAA-approved harness-type device, approved only for use on aircraft, which attaches to the aircraft seat. It is not approved for use in motor vehicles. The device uses an additional belt and shoulder harness that goes around the seat back and attaches to the passenger lap belt, providing improved upper torso restraint. It is appropriate for children weighing between 22 and 44 pounds. The device provides an alternative to using a forward-facing child safety seat.For more information about flying with children, visit our website.​​​​
Originally Posted by JVPhoto View Post
UA.com

Bassinets

Bassinets are large enough to hold an infant weighing 22 pounds (10 kg) or less. They may not be used during taxi, takeoff or landing, or when the seatbelt sign is illuminated. A limited number of bassinets are available for use, free of charge, on international aircraft only. Bassinets are available for customers traveling international segments in United Polaris business class on select 757, 767, 777 and 787 aircraft and in United Economy® on 747, 757, 767, 777 and 787 aircraft. Bassinets are not available for customers traveling in United Polaris first class, United First® or United Business® at this time.

Customers can request a bassinet by calling the United Customer Contact Center at 1-800-UNITED-1 (1-800-864-8331) within the United States or the appropriate Worldwide Contact Center. We will provide accompanying seat assignments for an adult traveling with an infant and up to one travel companion. There is no fee for these seat assignments when arranged by the United Customer Contact Center or with a United representative at the airport. Bassinet availability is limited, and these arrangements are not guaranteed.
I stand corrected. When I flew UA did not allow. Delta now allows them international too

must be related to flying into @ country that allows them. EG: European airlines do not allow ES dogs except when flyin to / from the US
Originally Posted by ctownflyer View Post
FWIW I've been reseated multiple times by FAs who have claimed that you can't have a rear facing carseat in a bulkhead seat. I've never seen that written anywhere, but it's just not worth arguing things like that with power-tripping FAs. Now I just stay away from bulkheads when traveling with rear facing carseats.
print out
https://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/airline_operators/airline_safety/info/all_infos/media/2015/info15013deltasays bulkhead seats cannot be used when the safety seat is a combination car seat and stroller
faa says any seat incluuding bulhead but airlines can restrict certain seats
Can raise arm rests to accommodate seat. May ban from evacuation seats

here is guide for all airlines into US
https://www.tripsavvy.com/us-airline...policies-54207

the next time a FA tells you differenty, have her call the gate agent or pilot

Last edited by WineCountryUA; Mar 21, 18 at 11:22 am Reason: merging consecutive posts by same member; please use multi-quote
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Old Mar 21, 18, 10:15 am
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Originally Posted by BeatCal View Post

print out
https://www.faa.gov/other_visit/avia.../info15013.pdf

faa says any seat incluuding bulhead. Can raise arm rests to accommodate seat. May ban from evacuation seats

the next time a FA tells you differenty, have her call the gate agent or pilot
There is nothing in the document you linked that prohibits a flight attendant from requesting that you change seats. In fact, it says the exact opposite:
An operator may have policies based on safe operating practices that establish certain seat locations for a passenger who uses a CRS on a specific aircraft. Even if a certain seat in another location in the same class of service can accommodate an approved CRS, an operator does not have to permit the CRS in that location if the operator’s policies disallow the CRS in that seat.
Basically, the operator MUST accommodate the CRS, but they can ask you to move as long as they can reaccommodate you in the same class of service. This is also consistent with the concept that seat assignments are not guaranteed under any circumstance.
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Old Mar 21, 18, 10:27 am
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Originally Posted by BeatCal View Post
D


print out
https://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/airline_operators/airline_safety/info/all_infos/media/2015/info15013deltasays bulkhead seats cannot be used when the safety seat is a combination car seat and stroller
faa says any seat incluuding bulhead but airlines can restrict certain seats
Can raise arm rests to accommodate seat. May ban from evacuation seats

here is guide for all airlines into US
https://www.tripsavvy.com/us-airline...policies-54207



the next time a FA tells you differenty, have her call the gate agent or pilot
Simply not worth the fight. I just don't pick bulkheads when flying with carseats anymore.

Originally Posted by BeatCal View Post

I stand corrected. When I flew UA did not allow. Delta now allows them international too

must be related to flying into @ country that allows them. EG: European airlines do not allow ES dogs except when flyin to / from the US
All airlines have always allowed bassinets. You need to request them in advance. The only thing US carriers ban are lap belts for infants.

I used a bassinet once in 2011 from IAH-HNL and won't make that mistake again. Had to hold onto the infant for takeoff and landing and had to wake and remove the baby every time the seatbelt light came on, so it was worse than useless.
After that we bought a seat and use a carseat for safety and so that the baby can sleep undisturbed.

Last edited by WineCountryUA; Mar 21, 18 at 11:23 am Reason: merging consecutive posts by same member
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Old Mar 21, 18, 11:08 am
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Maybe that is why I said no
was on a NA and infant in it the entire time. It apparently “locked”surrounding the child
Originally Posted by ctownflyer View Post
Simply not worth the fight. I just don't pick bulkheads when flying with carseats anymore.
can’t let them boss u when they r wrong

Last edited by WineCountryUA; Mar 21, 18 at 11:23 am Reason: merging consecutive posts by same member; please use multi-quote
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Old Mar 21, 18, 1:41 pm
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Originally Posted by Sykes View Post
There is nothing in the document you linked that prohibits a flight attendant from requesting that you change seats. In fact, it says the exact opposite:
An operator may have policies based on safe operating practices that establish certain seat locations for a passenger who uses a CRS on a specific aircraft. Even if a certain seat in another location in the same class of service can accommodate an approved CRS, an operator does not have to permit the CRS in that location if the operator’s policies disallow the CRS in that seat.
Basically, the operator MUST accommodate the CRS, but they can ask you to move as long as they can reaccommodate you in the same class of service. This is also consistent with the concept that seat assignments are not guaranteed under any circumstance.
Skytes Interestingly put. But it states the operator, "not the FA". AA reportedly does not allow in bulkhead as those seat belts have air bags in them. The article I posted has rules from all airlines and those rules supersede the FA
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Old Mar 21, 18, 2:23 pm
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Originally Posted by BeatCal View Post
Skytes Interestingly put. But it states the operator, "not the FA". AA reportedly does not allow in bulkhead as those seat belts have air bags in them. The article I posted has rules from all airlines and those rules supersede the FA
You actually don't know the rules for all airlines. The policies that the FA must follow may differ from aircraft to aircraft, and can actually differ depending on the type of operation. Those policies are not published to the public, and none of the links you posted speak to them in detail. It is certainly true that we sometimes encounter a power-tripping flight attendant, but we're at a disadvantage in that in some areas, like this one, we have no way of knowing for sure what additional legitimate restrictions might exist, so it's almost impossible to discern between an actual policy and a made-up-on-the-spot "rule". Aside from that, fighting with a power-tripping FA is not a recipe for a pleasant flight.
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Old Mar 21, 18, 2:51 pm
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Originally Posted by Sykes View Post
You actually don't know the rules for all airlines. The policies that the FA must follow may differ from aircraft to aircraft, and can actually differ depending on the type of operation. Those policies are not published to the public, and none of the links you posted speak to them in detail. It is certainly true that we sometimes encounter a power-tripping flight attendant, but we're at a disadvantage in that in some areas, like this one, we have no way of knowing for sure what additional legitimate restrictions might exist, so it's almost impossible to discern between an actual policy and a made-up-on-the-spot "rule". Aside from that, fighting with a power-tripping FA is not a recipe for a pleasant flight.
Bingo. Need to pick your battles. Easier to just select other seats in the first place and not have to battle at all.

I've traveled on 150 flights with carseats and I've heard it all. When they say that I can't have a carseat at all, that's when I call out the BS.

Several years ago I didn't know that you can't have a carseat in the row in front of or behind the exit row. I sat with an infant from CLE-MCI on a UA Q400 in F class, seats 2CD without a problem. On the return trip the FA told me that I can't sit in 2CD as it's the row behind 1CD, which is an exit row on the Q400. Those are the only 2 rows of 2 seats on the Q400, so we were booted back to coach.

I protested, but sure enough the FA pulled out the manual confirming that she was right, despite the countless times it hadn't been enforced. Live and learn.
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Old Mar 21, 18, 5:33 pm
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Originally Posted by BeatCal View Post
1. The seats have to be FAA approved which do fit all plane seats
2. The expectation to have your child in a child seat overweighs yours of a recline
3. Read the physics of turbulence. It is not comparable to a baby-buggy. It is why you cannot have sometihng on your lap on take off and landing. Also the incidence of scalp burns on lap childs is high (requiring ER)
You are missing the points here:
1) I am referring to proper installation, not the car seat fitting into the seat (and I can assure you that I have been on many planes where even a small adult barely fits into a seat,, never mind trying to put a car seat in). To install a child seat in a car it must be literally weighed down by someone way bigger than me in order to get the straps properly tightened. As such the large majority of car seats are incorrectly installed according to many new articles, An airline seatbelt is not self-tightening and I have never seen a parent put any weight on the seat when buckling it in. As such it can, and does easily move around and will rotate without a tether strap which I have also never seen anyone use,
2) Guess I will be bringing a doctor's note from now on as having a reclinable seat is a health requirement for me.
3) I am talking about the probabilities here... not about turbulence in a baby buggy. i.e. the chance of a child being injured in a plane (and for that matter any other person) is way less than being in a car, walking down a street or whatever.

Last edited by WineCountryUA; Mar 21, 18 at 9:47 pm Reason: repaired quote
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Old Mar 21, 18, 6:16 pm
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Originally Posted by ctownflyer View Post
There is a CARES harness.
Personally though we need a carseat where we are coming from and where we are going, so may as well bring it on the plane as well.
I see your point. But, if the normal car seat inconveniences others, and an alternative airline seat is just as good and does not inconvenience others, why not use the alternative? The car seat can be shipped with the luggage. Right? Or have they stopped doing that. It's been a while since I have had to tote a car seat across the country, other than in a car.
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Old Mar 21, 18, 6:22 pm
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Originally Posted by cruiser9999 View Post
Originally Posted by BeatCal View Post
1. The seats have to be FAA approved which do fit all plane seats
You are missing the points here:
As such the large majority of car seats are incorrectly installed according to many new articles, An airline seatbelt is not self-tightening and I have never seen a parent put any weight on the seat when buckling it in. As such it can, and does easily move around and will rotate without a tether strap which I have also never seen anyone use,
2) Guess I will be bringing a doctor's note from now on as having a reclinable seat is a health requirement for me.
3) I am talking about the probabilities here... not about turbulence in a baby buggy. i.e. the chance of a child being injured in a plane (and for that matter any other person) is way less than being in a car, walking down a street or whatever.
You make a good case for a specially designed child seat that the airlines use for small children and babies. Presumably, (naive fool that I am) they would be designed to easily be installed in the safest possible manner.

Last edited by WineCountryUA; Mar 21, 18 at 9:50 pm Reason: reapired quote
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Old Mar 21, 18, 7:20 pm
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Originally Posted by MrTemporal View Post
I see your point. But, if the normal car seat inconveniences others, and an alternative airline seat is just as good and does not inconvenience others, why not use the alternative? The car seat can be shipped with the luggage. Right? Or have they stopped doing that. It's been a while since I have had to tote a car seat across the country, other than in a car.
Carseat manufacturers advise not to check in carseats as they can suffer hairline cracks when handled poorly.

Only an infant rear-facing carseat is going to hinder recline anyway. Extremely unlikely that US airlines will come up with any carseat, let alone one for an infant, so this all moot anyway. Aside from a few kvetchy FTers, this is hardly a pressing concern for 99.99% of flyers.
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Old Mar 22, 18, 5:01 am
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Originally Posted by ctownflyer View Post
Bingo. Need to pick your battles. Easier to just select other seats in the first place and not have to battle at all.

I've traveled on 150 flights with carseats and I've heard it all. When they say that I can't have a carseat at all, that's when I call out the BS.

Several years ago I didn't know that you can't have a carseat in the row in front of or behind the exit row. I sat with an infant from CLE-MCI on a UA Q400 in F class, seats 2CD without a problem. On the return trip the FA told me that I can't sit in 2CD as it's the row behind 1CD, which is an exit row on the Q400. Those are the only 2 rows of 2 seats on the Q400, so we were booted back to coach.

I protested, but sure enough the FA pulled out the manual confirming that she was right, despite the countless times it hadn't been enforced. Live and learn.
I

I always looked at their policies written (which do state not in front or behind exit seat). The last time I had a problem, I wrote Delta and they gave me back a letter that said car seats are allowed in bulkhead on all their flights (in fact peferred location). I then carried it with me for the few FA who made their own rules.
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Old Mar 22, 18, 9:55 am
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Originally Posted by CDTraveler View Post
There is no right to a reclining seat. If there were, every seat on the plane would have to be a reclining seat, and quite a few don't, such as ones in front of the exit row, or at the back of the cabin. I don't see that you were denied "full use of your seat" - did you have to share the seat with someone? Give it up halfway through the flight? An optional feature of the seat, which is nowhere guarantee by the airline, was unavailable. The airline was generous in returning a portion of your miles.
your rights don’t “over” someone elses
FA could have moved you
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