Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Destinations > Europe > U.K. and Ireland
Reload this Page >

Local lockdowns in the UK

Old Oct 15, 2020, 7:45 pm
FlyerTalk Forums Expert How-Tos and Guides
Last edit by: NewbieRunner
Print Wikipost

Local lockdowns in the UK

Old Jan 13, 2021, 3:20 pm
  #766  
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 7,084
Today I did venture into Chiswick to find somewhere to print a document. The high street at 11AM was fairly empty, a lot emptier than, say, at any time in December. Perhaps it was the crappy weather, but still. However, the annoying chihuahua that keeps on barking for minutes on end was, as usual, out in the park outside my flat for hours today.

Last edited by 13901; Jan 13, 2021 at 3:29 pm
13901 is offline  
Old Jan 13, 2021, 3:26 pm
  #767  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Manchester, United Kingdom
Programs: Hilton Gold, Priority Club Blue, SPG Gold, Sofitel Gold, FB Ivory, BA Blue
Posts: 8,456
Originally Posted by 13901
Why do you say that? I don't think the EMA can be blamed for disparities in the vaccination between EU countries.
They were one of the last to approve anything, anywhere. Tick tock.
Internaut is offline  
Old Jan 13, 2021, 3:28 pm
  #768  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Manchester, United Kingdom
Programs: Hilton Gold, Priority Club Blue, SPG Gold, Sofitel Gold, FB Ivory, BA Blue
Posts: 8,456
Originally Posted by fransknorge
It is rarely mentioned because it is rarely looked into and reported. Actually there are no field in the stats reported to Public Health Authority for reinfection. Anecdotally (and yes this is weak) there are a fait bit of doctors who see them, they report them on social media.
A handful of countries have more of a system to report them and in between those 4-5 countries there were nearly 1000 recorded in October.
Then there is the case of Manaus....
Last NHS vamp to suck blood out of my arm told me shed had it twice, had had a few other clinicians at the hospital. Anecdotal, I know, but safest to assume it does happen.
Internaut is offline  
Old Jan 13, 2021, 3:30 pm
  #769  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: where lions are led by donkeys...
Programs: Lifetime Gold, Global Entry, Hertz PC, and my wallet
Posts: 20,277
Originally Posted by Internaut
They were one of the last to approve anything, anywhere. Tick tock.
And last time I looked the EMA hadn't approved the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine.
Silver Fox is offline  
Old Jan 14, 2021, 12:35 am
  #770  
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 7,084
Originally Posted by Internaut
They were one of the last to approve anything, anywhere. Tick tock.
That's not strictly true but even if it were it doesn't explain the difference in speed between different countries in Europe.
13901 is offline  
Old Jan 14, 2021, 12:42 am
  #771  
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 9,253
Originally Posted by 13901
As for doing it properly, the question of delaying the second jab is still open and as far as I know (happy to be proven wrong) it doesn't seem that anyone else is following us on that route.
I don't know how much clout he's got, but this guy is suggesting a similar approach.

https://www.thaipbsworld.com/pulmono...hin-this-year/
ft101 is offline  
Old Jan 14, 2021, 3:23 am
  #772  
Moderator: UK and Ireland & Europe, and Carbon Conscious Travel
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Biggleswade
Programs: SK*G, Lots of Blue Elsewhere
Posts: 13,609
Originally Posted by ft101
I don't know how much clout he's got, but this guy is suggesting a similar approach.

https://www.thaipbsworld.com/pulmono...hin-this-year/
I've seen a number of virologists express their discomfort with the delayed second dose, though. Having a significant population with partial vaccine-based immunity to a mutating virus could be considered a risk for a drug-resistant mutation.
NickB and LETTERBOY like this.
stut is offline  
Old Jan 14, 2021, 4:57 am
  #773  
HB7
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: London, UK
Programs: BA Exec Club, SIA KrisFlyer, Qantas FF, Emirates Skywards
Posts: 1,846
With regards to the vaccination program, I think the UK should be number one - at least that is what we get told time and time and time again by our scientists and politicians. We did approve the Pfizer vaccine first and we also approved the Oxford vaccine first, which is a vaccine here in the UK. Furthermore, we have a National Health Service, so the federal government can coordinate a national response and there really is no excuses left for the government.

If we are to compare to anyone, it should be Israel, who are doing this much better than us. If one is the best at their chosen occupation, they compare themselves to the best - not look around the world and say we are doing well compared to so many, but still not leading. And I'm only saying this because once again, we keep being told how great we are, particularly in immunizations and vaccines. So if we are so great, and we started weeks before anyone else, and there has been no setbacks that we have been told about, why are we not leading the pack?? And clearly we are NOT doing everything we can to reach the target of 2.5 million vaccinated per week. For example, Boris Johnson yesterday finally gave in to pressure of having some centres vaccinating 24 hours per day. There are plenty of shift workers who are willing to be vaccinated at 2, 3 or 4 am.

I think the government has had enough excuses, in my opinion. They're time is up. They have now on many occasions said they will reach 14 million people vaccinated (with their first dose) on the 15th of February. If they don't reach that target, it simply isn't good enough.
lhrsfo and LETTERBOY like this.
HB7 is offline  
Old Jan 14, 2021, 5:27 am
  #774  
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: LON
Programs: BAEC
Posts: 3,834
Originally Posted by HB7
I think the government has had enough excuses, in my opinion. They're time is up. They have now on many occasions said they will reach 14 million people vaccinated (with their first dose) on the 15th of February. If they don't reach that target, it simply isn't good enough.
The UK (Westminster) government have been careful in their language, they have generally always said their target is to offer the vaccine to priority groups 1-4 (broadly 15m people) by mid-Feb, not to have delivered. It is offer because (a) it's not compulsory, and (b) it can mean the letter has been sent to permit those people to book but due to lack of slots the delivery will go over the mid-Feb dateline and there is some wriggle room...
plunet is offline  
Old Jan 14, 2021, 5:47 am
  #775  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: UK
Programs: BA Gold
Posts: 1,017
Originally Posted by HB7
With regards to the vaccination program, I think the UK should be number one - at least that is what we get told time and time and time again by our scientists and politicians. We did approve the Pfizer vaccine first and we also approved the Oxford vaccine first, which is a vaccine here in the UK. Furthermore, we have a National Health Service, so the federal government can coordinate a national response and there really is no excuses left for the government.

If we are to compare to anyone, it should be Israel, who are doing this much better than us. If one is the best at their chosen occupation, they compare themselves to the best - not look around the world and say we are doing well compared to so many, but still not leading. And I'm only saying this because once again, we keep being told how great we are, particularly in immunizations and vaccines. So if we are so great, and we started weeks before anyone else, and there has been no setbacks that we have been told about, why are we not leading the pack?? And clearly we are NOT doing everything we can to reach the target of 2.5 million vaccinated per week. For example, Boris Johnson yesterday finally gave in to pressure of having some centres vaccinating 24 hours per day. There are plenty of shift workers who are willing to be vaccinated at 2, 3 or 4 am.

I think the government has had enough excuses, in my opinion. They're time is up. They have now on many occasions said they will reach 14 million people vaccinated (with their first dose) on the 15th of February. If they don't reach that target, it simply isn't good enough.
mrs bluemoon is volunteering at the local vaccine centre, this isnt a major hub, but a local centre where people are directed instead of their gp surgery.
This week it has been open for only 1.5 days, due to a shortage of vaccine. The vast majority of people there are volunteers, including all those wielding the needles, you wont get the centre open 24/7 unless you pay a significant number of people.
bluemoon68 is offline  
Old Jan 14, 2021, 6:30 am
  #776  
HB7
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: London, UK
Programs: BA Exec Club, SIA KrisFlyer, Qantas FF, Emirates Skywards
Posts: 1,846
Originally Posted by bluemoon68
mrs bluemoon is volunteering at the local vaccine centre, this isnt a major hub, but a local centre where people are directed instead of their gp surgery.
This week it has been open for only 1.5 days, due to a shortage of vaccine. The vast majority of people there are volunteers, including all those wielding the needles, you wont get the centre open 24/7 unless you pay a significant number of people.
I agree that you definitely can't have every place 24 hours - likely the major centres only.

Regarding paying people more, I agree and the government should do that immediately. The extra costs should not be a deterrent. We are in lockdown - the only way to get the economy going again is to get people vaccinated. If the government needs to take out more debt, now is the time.
HB7 is offline  
Old Jan 14, 2021, 7:09 am
  #777  
Community Director
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Norwich, UK
Programs: A3*G, BA Gold, BD Gold (in memoriam), IHG Diamond Ambassador
Posts: 8,416
Originally Posted by PxC
My main concern is that the Oxford vaccine has a 62% efficacy with two full doses and 90% with a half dose followed by a full dose. Are we just going to give up all of this performance and settle for 62%? I wish the journalists would ask useful questions like this rather than repeat stupid questions to get a headline about whether Boris regrets something.
This question has been raised and answered on several occasions by science/medical professionals (i.e. not politicians). The answer has consistently been that direct comparison of efficacy percentages is largely pointless because the way they were measured for each vaccine was different. In other words, applying the Moderna criteria and sample to the Oxford vaccine might well produce a 90%+ efficacy result for Oxford, but that simply wasn't the way it was tested. In addition, the 90% figure comes from too small a sample to be definitive, so it might well drop closer to the 62% level if more results were introduced.

The key is that all the approved vaccines are considered safe and effective, otherwise they wouldn't be deployed. Ask yourself this, as well: would you rather take many years to roll out a vaccine which has more stringent storage requirements, and may well not be any more effective than other products, or would you also deploy one that can achieve an acceptable mass vaccination now and is also more flexible in terms of being able to be tweaked for future mutations?

If you truly want to contain the ability of the virus to spread and mutate as quickly as possible, personally I'd have thought the answer was clear. That's equally why processing people 24/7 is important - with the current rate of spread, every day gained is important.
HB7, KARFA and 13901 like this.
NWIFlyer is offline  
Old Jan 14, 2021, 8:11 am
  #778  
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: UK
Programs: BAEC GGL, HHonors Diamond, IHG Uninspired, Marriott Bonvoy Titanium, UK AMEX Plat
Posts: 2,143
Originally Posted by PxC
My main concern is that the Oxford vaccine has a 62% efficacy with two full doses and 90% with a half dose followed by a full dose. Are we just going to give up all of this performance and settle for 62%? I wish the journalists would ask useful questions like this rather than repeat stupid questions to get a headline about whether Boris regrets something.
They covered this on last week's More Or Less, in detail. It is complicated and depends how you measure it + slice the data. I can very much recommend a listen! https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m000r4t9
KARFA and plunet like this.
Gagravarr is offline  
Old Jan 14, 2021, 9:15 am
  #779  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: where lions are led by donkeys...
Programs: Lifetime Gold, Global Entry, Hertz PC, and my wallet
Posts: 20,277
Delaying Second Dose of COVID-19 Vaccines 'The Right Thing to Do'
Prof Andrew Goddard, president of the RCP, said he had "thought long and hard" about the decision but had concluded "it was the right thing to do". Eleanor Riley, professor of immunology and infectious disease at the University of Edinburgh, admitted she had been sceptical initially about the decision but that "the more I thought about it, the more it made perfect sense".

Prof Eleanor Riley/RCP

On December 31, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation decided that vaccinating a greater number of people with a single dose would prevent more deaths and hospitalisations than vaccinating a smaller number of people with two doses. It said that efficacy for the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine against symptomatic COVID-19 following an initial dose was 89% from day 14 after the vaccination was administered.

It also found that the level of protection after a single dose of the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine was 73% after 22 days following the first dose.

The JCVI recommended a gap of up to 12 weeks between the first and second doses of both vaccines.

The move was controversial among some scientists and clinicians who pointed out that the wider spacing regimen went against the methods used in clinical trials where doses were administered at 3 or 4 week intervals.

'No Immunological Worries'
Prof Riley told the RCP's 2021 conference that in the case of the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine, data showed that "the immunological response with a second dose at 12 weeks is certainly no worse and actually looks really a little bit better than giving an earlier second dose".

She said the results built on research over the last few years on vaccination dosing schedules that suggested "a delayed second dose is frequently beneficial".

Some older vaccination dosing schedules "may have been unnecessarily quick", she added.

However, Prof Riley cautioned that longer intervals between vaccine doses could drive down patient compliance.

"Life gets in the way, people move house, people change jobs, people get other diseases, things happen at home – that means people don't get the letter inviting them for their second dose, or they are just unable to return.

"And the longer you leave it, the bigger the risk is of that."
Silver Fox is offline  
Old Jan 14, 2021, 9:55 am
  #780  
Ambassador, British Airways; FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Leeds, UK
Programs: BA GGL/CCR, GfL, HH Diamond
Posts: 42,450
Further restrictions in Scotland
https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ssi/2.../contents/made
In force from 16 January

For businesses offering goods for sale/hire, collection is only possible for these shops;
- baby equipment shops, book shops, clothing shops, electrical goods shops, including repair shops, footwear shops, garden centres and plant nurseries, homeware shops, key cutting shops, libraries, and shoe repair shops,
and where appointments for collection are staggered to create gaps, and access to premises is limited.

Food and drink takeaways must ensure any collection does not involve the customer entering the premises.

No consumption of alcohol in a public place in any Level 4 area.

Last edited by KARFA; Jan 14, 2021 at 10:01 am
KARFA is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

This site is owned, operated, and maintained by MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Designated trademarks are the property of their respective owners.