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Vacation rentals in Edinburgh and London

Vacation rentals in Edinburgh and London

Old Apr 12, 18, 11:59 am
  #16  
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Originally Posted by TribalistMeathead View Post
My wife's older sister and her family live outside Oxford, and we've stayed at 2 different AirBnB properties in their town (both owned by the same landlady). I can't recommend the experience highly enough. They're cheaper than a hotel or B&B, there's plenty of room to stretch out, and having a kitchen is great and a massive money-saver as well (though, to date, we've only used the kitchen to fix breakfast and heat up ready-made meals for dinner).

I do not do business with companies who have unethical business practices. AirBnB is one of those. They have consistently fought having to remove illegal rental from their listings. Why? Because they don't make money by removing a listing, only by having as many listings and resulting bookings, as possible. When a company knowingly continues to do something like this, they are not a company I would want to do business with.

I strongly suggest that people avoid using AirBnB.
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Old Apr 13, 18, 8:43 am
  #17  
 
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Originally Posted by dulciusexasperis View Post
I do not do business with companies who have unethical business practices. AirBnB is one of those. They have consistently fought having to remove illegal rental from their listings.
What sort of "illegal" rentals?

AirBnB, Uber and plenty of others would see themselves as disruptive technologies and may well "break the law" or more often be on the very edge of it... certainly in the UK Uber was challenged in court over the ability to effectively "hail" a car using the app which would be illegal as private hire cars must be prebooked.

Pushing the boundaries, challenging the status quo etc I dont have a problem with. On the otherhand if they are allowing condemned buildings being rented out or allow those with unspent violent convictions be drivers etc then thats a different thing.

We've used AirBnB a couple of times (not in London as we live in central London) and never had any problems and been very happy with the experience... has the property owner obeyed all laws in terms of letting their property out? To be honest I'm personally not too concerned.
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Old Apr 14, 18, 12:03 pm
  #18  
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Perhaps you are not aware of the effect illegal rentals are having Astaroth. Read here for an example: https://qz.com/1153390/paris-threate...tment-rentals/

Googling 'illegal airbnb rentals' will find you plenty of other examples.

But the issue is not one of just 'pushing the boundaries' as you put it. It is also an issue of 'unintended consequences'. When your renting a Paris apartment impacts those who work and live in Paris and cannot find a place to rent long term, you are personally affecting those people in a negative way. Is your short term wish to rent an apartment for a few nights, more important than their need to rent long term? That is one unintended consequence of Airbnb. Look at the number of listings in Paris, 65,000! When someone rents a room in their home as a normal B&B does, that has no real impact on the local long term rental market. But when they rent out the entire house or apartment, that does impact the long term rental market obviously.

When someone has lived in a Paris(or anywhere else) apartment building for 30 years and suddenly find themselves living next door to what has become in reality a 'hotel apartment', with constant comings and goings of strangers at all times of day and night, strangers who have a key or access number to enter the building which is someone's home, it is not hard to understand how those who are resident can be unhappy with such a situation. When you use Airbnb Astaroth, you may be happy with the experience but those living in the apartments next to the one you rented may not. What consideration is given to them?
https://www.google.ca/search?q=all+m...hrome&ie=UTF-8

When rather than someone renting a room in their home or even their entire home when they are themselves away for a short time (the original concept of Airbnb), it is exploited by people who buy or rent homes with the sole intent of turning them into short term rentals on Airbnb et al, what then?
https://www.engadget.com/2016/10/19/...san-francisco/

What about people who are evicted from their home so it can be turned into a Airbnb rental?
Evictions and Conversions: The Dark Side of Airbnb

I could go on Astaroth but anyone can find out more for themselves simply by taking the time to Google on the subject.

Airbnb has fought any attempts to have them restrict listings, tooth and nail. Where they have agree to changes it is only after they have seen they are going to lose the battle. Listings mean bookings and bookings mean profit. Airbnb are now a big corporate business with only one goal, profits. The unintended consequences of their business and the morality of it are not of interest to them. They knowingly allow illegal listings in places like Paris, because it makes them more money. It's as simple as that. They don't care if it drives long term rental prices up; has people evicted from their homes; has people find their apartment building has been turned into a de facto hotel, etc.

So when you write that you are not too personally concerned if an owner is renting illegally, I can understand what you are saying, but do you understand what you are contributing to? Are those unintended consequences not of concern to you?
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Old Apr 16, 18, 2:24 am
  #19  
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If you are willing to stay outside of London (although very close to a train station that goes directly into the city), and are interested in having a totally unique experience, consider renting the Georgian House from Landmark Trust at Hampton Court Palace. It definitely will sleep your whole family and has a full kitchen, however only a bathrub, no shower.

Renting here gives you full access to the grounds of Hampton Court 24 hours a day; most notably after it is closed to the public when you will mostly have the entire place to yourself, except for the guards, members using the "Real; Tennis" courts (well worth watching), and the ghosts. It's in high demand, though, so is often snapped up well in advance. But I assure you that your kids and you will remember it for years to come. I know I sure did!

https://www.landmarktrust.org.uk/sea...ian-house-7805
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Old Apr 17, 18, 11:12 am
  #20  
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There are various 'trusts' in the UK who rent out properties that are well worth looking at RichardinSF. The Vivat Trust is one of them. I have rented The Tower of Hallbar, also known as Braidwood Castle from them. For some reason I can't seem to get the page up on Vivat's own website but here is another website that rents it for them as well and has some good photos.
https://www.lhhscotland.com/properties/detail/?id=25690

People often don't think outside the box when it comes to places to stay. Universities for example often rent out student accommodation when 'school is out'. Imagine having stayed one week in each of two years, being able to say to some pretentious bore at a cocktail party, 'oh yes, I was resident at Oxford University in 2018 and in 2019. I enjoyed my time spent there.' Not a lie exactly but definitely misleading. LOL
https://www.universityrooms.com/en-GB/city/oxford/home
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Old Apr 17, 18, 6:30 pm
  #21  
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Yes, and the National Trust also rents out a bunch of places too. What's special about Landmark Trust is that they sort of have a tradition that each of their rentals be quirky in some way, usually not mentioned on the booking site. That tends to add an element of fun that I like and I bet kids would too.
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Old Apr 24, 18, 1:37 pm
  #22  
 
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Originally Posted by dulciusexasperis View Post
I do not do business with companies who have unethical business practices. AirBnB is one of those. They have consistently fought having to remove illegal rental from their listings. Why? Because they don't make money by removing a listing, only by having as many listings and resulting bookings, as possible. When a company knowingly continues to do something like this, they are not a company I would want to do business with.

I strongly suggest that people avoid using AirBnB.
I'm not crazy about AirBnB either, but there was just no other way to make this booking. No VRBO, no local letting agencies, no Craiglist listings, no nothing. And technically we've only booked through them once and now book directly with the landlady - all parties are happier with that arrangement.
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Old Apr 26, 18, 10:46 am
  #23  
 
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Originally Posted by dulciusexasperis View Post
Perhaps you are not aware of the effect illegal rentals are having Astaroth.
You are aware that the vast majority of the things you listed are not actually "illegal"?

How is having your rental agreement terminated because the contractual annual escalation isnt keeping it up to market rates any different to having it terminated because the owner hopes they can get more via short term lets?

Maybe its the Londoner in me but living in a development of 8 blocks of circa 35 flats, most of which are occupied by renters rather than owners, I'm used to sitting in our communial gardens and seeing a dozen people I don't know. I dont even know which are the residents and which are the friends/guests. Which are short term renters and which are long term.

Most of which you list are social issues but not things that make it illegal. I'm not saying AirBnB are perfect nor are they necessarily a moral company but the "illegal" flag is raised too often for things that aren't and there are somethings that may be "illegal" that probably shouldnt. Transport for London (the London governmental agency for travel) took court action against Uber on the grounds that their app was equiv of hailing a cab rather than prebooking a private hire car but intentionally submitted no evidence against them and so the court ruled it was prebooking and so their operations legal (obv since then they have raised issues with other aspects)
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Old Apr 26, 18, 1:23 pm
  #24  
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Try looking outside your blocks of flats into the rest of the world Astaroth and you will find Airbnb increasingly under push back from cities everywhere. Take Paris as an example. With 65,000 rentals listed on Airbnb and only 11, 0000 legally registered. https://qz.com/1153390/paris-threate...tment-rentals/

Airbnb is well aware that the majority of listings are illegal and yet they continue to block attempts to make them de-list properties. You can find plenty of examples elsewere around the world with a simple Google search. In most of N. America for example, most cities have a 30 day minimum rental bylaw for properties. How then does someone rent by the night legally? Answer, they don't, they rent illegally through sites like Airbnb which knows the listing is for an illegal rental.

Airbnb is a simple business. Listings bring in money. De-listing known illegal rentals does not bring in money. Result, ignore legalities and morality, go for the money.
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Old Jun 11, 18, 11:57 am
  #25  
 
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In London, you can try this new option: https://www.tributeportfoliohomes.com which is like airbnb but in conjunction with Marriott. You earn Marriott rewards as well.
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Old Jun 12, 18, 3:05 am
  #26  
 
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Originally Posted by Astaroth View Post
You are aware that the vast majority of the things you listed are not actually "illegal"?

How is having your rental agreement terminated because the contractual annual escalation isnt keeping it up to market rates any different to having it terminated because the owner hopes they can get more via short term lets?

Maybe its the Londoner in me but living in a development of 8 blocks of circa 35 flats, most of which are occupied by renters rather than owners, I'm used to sitting in our communial gardens and seeing a dozen people I don't know. I dont even know which are the residents and which are the friends/guests. Which are short term renters and which are long term.

Most of which you list are social issues but not things that make it illegal. I'm not saying AirBnB are perfect nor are they necessarily a moral company but the "illegal" flag is raised too often for things that aren't and there are somethings that may be "illegal" that probably shouldnt. Transport for London (the London governmental agency for travel) took court action against Uber on the grounds that their app was equiv of hailing a cab rather than prebooking a private hire car but intentionally submitted no evidence against them and so the court ruled it was prebooking and so their operations legal (obv since then they have raised issues with other aspects)

I can pretty much guarantee that many ( most?) of the Air BnB rentals in the United States are probably illegal rentals. The United States has strict occupancy laws. while this varies from place to place there are very, very few local governments that allow nightly rentals without being a registered transient lodging type business. Most residential neighborhoods/flats/apartments./condos do not allow rentals of 3 months or less. Nightly rentals are highly regulated and an individual cannot just rent out a room for a night or two even in a single family home without breaking the legal requirements of the city, county or state.

.I currently live in a flat in London. I know my lease specifically states that I cannot sublet or rent without permission. I have a friend that rented a room through Air B&B. She rented from people who were renting themselves. Everything worked out and she stayed long term. Problem was they couldn't add her to the lease , legally, because they were not suppose to sublet and were afraid to approach the agency in case they got into trouble. Happens frequently where I live. I believe an owner can do pretty much what they want in my building in London. It would be a completely different story in my development in Florida! In Florida I have a set of owners regulations that I agreed to follow when I bought. I cannot rent for less than 3 months. I have to provide the association with the details of the person renting. The renter must be given a copy of the regulations and sign agreeing to abide by them.

So it's not a "social" thing. In many parts of the world it is a legal thing. It has to do with being compliant in local laws.
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