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Travel from US to London

Travel from US to London

Old Feb 15, 21, 5:00 pm
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Travel from US to London

My wife and I are being optimistic and booking a trip to London in November. We both plan to have our vaccinations by then. What's the general sense of whether the country will be open and what kind of restrictions we might encounter?
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Old Feb 15, 21, 5:03 pm
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Originally Posted by pblawman View Post
My wife and I are being optimistic and booking a trip to London in November. We both plan to have our vaccinations by then. What's the general sense of whether the country will be open and what kind of restrictions we might encounter?
Look into the crystal ball and see what it says! I donít think anyone can guess what the state of travel will be in November.
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Old Feb 15, 21, 5:33 pm
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Originally Posted by rstruthe View Post
Look into the crystal ball and see what it says! I donít think anyone can guess what the state of travel will be in November.
The crystal ball said yes. I was looking for additional input or a friendly discussion. Thanks for contributing. :-)
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Old Feb 15, 21, 6:48 pm
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No one knows. We don't even know what will be open in March and thats two weeks away.

There are dozens of threads all over flyer talk about 'will I be able to visit X country in Y month?' (and that includes people wanting to visit the US) and the answer to each and every one is no one knows!

Not sure what 'additional input' you are after because at the moment there is no additional input to give.

It's not unfriendly to say that. But realistic.
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Old Feb 15, 21, 6:58 pm
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Truly, nobody knows. Don't let anyone tell you that they do.

Not remotely worth booking anything until 30 days out. Even if things are better, schedules change constantly and you may well wind up wishing that you had booked on another carrier.
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Old Feb 16, 21, 12:32 am
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I think everyone hopes it will be better. But honestly, no-one knows whether borders will be open, a new variant emerges, or groups in the U.K. that refuse the vaccine cause a fourth wave. Far too many variables.

Book something if it gives you something to look forward to. But be prepared for it to change.
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Old Feb 16, 21, 4:41 am
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In the spirit of helpfulness, I'll give it a go:

Everybody in the UK who wants a vaccination will have had one by late summer and it's quite likely that, by then, there will be a programme ongoing of giving people differently formulated booster shots to protect against new variants. (Likelihood: 90%)
Domestically, England will be largely open (likelihood 75%) but many events and activities will be open only to those who have either been vaccinated or tested negative withing the last xx hours (likelihood 50%)
There will be strict entrance requirements to the country, with negative tests and quarantine, in some form or other, even for those who have been vaccinated, to guard against the import of variant strains (likelihood 33%).
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Old Feb 16, 21, 5:25 am
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Originally Posted by lhrsfo View Post
Everybody in the UK who wants a vaccination will have had one by late summer and it's quite likely that, by then, there will be a programme ongoing of giving people differently formulated booster shots to protect against new variants. (Likelihood: 90%)
Domestically, England will be largely open (likelihood 75%) but many events and activities will be open only to those who have either been vaccinated or tested negative withing the last xx hours (likelihood 50%)
There will be strict entrance requirements to the country, with negative tests and quarantine, in some form or other, even for those who have been vaccinated, to guard against the import of variant strains (likelihood 33%).
My gut says the same thing, though with the addition that larger events and activities will likely be limited in capacity. I'd also assume just turning up to anything (museums, galleries, etc.) will not be possible - everything will need to be booked in advance for a specific time (even if free).

I also think there is a good probability that mask wearing in public spaces (transport, museums, shops) will still be in place. (As an aside, after not having a cold in year, despite still having to actually go into work, I think I might continuing wearing a mask on the tube and trains even if it isn't required anymore. I'd be interested to see if it better protects me once things get closer to "normal" (i.e. the old days))
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Old Feb 16, 21, 7:41 am
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Historically, it was generally-speaking, cheaper to book in advance. But, with the elimination of change fees and other enticements, RM/IM is much more difficult. Thus, it makes all the sense to plan a trip to the UK, but little sense to book and pay. While a refund is in order if the flight is cancelled or significantly changed, a good chance that the changes are not significant and thus, if one does not wish to travel or is unable to travel, one is stuck with what amounts to a credit or rebooking for use on the carrier of choice for a later date.

Other carriers or destinations might be more useful and circumstances may change and the prospect of having made a long-term interest-free loan to an air carrier may not be the best investment.

So maybe the best way to look at this is not to book anything which is not fully refundable (at this point).
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Old Feb 16, 21, 7:57 am
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Originally Posted by UKtravelbear View Post

Not sure what 'additional input' you are after because at the moment there is no additional input to give.
That's all I needed. I was just wondering if anybody heard any rumors, projections, etc. from inside the country. I get that nobody really "knows". Some of the others were a little more helpful. But again, thanks for making me one of your 12,000 posts.
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Old Feb 16, 21, 8:18 am
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You asked for opinions so I gave you mine. If you don't like it then fine but there is no need to be rude.

The only thing that will help you is cold, hard, accurate information - for which there is none - not 'rumors, projections etc' - for which there are many but of no practical use.

I prefer to deal with the former not the latter.
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Old Feb 16, 21, 8:29 am
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Thanks. I'm sorry, I shouldn't have been so curt in my response.
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Old Feb 16, 21, 8:51 am
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My wife and I are being optimistic and booking a trip to London in November.
Again, I'd advise not to book and pay for travel so far out.
In my eyes the Post Covid-19 travel world will be much different that we were getting used in 2019 and earlier on.
In the future governments will quickly shut borders and restrict travel at short notice, once, an infectious disease is spreading. That may include an agreesive flu variant, MERS or a Coronavirus mutation.
So we may have survived Covid-19 by November 2021, all it takes is another virus scare (another Ebola spread in West Africa) and travel is going to be shut down again.

So solution -> book flights/travel only a short notice and if the prices are too high, change the travel destination or abandon the travel plans alltogether. I am pretty sure that the travel market will adjust to this new reality.
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Old Feb 16, 21, 9:55 am
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Originally Posted by UKtravelbear View Post
We don't even know what will be open in March and thats two weeks away.

This pretty much sums it up.

With vaccines increasing, rates decreasing massively and overall complete "I'm done with lockdown" sentiment things are VERY fluid.
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Old Feb 16, 21, 11:16 am
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Originally Posted by pblawman View Post
My wife and I are being optimistic and booking a trip to London in November. We both plan to have our vaccinations by then. What's the general sense of whether the country will be open and what kind of restrictions we might encounter?
If you want a positive outlook, past SARS viruses have generally lasted 2 seasons as a pandemic and then became endemic. The wildcard is how governments will use or not use their new found powers to continue lockdowns and border closures past any medically necessary point. Book the trip.
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