FlyerTalk Forums

FlyerTalk Forums (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/index.php)
-   United Airlines | MileagePlus (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/united-airlines-mileageplus-681/)
-   -   No nuts for me....due to NRSA allergy (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/united-airlines-mileageplus/1795582-no-nuts-me-due-nrsa-allergy.html)

zombietooth Oct 12, 16 11:14 am


Originally Posted by palmetto86 (Post 27336672)
This is a funny thread. I'd hate to see how you all would react on Southwest. All it takes is one allergy onboard a WN flight for the FAs to not serve peanuts to anyone ON THE ENTIRE PLANE.

That's why we "entitled" UA elites don't fly lowly WN.:D
UA upholds our standards for us. See here:

http://www.independent.ie/irish-news...-30521385.html

Artpen100 Oct 12, 16 11:37 am

But in that incident on UA, after the first flight had to return for a medical emergency, UA declined to fly the child until (I suspect after a medical consultation) they believed the child could fly without putting the child's life in danger. Seems reasonable and consistent with their policy. It is better to be a day late than risk death.

WineCountryUA Oct 12, 16 1:41 pm

Topic Check

This thread is about a passenger not getting served nuts due to allergy of a relocating UX? FA in an adjacent seat. While the topic of allergies while flying is clearly related, let's stay focused on UA and not turn this into a much broader discussion.
AND let's remember the FT mantra "Discuss the issue, not the poster." Once we get commenting on each other, the threads go badly. Disagree all you want, but commenting on the morality or humanity of other posters is not allowed

12.2 Avoid Getting Personal
If you have a difference of opinion with another member, challenge the idea — NOT the person. Getting personal with another member is not allowed. Personal attacks, insults, baiting and flaming will not be tolerated.
....
If another member gets personal with you, do not retaliate. Retaliation may well subject you to the same discipline. Instead, please use the 'Alert a moderator to this thread' button in the lower-left-hand-corner of each post, send a note explaining your concern to the moderator team, and leave it to them to handle.
WineCountryUA
UA coModerator

rufflesinc Oct 12, 16 2:15 pm


Originally Posted by palmetto86 (Post 27336672)
This is a funny thread. I'd hate to see how you all would react on Southwest. All it takes is one allergy onboard a WN flight for the FAs to not serve peanuts to anyone ON THE ENTIRE PLANE.

As a responsible adult, I bring my own nut-based snacks and you can pry them out of my cold dead hands.

zombietooth Oct 12, 16 3:48 pm


Originally Posted by Artpen100 (Post 27336806)
But in that incident on UA, after the first flight had to return for a medical emergency, UA declined to fly the child until (I suspect after a medical consultation) they believed the child could fly without putting the child's life in danger. Seems reasonable and consistent with their policy. It is better to be a day late than risk death.

I can assure you that there is no possible way to prevent someone on a United flight from being exposed to nuts, no matter what they say:

In GF out of NRT, a few weeks ago, my wife lost her watch down the side of her seat. In an effort to recover it, I had to lay down flat on the floor and use a powerful flashlight to find it. What I saw under the seat and in the mechanical workings was interesting: Several nuts, lots of dust-bunnies, a couple flossers, money (I recovered a 500 Yen coin), tissues, croutons, a desiccated piece of sushi, a sock, and myriad other unidentifiable small particles.

:-:UA didn't wait until the plane was safe for the child, UA was trying to minimize liability and put on a good dog and pony show for the family.

joshwex90 Oct 13, 16 1:20 am


Originally Posted by fastair (Post 27331701)
I don't believe it's lack of empathy, it's psuedo-elitism. Remember, this wasn't a person, it was a NRSA. The negative posts don't knock the food allergy per se, they knock WHO had the food allergy.

I'm surprised you would write the bolded (emphasis mine), especially considering you work for UA and I assume are sometimes NRSA. You could say they're not a paying passenger, but they're certainly a person. And therein lies the crux. Perhaps I'm oversensitive because I am deathly allergic to peanuts (though I've never had an issue on planes - when people eat peanuts around me, I've always asked POLITELY if they can refrain, and have offered to get them other snacks, and people in general seem to be good, as I've never been refused) and perhaps I'm oversensitive for other reasons, don't know.

I agree that NRSA shouldn't be dictating or asking for seat changes or getting preferential meal, etc. Fine, you're not paying for your seat and that's a part of your contract - free seat for "lesser" rights. But not lesser rights as a PERSON, just as a passenger. A nut allergy is an issue a person faces. Like someone above posted, does an NRSA have to wait on board in event of emergency evacuation until paying pax have de-planed? Although on a lesser scale (and tact could have been different), this falls under that rubric (at least IMO).


Originally Posted by Miggles (Post 27332673)
Such customers would probably rather cling to their fear than be corrected and assured by their physicians that their concerns are way overblown. Just take a look at how the anti-vaccine craziness grew to crisis proportions.

And to put this in perspective, the airport that this NRSA used probably has plenty of nut particles in the air already. Furthermore, the seat that she sat in probably has nut crumbs as well. Unless her fellow passenger has the table manners of Cookie Monster, I doubt that she was every in any danger.

This belies a lack of knowledge of how nut allergies work.

PVDtoDEL Oct 13, 16 1:39 am


Originally Posted by joshwex90 (Post 27339776)
A nut allergy is an issue a person faces. Like someone above posted, does an NRSA have to wait on board in event of emergency evacuation until paying pax have de-planed? Although on a lesser scale (and tact could have been different), this falls under that rubric (at least IMO).

I agree with this assessment, but I would say that an NRSA should be held to a higher standard when it comes to politely and apologetically explaining to the inconvenienced passenger what the issue is.

This whole incident would've been a non-event if the FA had been a bit more circumspect about how her needs were impacting others around her.

joshwex90 Oct 13, 16 1:57 am


Originally Posted by PVDtoDEL (Post 27339818)
I agree with this assessment, but I would say that an NRSA should be held to a higher standard when it comes to politely and apologetically explaining to the inconvenienced passenger what the issue is.

This whole incident would've been a non-event if the FA had been a bit more circumspect about how her needs were impacting others around her.

I agree that you can divide the question
  1. Is a nut allergy a legitimate "complaint?"
  2. Should it be said with tact and politely?
I think the answer to the first is yes to everyone, equally
I think the answer to the second is yes, but significantly more so when it comes to NRSA

Because the first is about the person (NRSA shouldn't matter - we're all human beings). The second is about a passenger (no longer about life and death; it's about approaching other passengers).

gold23 Oct 13, 16 8:04 am

I bring nuts onto almost all of my UAX flights, generally one of those nuts/M&M combos that make me feel as if I'm at least trying to be healthy while gorging on sweets. Anyway, there have been two instances in the last three months where I've had someone near me ask me not to open/eat the nuts.

One was a father travelling with his daughter who was allergic. They were two rows in front of me on a RJ-145. He asked nicely, almost pleading. I cut him off and said of course I won't open them. That would have been exceedingly selfish of me to eat. I know in advance people are allergic and if I absolutely needed to ensure I had something to eat I'd have chosen another snack. The other one was a very rude older woman. I find it extremely rare that older people have this allergy, but that's irrelevant. She saw my bag, sitting across from me in the exit row, and demanded I not open. I was a bit put off by her demand, and told her so, but I still didn't open them. See....this is a severe allergy, and the tone of the person asking is not relevant at all.

In the OP's instance, I have absolutely no sympathy for him. It's a cup of nuts, likely prior to a main meal. I like them too, but the talk of people getting upset over the FA reaction- and several saying they would ask for them out of spite and without regard to the health issue!!!- is abhorrent to me. Just because you paid for a business class ticket does not give you the right to disregard fellow passenger safety- no matter how or why they are near you.

This gets under my skin...the lack of regard for others....

swixo Oct 13, 16 8:10 am


Originally Posted by gold23 (Post 27340553)
This gets under my skin...the lack of regard for others....

Cuts both ways. Here's a band-aid.

s

rufflesinc Oct 13, 16 11:11 am


Originally Posted by gold23 (Post 27340553)
I bring nuts onto almost all of my UAX flights, generally one of those nuts/M&M combos that make me feel as if I'm at least trying to be healthy while gorging on sweets. Anyway, there have been two instances in the last three months where I've had someone near me ask me not to open/eat the nuts.

One was a father travelling with his daughter who was allergic. They were two rows in front of me on a RJ-145. He asked nicely, almost pleading. I cut him off and said of course I won't open them. That would have been exceedingly selfish of me to eat. I know in advance people are allergic and if I absolutely needed to ensure I had something to eat I'd have chosen another snack. The other one was a very rude older woman. I find it extremely rare that older people have this allergy, but that's irrelevant. She saw my bag, sitting across from me in the exit row, and demanded I not open. I was a bit put off by her demand, and told her so, but I still didn't open them. See....this is a severe allergy, and the tone of the person asking is not relevant at all.

I have health issues that make me adverse to the for sale food. Should I have to not eat my nut KIND bars on a 6 hr tcon?

pinniped Oct 13, 16 11:19 am

I think it's clear-cut: the FA handled this terribly. I'd be unhappy if I was the paying customer.

I get the seriousness of the nut allergy. I could take or leave nuts myself, but if I'm sitting in a cabin with other paying customers with a severe allergy, I'll happily skip the nuts. No biggie to me, and I understand it *is* a big deal to someone with the allergy.

But the nonrev should have gone to the back of the plane - period. Not snapped at the paying customer while the nuts were being served. That's just poor on all accounts. :td:

747FC Oct 13, 16 12:16 pm


Originally Posted by gold23 (Post 27340553)
This gets under my skin...the lack of regard for others....

That is one defining characteristic of narcissism. Like when people place their own needs above others. Like the NR FA in this case. Like FA's who put their luggage in bins above paying F passengers. All things being equal, customer service ethic demands that you extend courtesies to those who pay your salary, not demand that they meet your needs.

pseudoswede Oct 13, 16 1:43 pm


Originally Posted by rufflesinc (Post 27341263)
I have health issues that make me adverse to the for sale food. Should I have to not eat my nut KIND bars on a 6 hr tcon?

Yes. I would offer you some vegan, nut-free granola bars for free.

zombietooth Oct 13, 16 2:39 pm


Originally Posted by 747FC (Post 27341544)
That is one defining characteristic of narcissism. Like when people place their own needs above others. Like the NR FA in this case. Like FA's who put their luggage in bins above paying F passengers. All things being equal, customer service ethic demands that you extend courtesies to those who pay your salary, not demand that they meet your needs.

^If her nut allergy was that important to her, she could have easily taken a seat in Y. But no, she wanted that F-seat and was willing to impose her affliction on her seat mate.

She showed no concern whatsoever for OP's needs.

I believe that UA would assert that she was a representative of the airline first.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:06 am.


This site is owned, operated, and maintained by MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Designated trademarks are the property of their respective owners.