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NHS registration to give birth in UK

NHS registration to give birth in UK

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Old Aug 9, 18, 10:02 pm
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NHS registration to give birth in UK

Hi guys,

I'm British working in Bangkok, Thailand. My Thai girlfriend just got pregnant and we are planning to travel to UK next month then give birth in UK. We are not married and not planning to but she's already got UK long-term visitor visa.

Understanding that our baby will be ordinary resident and illegible for free NHS. Can you guys please let me know is there any registration I need to make for my girlfriend and our baby to have free NHS during the pregnancy and giving birth?

Any advice and help would be much appreciated.

Thanks a lot.

Christian.
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Old Aug 10, 18, 2:22 am
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Originally Posted by satchuk View Post
Hi guys,

I'm British working in Bangkok, Thailand. My Thai girlfriend just got pregnant and we are planning to travel to UK next month then give birth in UK. We are not married and not planning to but she's already got UK long-term visitor visa.

Understanding that our baby will be ordinary resident and illegible for free NHS. Can you guys please let me know is there any registration I need to make for my girlfriend and our baby to have free NHS during the pregnancy and giving birth?

Any advice and help would be much appreciated.

Thanks a lot.

Christian.
I don't believe she will be eligible for free NHS care to give birth. Unless she has a visa that she has paid and NHS surcharge and it shows she is eligible for free NHS care you could get surprised. When she applied for the visa did she specifically state it was to give birth in the UK? I work in the NHS ( not nursing) and know a lot of emails have been sent to employees on making sure the patients ( especially obstetric) are eligible for free care. Technically when you return as a British citizen returning from working abroad toy are suppose to see if you are required to pay an NHS surcharge coming back into the UK.
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Old Aug 10, 18, 2:54 am
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My girlfriend got a visitor visa before she got pregnant, and IHS is not available for Visitor visa. She just recently got pregnant and now we are planning to go to UK.

From what I understood, the baby is considered as an Ordinary citizen if one of the the parent is British. I'm currently working in Thailand but working as expat, employed by a British company. Therefore, I believe she and the baby should be eligible for free NHS if I register the baby as mine at the hospital.

Please refer to page 2 of the following document: birthrights.org.uk/library/factsheets/Foreign-Nationals-and-Maternity-Care.pdf

Please correct me if I misunderstood something. Thanks.
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Old Aug 10, 18, 3:48 am
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Originally Posted by satchuk View Post
My girlfriend got a visitor visa before she got pregnant, and IHS is not available for Visitor visa. She just recently got pregnant and now we are planning to go to UK.

From what I understood, the baby is considered as an Ordinary citizen if one of the the parent is British. I'm currently working in Thailand but working as expat, employed by a British company. Therefore, I believe she and the baby should be eligible for free NHS if I register the baby as mine at the hospital.

Please refer to page 2 of the following document: birthrights.org.uk/library/factsheets/Foreign-Nationals-and-Maternity-Care.pdf

Please correct me if I misunderstood something. Thanks.
Reading the very first paragraph answers your question.

Like NHS treatment generally, maternity care is free of charge to those who are ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK. This can include foreign nationals. It may exclude British citizens if they do not ordinarily reside in the UK. If you are not ordinarily resident, you may be charged for your care under the National Health Service Act 2006 and the National Health Service (Charges to Overseas Visitors) Regulations 2011. However, maternity care, even in early pregnancy, must not be withheld or delayed if a pregnant woman is unable to pay in advance because of the health risks associated with pregnancy and childbirth. You should be informed if charges apply

She is not an ordinary resident and neither are you. So there should be no free NHS care for either of you. Not sure where you are getting she has free care. The baby will get immediate care as required but from the document you posted no one will be eligible for free care. Technically when you return to the UK you should declare that you are back as a permanent resident and pay an NHS surcharge to get back into the system. This is rarely enforced for British citizens that have lived in the UK before but can be enforced.

Just because it says care will not be withheld, that does not mean it will be free. there will be a charge.

If you will declare you are a full time resident of the UK during the pregnancy and after the baby is born you can probably have it assigned as an ordinary resident. If you go back to work overseas then no one is an ordinary resident and no one will qualify for free NHS care. remember they will not deny care, but there will be a cost.

I suggest you talk to the British embassy to get the true answer. Of course they may revoke your girlfriends visa if they suspect she it trying to get free obstetric care, They can even deny her entry of she looks pregnant. The airlines also have regulations for pregnant women.
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Last edited by MoreMilesPlease; Aug 10, 18 at 3:54 am
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Old Aug 10, 18, 3:55 am
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Thanks a lot for the quick response.

I do understand she, as an individual, is not eligible for free care. I'm assuming that she and the baby will have free care because the baby is mine.

So from what you're saying, can it be understood that once we get back and I register/pay the NHS surcharge, then she+the baby will be eligible for free NHS?
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Old Aug 10, 18, 4:27 am
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Originally Posted by satchuk View Post
Thanks a lot for the quick response.

I do understand she, as an individual, is not eligible for free care. I'm assuming that she and the baby will have free care because the baby is mine.

So from what you're saying, can it be understood that once we get back and I register/pay the NHS surcharge, then she+the baby will be eligible for free NHS?
No, that's not at all what's been said. Mate, it's time for a little reality check, and your issues go WAY beyond who's paying (and how much) for the birth:
  1. You're not married.
  2. Even if you were, the only way she's allowed into the UK is as a tourist or with the appropriate visa, which may or may not be granted.
  3. If she rocks up at LHR immigration with a tourist visa and looks pregnant, she may be denied entry. That a British citizen is the father is neither here nor there.
  4. She's not entitled to free NHS care, given that she's not "ordinarily resident" in the UK. Again, you being the father don't enter into it.
  5. As a British citizen, you can become "ordinarily resident" by simply returning so that you are normally residing in the UK (apart from temporary or occasional absences), and your residence there is adopted voluntarily and for settled purposes as part of the regular order of your life for the time being, whether for short or long duration (official NHS guidance). She can't do that, as she has to obtain a proper immigration visa first.
Get things sorted NOW and talk to an immigration lawyer.
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Old Aug 10, 18, 4:48 am
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Duplicate

Last edited by MoreMilesPlease; Aug 10, 18 at 9:46 am
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Old Aug 10, 18, 4:51 am
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Originally Posted by satchuk View Post
Thanks a lot for the quick response.

I do understand she, as an individual, is not eligible for free care. I'm assuming that she and the baby will have free care because the baby is mine.

So from what you're saying, can it be understood that once we get back and I register/pay the NHS surcharge, then she+the baby will be eligible for free NHS?
No. Nothing you are saying is what will happen.

You are not eligible for free NHS care as an expat. You will need to return to the UK, declaring you will now be a permanent UK resident, pay the returning British National NHS surcharge ( this has been repealed for returning nationals), and then YOU will be eligible for free NHS care. But the OP will still need to declare he is moving home on a permanent basis. So if he still has a job in Thailand that would disqualify him from any free care on the NHS.

Your girlfriend will not be eligible for ANY free NHS care. Unless she has a visa that allows residence and has paid the NHS surcharge that is levied prior to granting such visa ( £500 I think for the surcharge) she will not receive ANY free NHS care. They probably won't deny her care, but she will have a bill for herself and the baby.

Once the baby is born I doubt it will be eligible for free NHS care. I suppose if yiu are granted sole custody and rwside in the UK as an ordinary ( permanape) resident then the baby May ququali for free NHS care.

If you are not coming back to the UK permanently and return to Thailand then you are not entitled to free NHS care. British citizenship no longer entitles you to walk in and out of the UK as an expat and get free Care.

Last edited by MoreMilesPlease; Aug 10, 18 at 9:47 am
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Old Aug 10, 18, 5:19 am
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Originally Posted by MoreMilesPlease View Post
Technically when you return as a British citizen returning from working abroad toy are suppose to see if you are required to pay an NHS surcharge coming back into the UK.
Originally Posted by MoreMilesPlease View Post
Technically when you return to the UK you should declare that you are back as a permanent resident and pay an NHS surcharge to get back into the system.
This sounds dubious. Can you provide a source?
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Old Aug 10, 18, 5:39 am
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https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/hea...ital-care.html

NHS is residency based, citizenship is irrelevant. OP himself is currently not eligible for free NHS, let alone the girlfriend and baby.
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Old Aug 10, 18, 5:39 am
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Originally Posted by :D! View Post
This sounds dubious. Can you provide a source?
Not dubious at all.

https://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/Healthcareabroad/movingabroad/Pages/Introduction.aspx
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Old Aug 10, 18, 5:50 am
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Originally Posted by MoreMilesPlease View Post
pay thr returning British National NHS surcharge, and then YOU will be eleigible for free NHS care.
That bit is bollox - OP is a British citizen and is not required to pay the surcharge. The healthcare surcharge is for those making an immigration application.

And once you're in, you're in (if your're a citizen or have indefinite leave to remain): "Provision of free NHS treatment is on the basis of being ordinarily resident and is not dependent upon nationality, payment of UK taxes, national insurance (NI) contributions, being registered with a GP, having an NHS number or owning property in the UK. "
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Old Aug 10, 18, 5:55 am
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satchuk, a slightly belated welcome to FT.

I think when you mention registration you may be getting confused with the NHS surcharge, which those not qualified for free care have to pay at the time of making a visa application if they wish to make themselves eligible for NHS services during their time in the country. It can be "attached", at time of application, to a long term visit visa.

I am certainly not an expert in this field, so as others have suggested you should probably consult an immigration lawyer who can best guide you. I would imagine it is perfectly possible that existing conditions, including pregnancy, are not covered - otherwise the current charge of £200 would make something of a mockery of the system if you could simply decide to pay it after you have a diagnosis of anything rather than the full cost.

Reapplying now and trying to pay the surcharge would probably lead to your visa application being refused, and indeed your girlfriend could still be refused entry at the border on her existing visa if the immigration officer believes she is solely or mainly here for healthcare.

This is a very complicated scenario, one way beyond the understanding of most people on FT, so - whilst you might be able to get a general flavour of the direction, and establish that your girlfriend is not entitled to free care - you are probably not going to find a definitive answer, so take a broad view, do some more research, and then consult someone who will either help with your application or at least give you an official answer.
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Old Aug 10, 18, 6:03 am
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Originally Posted by MoreMilesPlease View Post
That doesn't mention returning citizens, does it?
See...
https://www.gov.uk/government/public...-hospital-care

Citizens who return to the UK on a settled basis will be classed as ordinarily resident, and will be eligible for free NHS care immediately.
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Old Aug 10, 18, 6:05 am
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As someone whose wife is from overseas, and who has followed the UK visa and immigration process to the letter in order to be living together in the UK, paying the necessary visa fees including NHS surcharges, I find the entitled attitude of the OP to be astounding.

There are hospitals in Thailand I believe, and presumably Thai people are able to give birth in them without too much trouble?

Being constructive for a moment, having gone through the visa process ourselves, the fiancée or married persons visa may be the solution but these involve at least a temporary relocation to the Uk, a fairly hefty visa fee and quite a lot of documentation. And perhaps a change of your current marital stars. I’m not sure you could satisfy the requirements if you’re still an expat as they require UK residency, UK earnings and UK savings to prove the financial qualifications.

There isn’t a “fleece the NHS” visa to my knowledge.

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