United Pilot Q & A thread

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Old Nov 22, 18, 1:36 pm
  #61  
 
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How often do towbars break during pushback?
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Old Nov 22, 18, 2:15 pm
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It happens occasionally. They are quickly replacing tow bars with tugs that capture the nose wheel and lift it off the ground for pushback.
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Old Nov 23, 18, 6:26 am
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Originally Posted by LarryJ View Post
It happens occasionally. They are quickly replacing tow bars with tugs that capture the nose wheel and lift it off the ground for pushback.
I once arrived home 29 hours late from Heathrow because of a broken tow bar so I'm glad to hear this
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Old Nov 23, 18, 7:44 am
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Originally Posted by LarryJ View Post
It happens occasionally. They are quickly replacing tow bars with tugs that capture the nose wheel and lift it off the ground for pushback.
Huh, so this is why on recent flights I've felt the plane drop a bit (ever so slight) after pushback. Now I know why!
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Old Nov 23, 18, 7:53 am
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Originally Posted by UAL250 View Post
Huh, so this is why on recent flights I've felt the plane drop a bit (ever so slight) after pushback. Now I know why!
Some tug drivers are a lot smoother than others at lowering the nose gear back down. I think it takes some practice to do really smoothly.
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Old Nov 23, 18, 8:02 am
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Originally Posted by LarryJ View Post
Some tug drivers are a lot smoother than others at lowering the nose gear back down. I think it takes some practice to do really smoothly.
A tug driver at ORD last September was not so smooth releasing an E175--the drop knocked the FA off her feet and into my lap. All involved could only laugh at the situation.
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Old Mar 5, 19, 7:12 pm
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Can a pilot work a flight on any aircraft they are type rated for and current on? Or are they restricted to the aircraft type they are currently assigned to?
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Old Mar 5, 19, 9:03 pm
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Originally Posted by TomMM View Post
Can a pilot work a flight on any aircraft they are type rated for and current on? Or are they restricted to the aircraft type they are currently assigned to?
At United, as with most commercial airlines, pilots are only current on one type. They may hold other type ratings, but aren't actively flying other fleets and thus do not remain current. For instance, the 757/767 is one type rating, so with required differences training completed, a pilot on the B756 fleet can flow across the 757-200/300 and 767-300/400, but can't also fly the 777 or 737, even if previously type-rated in those fleets.
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Old Mar 6, 19, 9:42 am
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Originally Posted by EWR764 View Post
At United, as with most commercial airlines, pilots are only current on one type. They may hold other type ratings, but aren't actively flying other fleets and thus do not remain current. For instance, the 757/767 is one type rating, so with required differences training completed, a pilot on the B756 fleet can flow across the 757-200/300 and 767-300/400, but can't also fly the 777 or 737, even if previously type-rated in those fleets.
757/767 would be a really cool combo for a UA pilot. Lots of places to go, both domestic and in Europe and South America.

Do they fly both the 757 and 767 in the same month or even the same trip? Or is it like one month for 757 and the next 767, and so on?
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Old Mar 6, 19, 10:00 am
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Originally Posted by UAL250 View Post
757/767 would be a really cool combo for a UA pilot. Lots of places to go, both domestic and in Europe and South America.

Do they fly both the 757 and 767 in the same month or even the same trip? Or is it like one month for 757 and the next 767, and so on?
What’s “cool” to us is a line with all 767-400 because it pays the most....but I digress.

To answer your question we interchange aircraft frequently. I’ve had a few trips lately to Europe outbound on 763, inbound on 764.

The cockpit layouts in the B757/B763 are similar. 764 is very different though. That plane goes most senior in the fleet.
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Old Mar 6, 19, 10:16 am
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Originally Posted by UAL250 View Post
757/767 would be a really cool combo for a UA pilot. Lots of places to go, both domestic and in Europe and South America.
EWR 756 has about the most diverse flying in the system, with domestic/Caribbean day turns, two-day transcons, Europe, all-nighters to South America, Hawaii, charters, etc. The only thing it misses are the super high-time Asia trips, but those aren't for everyone. And, as @clubord points out, the fleet gets top-of-the-scale pay on the 764.
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Old Mar 7, 19, 8:59 pm
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Originally Posted by EWR764 View Post
EWR 756 has about the most diverse flying in the system, with domestic/Caribbean day turns, two-day transcons, Europe, all-nighters to South America, Hawaii, charters, etc. The only thing it misses are the super high-time Asia trips, but those aren't for everyone. And, as @clubord points out, the fleet gets top-of-the-scale pay on the 764.
I flew LHR-EWR about a month ago on the 764 and the pilots were based out of IAD (and the crew LHR) — thought it a little odd to have an IAD flight crew fly into EWR (and then presumably have to deadhead back to IAD), especially since I guess there should be way more 757/67 pilots based in EWR than IAD. Also presumably the pilots were sUA, so was interesting to have an all-UA crew on a CO plane.

Also about halfway through the flight a pilot came on the PA and announced "flight attendants please check in", and repeated that again about 5 minutes later. Same announcement happened ~30 minutes after that as well — so what does "checking in" mean, and why would such an announcement be made? Have never heard that one before in any of my flights.
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Old Mar 7, 19, 9:26 pm
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Originally Posted by truncated View Post
I flew LHR-EWR about a month ago on the 764 and the pilots were based out of IAD (and the crew LHR) — thought it a little odd to have an IAD flight crew fly into EWR (and then presumably have to deadhead back to IAD), especially since I guess there should be way more 757/67 pilots based in EWR than IAD. Also presumably the pilots were sUA, so was interesting to have an all-UA crew on a CO plane.

Also about halfway through the flight a pilot came on the PA and announced "flight attendants please check in", and repeated that again about 5 minutes later. Same announcement happened ~30 minutes after that as well — so what does "checking in" mean, and why would such an announcement be made? Have never heard that one before in any of my flights.
Was this just after turbulance? I've noticed this lately after the Pilot has the FAs take their jump seats. I think it so that they can be sure all are ok.
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Old Mar 7, 19, 9:30 pm
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Originally Posted by toddt View Post
Was this just after turbulance? I've noticed this lately after the Pilot has the FAs take their jump seats. I think it so that they can be sure all are ok.
Don't think so — flight was largely smooth until we got to EWR
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Old Mar 7, 19, 9:38 pm
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Originally Posted by truncated View Post
I flew LHR-EWR about a month ago on the 764 and the pilots were based out of IAD (and the crew LHR) — thought it a little odd to have an IAD flight crew fly into EWR (and then presumably have to deadhead back to IAD), especially since I guess there should be way more 757/67 pilots based in EWR than IAD.
I think there are a lot of "M"-shaped trips. Like IAD-LHR-EWR-LHR-IAD (with overnight layovers, of course).

I had a friend who was a UA FA and I think she flew EWR-NRT-DEN-NRT-EWR a lot (iirc). Not 100% sure pilots do this too because I think in this case it was because DEN didn't have enough Japanese language speaker FAs.

It's also possible they'd dead-head back to IAD after, of course. Could have asked!
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