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British words and accents

British words and accents

Old Aug 15, 11, 2:47 pm
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British words and accents

Flying into FRA last night, I made a few language related notes:

1. When passing through with the drinks trolly, CC ask if you would like a "sweet or savoury" snack. Does anyone other than a British native speaker know what a "savory" snack is? I don't think the Germans on board did.

2. The captain thanked the passengers for "their custom". same as above - to me a British phrase not heard elsewhere in the English speaking world.

Lastly, (and I know soneone will get upset), and in the opposite direction of Britishness, does anyone think it odd when the lead CC doing the announcement has a non-British accent? This time, she was French and I though for a minute I was on the wrong plane. Terribly un-PC I know (yes I know she was 100% competent, we live in the EU, etc etc)

Probably just me. Probably get my flyertalk account suspended. I feel evil just pressing the Submit New Thread button.

Last edited by buddman; Aug 15, 11 at 3:06 pm
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Old Aug 15, 11, 2:56 pm
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Reading your thread is making me a little peckish here. Can I bum a fag?
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Old Aug 15, 11, 2:58 pm
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Originally Posted by buddman View Post

1. When passing through with the drinks trolly, CC ask if you would like a "sweet or savory" snack. Does anyone other than a British native speaker know what a "savory" snack is? I don't think the Germans on board did.

2. The captain thanked the passengers for "their custom". same as above - to me a British phrase not heard elsewhere in the English speaking world.
I can't speak for the US or Canadian people but I think a native Australian speaker would understand "savoury" and "custom". Not sure if native British English speakers would be too happy with "savory" though.

Edited to add that I had a bit more think about this, and I am now unsure if a native Australian speaker would understand 'thank you for your custom'. I must ask my Australian friends who have not travelled much.

Lastly, (and I know soneone will get upset), and in the opposite direction of Britishness, does anyone think it odd when the lead CC doing the announcement has a non-British accent?
I admit it can 'feel' a bit odd, although I don't dislike it unless the accent is so heavy that it is hard to understand what is being said (which is very rare).

Last edited by LTN Phobia; Aug 15, 11 at 3:20 pm
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Old Aug 15, 11, 2:58 pm
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Originally Posted by AJLondon View Post
Reading your thread is making me a little peckish here. Can I bum a fag?
ROFL... classic example... Can you imagine saying that almost anywhere in the US!
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Old Aug 15, 11, 2:59 pm
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All the "Yanks" I know laugh at me when I say "cheers" for anything, including someone holding a door open for me/given a drink by a barman etc.

They find it unusual.... Cheers

Matt
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Old Aug 15, 11, 3:01 pm
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It is called British Airways. Clearly they have multilingual crew but they can't let that get in the way of a brand with its identity emblazoned on everything it produces (paper, aircraft etc.)
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Old Aug 15, 11, 3:02 pm
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Originally Posted by buddman View Post
Lastly, (and I know soneone will get upset), and in the opposite direction of Britishness, does anyone think it odd when the lead CC doing the announcement has a non-British accent?
Not at all. It iz quite normale for some British to have the foreign accent, no?
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Old Aug 15, 11, 3:03 pm
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To me, one of the most endearing characteristics of flying BA is the multi-cultural, multi-national presence on board. Hey, we even had a 'Merkin* crew member on board last weekend's short LGW-EDI.

Thing's we're least likely to hear onboard a BA aircraft…

"will yee be gannin a drink with yee stottie, pet?"
"ache, awa' wi' ye lass! tak' a drink. Ye know ye wan't tae!"

* I assume American as there was no sign of a Canadian flag sown on his uniform
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Old Aug 15, 11, 3:03 pm
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Originally Posted by AJLondon View Post
Reading your thread is making me a little peckish here. Can I bum a fag?
You should have had a good dinner like me. Nothing like some ......s followed by spotted dick.
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Old Aug 15, 11, 3:03 pm
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Originally Posted by ragged View Post
You should have had a good dinner like me. Nothing like some ......s followed by spotted dick.



The noticeboard censors offal meatballs!
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Old Aug 15, 11, 3:07 pm
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Savory: It is not a common word in American English, but I am sure many people know its meaning. Especially in that context.

'their custom': I don't know what that phrase means (I'm American). Perhaps someone can fill me in.


This reminds me of a thread I was reading the other day which mentioned that a BA FA was carrying a 'torch'. That put a very odd image in my mind for half a second! (UK=flashlight, USA=flaming stick).

Given the thread . . . Cheers!
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Old Aug 15, 11, 3:08 pm
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Not entirely OT but has anyone else noticed that the PA announcements at MAD are made by a guy that sounds like a BBC continuity announcer from the 1950's yet in the lavs there is a little sign above the TAP that says "Automatic Faucet"
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Old Aug 15, 11, 3:12 pm
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Hmm. Moved to Travel and Dining.

Certainly never posted over here before!
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Old Aug 15, 11, 3:15 pm
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Welcome over to UK & Ireland. We're lovely really.
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Old Aug 15, 11, 3:16 pm
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Originally Posted by will2288 View Post
'their custom': I don't know what that phrase means (I'm American). Perhaps someone can fill me in.
Root of the word "customer".....
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